Skip to main content

Full text of "1806-1906. The centennial volume of Missouri Methodism , Methodist Episcopal church, South"

1 806 - 1 906 



THE 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME 



OF 



MISSOURI METHODISM 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

SOUTH 



BY 

MARCUS L. GRAY, 
WARD M. BAKER, Assistant. 



PRESS OF 

BURD & FLETCHER PRINTING CO. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 



Copy bight by 

M. L. Gray, 
Richmond. Mo. 




\±^7 



DEDICATION POEM. 




Written by Prof. T. Berry Smith for the Centennial Volume of 
Missouri Methodism. 




Men live in deeds not words. The deed may be 

In words and yet 'tis by the deed he lives. 

Behind all deeds are thoughts. For most of men 

Their thoughts are only thoughts and being such 

They do not live. Those men alone do live 

Who having thought make manifest their thoughts, 

In outward form. Time goes with thought and deed 

Whose thoughts are brief, he buildeth for an hour. 

But he who buildeth for Eternity 

In patience thinketh long. But time is naught 

Save purpose run with thought till in the deed 

The thought have taken shape and so stand forth 

Before the eyes of men. And then — and then 

Both thought and purpose, crystallized in deed, 

May be as clear as noon or, like the sphinx 

On Egypt's sands, the riddle of the ages. 

Thought — purpose — deed — so they have lofty aim — 

Have never failed to win the world's acclaim ; 

He liveth best who does the best he can 

In thought and deed to bless his fellow man. 



S7^._ 







PREFACE. 

About twenty years ago Eev. John M. O'Bryen and Rev. Thos. H. 
Swearingen requested the writer to become Conference Historian of the 
Missouri Annual Conference. This place was accepted and election fol- 
lowed. In the course of a year a number of biographical sketches were 
collected, but no general systematic work was undertaken till two years 
ago at the session of the Missouri Conference held at Palmyra. The 
Semi-Centennial of Central College was at hand, and it was thought to 
be an opportune time to publish a volume of sketches of the preachers. 
The Missouri Conference took action accordingly. When the plan began 
to mature, Bishop Hendrix suggested that the St. Louis Conference and 
the Southwest Missouri Conference should be included. The year 1906 
being the Centennial Year of Itinerant Methodism in Missouri, it was 
finally decided to enlarge our scope, and make the book The Centennial 
Volume of Missouri Methodism. In accordance with this plan the South- 
west Missouri Conference took favorable action at Joplin, and the St, 
Louis Conference concurred with the action of the Missouri Conference 
at the session held at Poplar Bluff. Thus the Methodism of Missouri 
undertook the work. 

It is needless to say that the enterprise involved a large outlay of 
labor and means. All the labor involved has been a pleasure, and many 
times my heart has been brought to tenderness and my eyes to tears as 
I have read the story of sacrifice and service made by heroic Methodist 
preachers and laymen in Missouri. The Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, in Missouri, is endowed with a noble past, and a virile present. 
Our wealth in Literary production is far beyond my first thought. Abil- 
ity, learning and genius have marked and crowned the Century. I have 
been profoundly impressed with the truth that Divine Providence has 
favored Southern Methodism in the Commonwealth of Missouri. I have 
also been deeply impressed with the brevity of our life. We labor today 
and tomorrow we are in Eternity. During the Century, great and good 
men have labored among us, and, as a leaf, faded away. Likewise 
issues of the greatest moment at the time are buried with the years gone 
by. The silence of death reigns over the past. Let the Mantle of Charity 
fall upon the living and the departed. Vast eternity is before us. 

My debt of gratitude is due to Rev. Ward M. Baker who has had 
charge of the portrait department. He belongs to a family of artists, 
and he has done remarkably well in his department. His thanks are 
extended to the brethren for their kindly co-operation. My obligations 
are also acknowledged to Miss Kate Calnen, stenographer for the law 
firm of Lavelock & Kirkpatrick, Richmond, Mo. She has written copy 
for the printer, and all concerned are proud of her work. The brethren 
of the three Conferences have brought me under obligation to them for 
their many kindnesses and for their hearty co-operation. Their names 
are graven on the tablet of my memory. It is said of Charles Dickens 
that he was sorry to part company with the creations of his fancy, and I 
confess to a like feeling after the fellowship of two years with the 
brethren of Missouri. 

Marcus L. Gray. 

Richmond, Mo., June 14th, 1907 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




McKENDREE CHAPEL. 



REV JOHN TRAVIS, 

The first Itinerant Methodist Preacher in Missouri. 



The eye of Faith detects His prevision, provision, presidence, all 
Along the line of the march of the Ages. — Dr. Arthur T, Pierson. 



By Rev. W S. Woodard. 

About the middle of the Eighteenth century, Francis Travis came from Ireland 
to America and married in Pennsylvania. They were Presbyterians. He and his 
wife made their home in Chester District, South Carolina, where three sons and 
three daughters were born unto them. On the 3rd of November, 1773, a son was 
born whom they christened John, whose father died before he could remember him. 
Hence he was reared by a widowed mother. In early life he went to Kentucky where 
he was converted and joined the Methodist Church. In 1806, in his thirty-third year, 
he was received on trial by the Western Conference, which at that time embraced all 
of America west of the Alleghany Mountains, and was sent to Missouri Circuit. He 
was distinguished by being the first Methodist preacher who was ever sent west of 
the Mississippi river to lead men to God. Arthur, his older brother, was a Methodist 
exhorter, and Francis, his younger brother, was also a preacher and joined the 
Western Conference in 1810, traveled awhile, married, located and lived on a farm 
adjoining that of his brother John. One of his sons was a physician, one a preacher, 
one a farmer, and the other, occupation not known. His circuit in Missouri included 
St. Charles, St. Louis, Franklin, Washington, Jefferson, St. Genevieve and St. Francois 
Counties. His subsequent fields of labor were in Mississippi, Kentucky and Tennessee, 
in all of which he had great success. After traveling eight years he located, married 
Miss Cynthia Traylor of Kentucky, and settled on a farm in Livingston, now Critten- 
don County, Kentucky, where he lived till November 11th, 1852, when he went to his 
home in Heaven, aged seventy-nine years, forty-six of which he was a preacher. 
After he located he studied medicine, which he practiced till he went blind, fourteen 
years before he died. Although blind, he still preached as long as he was physically 
able to do so. He was the popular preacher of the country and always in demand for 
great occasions. Rev. G. W Hughey, D.D., furnished me a sketch of Dr. Travis 
for our Centennial service, from which I take the following: "I was born and reared 
in two miles of Dr. John Travis' home. He was the first Methodist preacher I ever 
saw or heard preach. He and his son were our family physicians in my childhood 
and youth. I was intimately acquainted with him. He was my first teacher in 
Methodist Theology. He was a remarkable man. He was endowed with large 
natural ability. His quick perception, and analytical turn of mind enabled him to 
seize a question and analyze it with great rapidity. He was the readiest man at reply 
I ever knew. This gave him tremendous power in debate, a very important qualifica- 
tion for a Methodist preacher of his day. In my youth I have sat for hours and 
heard him tell marvelous stories of the early preachers. Had he remained in the 
itineracy, he would have been a leading preacher of the pioneer church." 



A HUNDRED YEARS OF METHODISM IN MISSOURI. 



Bishop E. R. Hendrix. 

Just a century ago Nashville, Term., and St. Louis, Mo., were in the same district and 
William McKendree was presiding elder. It was the Cumberland District in the Western Con- 
ference. The Western Conference embraced what are now the states of Mississippi, Tennessee, 
Kentucky, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, to say nothing of Arkansas and Missouri, 
which were taken in that year. There were in it five districts, some embracing more than one 
state. Strong men belonged to the Western Conference, which never had a western boundary 
except the Day of Judgment. The General Conference was content with simply naming the 
eastern, southern and northern boundaries, so as not to interfere with other conference lines, 
and gave the Western Conference all west to the setting sun and everything beyond it, if the 
itinerant wanted to go there. The Western Conference was a name never absent from the 
annals of Methodism for a long period at a time, and even when it disappeared at the last 
session of our General Conference the name still survived by request in the "Western District." 
Among the honored names on the roll in 1806, when John Travis was appointed to the Missouri 
Circuit, were those of William McKendree, James Axley, Jesse Walker, Peter Cartwright and 
Learner Blackman. 

After a year's work in the Territory of Missouri, so recently acquired as part of the fam- 
ous Louisiana Purchase, John Travis reported in the fall of 1807 at the Western Conference, 
which met at Chillicothe, Ohio, that he had organized two circuits, one north of the Missouri 
river, which he called the Missouri Circuit, and one south, that he called the Meramec Circuit, 
and that, together, they numbered one hundred and six members. Travis ever had a warm 
place in his heart for this, his first work, for he had just been admitted on trial when appoint- 
ed to it. He returned from his remote appointment in the Mississippi District the next year to 
attend a camp meeting near St. Louis, in company with William McKendree and Jesse Walker, 
who walked forty-five miles to reach here. That was a notable company of preachers at the first 
camp meeting held in Missouri, and where they witnessed forty conversions. McKendree had 
been an officer in the Revolutionary War and was present at the surrender of Cornwallis, and 
as the first native-born American bishop, was to become its Chief Justice Marshall as well, the 
expounder of its constitution. Jesse Walker, who succeeded Travis as preacher in charge of the 
Missouri Circuit, was the Daniel Boone of Methodism, of whom it was said, "He was never lost 
and never complained," delighting to go where no white man had gone before him, a hero 
who, in the midst of the dense Romanist conditions of the Spanish and French population, was 
to pray St. Louis Methodism into existence nearly fourteen years after Travis began his work 
in the country. It was the privilege of Jesse Walker also to plant Methodism in Chicago. John 
Travis was a fearless man of vigorous mind who, after nine years of itinerant service, married 
and located, practicing medicine in Kentucky until some fourteen years before his death, when 
he became totally blind, still doing service as a local preacher and thrilling all in public and 
private with the story of his itinerant life. 

Not until 1814 was the "Missouri District" formed, with 804 members, and two years later 
the General Conference in Baltimore created the "Missouri Conference," bounded on the north 
by the Ohio Conference, on the east by the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, on the south by the 
Arkansas river, and on the west by nothing. In 1819 the first substantial and finished Meth- 
odist church ever erected in Missouri was built in Cape Girardeau county, two miles from Jack- 
son ; and here was held the first session of the Missouri Conference that was ever held within the 
present limits of the state, Bishop George presiding, it having fallen to the lot of Bishop Mc- 
Kendree to hold the first session after its organization, some three years before, when it met 
in Illinois. Not less than four sessions of the conference were held in this historic church dur- 
ing the next ten or twelve years. From the wood of this "mother church of Methodism in 
Missouri," a gavel was made, which was presented to the resident bishop in Missouri while 
in the chair of the General Conference recently held in Birmingham. 

When Missouri was admitted as a state in 1821 it had a population of 66,518, of whom 
10,222 were slaves. The Methodists numbered 1,543. It was not until 1836 that the Missouri 
Conference was confined to the limits of the state. The first General Conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, divided the state into two conferences, so that the name 
"Missouri Conference" was given to all that part of the state north of the Missouri river, as 
today. In the Methodist family there are now nearly 200,000 Missouri Methodists. 

When Jesse Walker determined to plant Methodism in St. Louis so formidable were the 
obstacles of a foreign and infidel population that, unable to get a start, he was deserted by the 
two brethren who accompanied him, and he himself left to look up the lost sheep in Missis- 
sippi. After riding eighteen miles in that direction,, he indulged in this soliloquy: "Was I 
ever defeated before in this blessed work? No; and, by the grace of God, I will go back and 
take St. Louis." Starting a school for their children, Walker got the eye and ear of the people 
and, amid indifference and opposition, he began his work as a preacher, having won another 
great victory over himself by a season of prayer in a "sink hole" grown up with tall James- 
town weeds, near the corner of Fourth and Pine streets, where the Planters' Hotel stands. 
Beginning with only six or eight hearers, he was able to report seventy members, the erection 
of a church during the year, and a successful camp meeting near the city, where William 
Finney and Mrs. Kells joined the church, to bs followed by others of a notable family of 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



loyal Methodists whose names have been perpetuated in the annals of Methodism in Missouri. 
St. Louis in that year — 1821 — had two church edifices, one of brick and one of wood, with some 
651 houses, mostly of wood, and a population of 5,500. In the next year Jesse Walker had the 
joy of seeing the first session of the Missouri Conference ever held in St. Louis assemble in the 
church which he had built. 

Shortly before Jesse Walker came to St. Louis, Bishop William Louis Dubourg, one of the 
greatest prelates of the Roman Catholic Church, removed his seat from New Orleans to St. 
Louis, and planted there what has since been known as the St. Louis University, one of the 
great strongholds of his church, which has grown with the growth of the city, largely from 
the increase in property values and zealous administration, part of the triple monument of a 
great servant of his church, who also founded the order of the Sisters of Charity of America 
and the Society for the Propagation of the Faith, with its headquarters in Lyons, France, and 
who died one of the archbishops of his church in France, the land of his birth. His name 
is worthy of mention here because of his ecclesiastical statemanship and his wise and far-reach- 
ing policy for securely planting his church in the largest city of the Louisiana Purchase and 
in a great future commonwealth of the American Union. 

One of the principal agents in the planting of Methodism in Missouri, William McKen- 
dree, in whose district the whole territory of Missouri was placed at the session of the Western 
Conference, in 1806, lived to preside over some four sessions of the Missouri Conference, the 
last as late as 1824, eight years after the death of Asbury. Bishop Asbury, with a rare 
sagacity in selecting leaders, had sent McKendree in 1801 across the mountains from his native 
Virginia to be presiding elder of the Kentucky District and to have a sort of general superintend- 
ence of the large Western Conference. Always in the van and on the firing line, McKendree 
was chosen again by Asbury, in 1806, to preside over the new district, which was to embrace 
all the inhabited part of the Louisiana Purchase, it being attached to the Cumberland District, 
which included much of Middle Tennessee and some of Illinois. McKendree was a man of 
genius, to whom the conquest of the Mississippi Valley for Christ is largely due, and the 
numerous ''McKendree" churches and chapels, reaching from Missouri to the Atlantic seaboard, 
are the monuments of his labors in many states that were only territories in his day. 

But what shall we say of Francis Asbury, who, like Moses, looked over into the Prom- 
ised Land, so recently acquired from France and Spain, but himself never entered it. His 
heart was ever with his "beloved McKendree" as he fondly called him. At the session of the 
Western Conference, where he presided in 1806, and appointed the first preacher to the Mis- 
souri Circuit," his journal records his zeal for the frontier work in these simple words : "The 
brethren were in want, so I parted with my watch, my coat, and my shirt." We naturally ask 
what did he have left out of his $64 a year salary. Who can question that his heart went 
with his gift? "Silver and gold I have none," well might, this apostle say, "but such as I have 
give I unto thee." We claim Asbury, too, as among the founders of Methodism on this side of 
the Mississippi. "In diligent activity no apostle, no missionary, no warrior, ever surpassed 
him. He rivalled Melancthon and Luther in boldness. He combined the enthusiasm of Xavier, 
with the far-reaching foresight and keen discrimination of Wesley." His mantle fell upon 
McKendree, who survived him nearly twenty years, but their names are inseparable, as was 
their work. "My fathers, my fathers, the chariots of Israel and the horsemen thereof!" 

Honored names are they of ministers and laymen who, during the past hundred years, have 
been connected with Methodism in Missouri. Some have become bishops of the church and edu- 
cators and editors, and some have been Governors and United States Senators and members of 
Congress. Others without public office have been the foremost citizens of their counties, always 
interested in every good word and work. Large gifts have come to our Methodism from those 
not of our communion in the belief that we would wisely administer them. The largest is a 
bequest by the late Robert A. Barnes of St. Louis, who married Miss Louise De Mun, a daugh- 
ter of a leading Roman Catholic family, who was in hearty sympathy with him in his purpose 
to found a great hospital under Methodist auspices. For this there has already been purchased 
the finest site in St. Louis, having a frontage of some 1,200 feet on Forest Park, and it is the 
intention of the trustees to retain not less than 1,000,000 of the bequest as an endowment after 
completing and equipping the best hospital of its kind in the land. 

Not until after Methodism had been doing evangelistic work in Missouri for fully fifty years 
did it undertake to found a college of highest grade. Had our fathers known how greatly this 
child of their prayers and sacrifices would be imperiled by the Civil War they might have 
hesitated to begin the work when they did. It has come to us as a sacred heritage from their 
hands. It is an interesting fact that while this article is being read a great educational con- 
vention is being held in St. Louis, under the auspices of the General Board of Education of our 
church, that may help to deepen the interest in Christian education, not alone in Missouri, but 
in those states that sent us Travis and Walker and McKendree a hundred years ago. 

It is an interesting fact that the Centennial of Methodism in Missouri and the Semi-Cen- 
tennial of Central College are co-incident. It was this fact that led to the projection of this 
volume on its present scale that it might contain fitting memorials of the leading actors of a 
century of Methodism in Missouri in whatever department of work for the Master, Much 
credit is due to the tireless and self-sacrificing servants of the Church, Rev. M. L. Gray and Rev. 
Ward M. Baker, who have made possible this beautiful memorial volume. 

Norledge Place, Kansas City, Mo. 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



BISHOP EUGENE RUSSELL HENDRIX, D.D. LL.D. 



Nil actum reputans si quid superesset agendum. — Lucan. 

He recon'd not the past, while aught remain'd 
Great to be done, or mighty to be gained. — Rowe. 



Bishop Eugene Russell Hen- 
drix was born in Fayette, Mis- 
souri, May 17th, 1847. He was 
born and reared in a Methodist 
home, both parents, Adam Hen- 
drix and Isabel J. Hendrix, be- 
ing members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He 
was converted during a great re- 
vival held in Fayette, Missouri, 
March 14th, 1859, and joined 
the church the same date under 
the ministry of Rev. S. W. Cope. 
He was the first penitent in the 
great revival held at Fayette 
that spring; he had been under 
conviction since the previous 
spring, but supposed he vvas too 
young to ask for the prayers of 
the Church; his mother knelt by 
him as he gave his heart to God. 
His religious life was deeply- 
quickened when he felt called to 
preach the Gospel, and his life 
as a student for forty-five years 
has led him ever nearer to God. 
He was licensed to preach in 
Middletown, Connecticut, when 
a student at the Wesleyan Uni- 
versity from 1864 to 1867; Rev. 
J. J. Pegg being the preacher in 
charge. He was recommended 
for admission on trial by the 
Quarterly Conference at Leavan- 
worth, Kansas, where he was 
serving as a supply in the sum- 
mer of 1869, and was received 
into the Missouri Conference in 

1869; Rev. W. M. Rush, D.D., Presiding Elder, and Bishop Geo. F. Pierce, presiding. 
He was ordained deacon by Bishop Pierce in his room at Chillicothe, Missouri, in 
1869, the Bishop being unable to preach or attend the public services on that day; 
was ordained Elder by Bishop H. N. McTyeire in September, 1870, at Leavenworth, 
Kansas. The appointments filled are: Leavenworth, Kansas, 1869-1870; Macon, Mis- 
souri, 1870-1872; Francis St., St. Joseph, Missouri, 1872-1876. Missionary tour around 
the world, 1876-1877; Glasgow, Missouri, 1877-1878. President of Central College 
from 1878 to 1886. Elected and ordained Bishop in 1886. Several hundred persons 
were received into the church under his ministry while pastor from 1869 to 1878, 
and he has ordained more than one thousand deacons and elders. He attended 
Central College until it was suspended during the Civil War, then the Wesleyan 
University at Middleton, Connecticut, where he was graduated in 1867; he attended 
also the Union Theological Seminary, New York, graduating from there in 1869. 
He was married to Miss Anne E. Scarritt, June 20th, 1872, and his children are: 
Mrs. Evangeline I. Waring, Mrs. Mary M. Simpson, Nathan Scarritt Hendrix and 
Helen C. Hendrix. He considers the founding of the Korean Mission as being possibly 
the most important event in his life. Liddon's Bampton Lectures on the Divinity of 
Our Lord, Shedd's Works, also those of Dr. H. B. Smith, old professors of his, are 
some of the books aside from the Bible that have been most helpful to him. 




10 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



BISHOP ENOCH MATHER MARVIN, D.D. 



When the great Coronation Day of our Lord Jesus Christ comes, 
I would like to be living, and lay my Crown at His feet. — Queen 
Victoria. 



Enoch Mather Marvin was 
born in Warren County, Mis- 
souri, June 12th, 1823. Cath- 
arine Mather was the mother of 
his grandfather, Enoch Marvin. 
Both families were of English 
descent. Reinold Marvin, who 
came to America about 1637 
from Essex County, was bap- 
tized in St. Mary's church, Great 
Bently Parish, England, June 
7th, 1593. This old church was 
built in 1089 by Alberic de 
Vere, a favorite of William the 
Conqueror, and founder of the 
family long enjoying the title of 
Earl of Oxford. At first a pri- 
vate chapel, it came at last by 
successive assignments under 
the patronage of the Bishops of 
St. Albans. Here many of our 
ancestors worshiped, and their 
bones rest about its consecrated 
walls. 

Amid the rude surrondings of 
a Missouri farm near a century 
ago Enoch Mather Marvin was 
reared. His parents were lovers 
of learning, and he early evinced 
a longing for books. Awake to 
nature, too, every voice of earth 
or sky struck a responsive chord 
in his sensitive soul. In person 
tall and angular, long of neck 
and limb, leaning forward as he 
walked; large feet, slender, 
white hands, pale face, rather 
high cheek bones, eye between 
nazel and gray, slightly drooping eyelids, black hair, high forehead, voice full and 
deep yet mellow. 

His mental grasp was quick, strong, comprehensive; the organizing and executive 
faculties were not wanting. Both the analytic and synthetic seemed to be the natural 
mode of his mind's working, and his contemplative disposition carried him into the 
highest regions of human thought. 

At times his preaching became rapturous and was laden with a strange, magnetic 
influence that cannot be described, and a pathos whose power was irresistible; yet all 
the while one felt that his thoughts had been guided by a sober judgment, and his 
emotions had not borne him beyond the limits of self-control. His imaginative powers 
he kept under strict surveillance, and in his most enthusiastic moods was economical 
with language. Betrayed into no wild flights of fluent fancy he packed his thoughts 
into the fewest words, and every sentence became a glowing picture. 

In the social circle his rich humor often gave forth "flashes of merriment that 
were wont to set the table on a roar." Too sincere to be adroit, he yet, in his 
dealing with men, avoided many difficulties by a tact that was born of love. 

For family and friends he would have given his life; to an enemy generous, yet 
prompt to condemn what he thought unjust, and while sensitive to a wrong he' was 
above retaliation. 

Unselfishly and humbly, yet faithfully and fearlessly he sought to do his life work. 
His love for God and men was the heart-throb of his being, and the flame of his zeal" 
consumed his life. Stricken with pneumonia at his home in St. Louis, he sank gently 
into his last sleep about 4 o'clock on Monday morning, November 26th, 1877. 

Perhaps the greatest work of his useful life was what he did for Central College 
Fayette, Missouri. To this institution of learning he was thoroughly devoted, and the 
results have justified his endeavor. 




CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



11 




QUEEN VICTORIA. 
Quoted in connection with the life of Bishop E. M. Marvin. 



12 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




BISHOP JOSEPH STAUNTON KEY, D.D. 



I bent before Thy gracious throne, 

And asked for peace with suppliant knee; 

And peace was given — nor peace alone, 

But faith, and hope, and ecstacy. — Wordsworth. 



Bishop Key made the Centennial appointments, 1906, which follow in this volume. 
He was the highly honored presiding officer of the Missouri Conference in 1906 and 
again in 1907. He was born in La Grange, Georgia, July 18th, 1829. His father, 
Rev. Caleb Witt Key, was a Methodist itinerant, and he spent his youth in the bounds 
of his father's pastorate. His mother, Elizabeth Key, was a woman of strong and 
richly endowed character. He had advantage of schools and academies. He graduated 
from Emory College, Oxford, Georgia, in 1848, receiving the A. B. degree. He after- 
wards obtained A. M. Licensed to preach in 1848, and joined the Georgia Conference 
in 1849. He was a pastor and presiding elder in the Georgia and South Georgia Con- 
ferences until elected Bishop in 1886. He received the honorary degree of D.D. from 
the University of Georgia. He has presided over the Missouri Conferences twice, and 
under appointment for the third time. 

He was married to Miss Susie M. Snyder in 1851. She died in 1891. In 1893 
he married Mrs. Lucy Kidd, who has for more than twenty years been the successful 
President of North Texas Female College, Sherman, Texas. 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



13 



REV WILLIAM FLETCHER McMURRY, D.D. 



Faith puts us into immediate communication with God and with 
The highest range of facts in the Universe. — Bishop Marvin. 




Rev. W. F. Mc- 
Murry, son of Rev. 
William Wesley Mc- 
Murry and Mary 
Elizabeth McMurry, 
was born five miles 
west of Shelbyville, 
Missouri, June 29th, 
1864. He was con- 
verted at Fayette, 
Missouri, under the 
influences of Rev. B. 
D. Sipple and Mr. P. 
S. Rader, students at 
Central College, in 

1884. He was li- 
censed to preach 
April 13th, 1885, by 
the Fayette Quarter- 
ly Conference, Rev. 
J. H. Ledbetter 
preacher in charge, 
and Rev. J. A. Mum- 
power, Presiding El- 
der ; recommended to 
the Annual Confer- 
ence for admission 
on trial in the sum- 
mer of 1886, by the 
same Quarterly Con- 
ference; received in- 
to the Annual Con- 
ference on trial in 
the fall of 1886, at 
the session of the 
Missouri Conference 
held at St. Joseph, 
Missouri; Rev. J. A. 
Mumpower, Presid- 
ing Elder, and Rev. H. N. McTyeire, Bishop; ordained Elder by Bishop E. R. 
Hendrix September 9th, 1888, at Gallatin, Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop Joseph 
S. Key, September 14th, 1890. Appointments served: Hundley Church, St. Joseph, 
Missouri, 1886-1889; Macon Station, 1889-1893; Richmond Station, 1893-1897; St. 
Joseph District, 1897-1901; St. Louis Conference, St. Louis District, 1901-1902; Cen- 
tenary Church, St. Louis, 1902-1906; Corresponding Secretary Board of Church Exten- 
tension, 1906. Between four and five thousand persons have been received into the 
church under his ministry. The Macon church was rebuilt during his pastorate there, 
and he had to do with the building of several churches in his districts. His education 
was received at the public schools, St. Charles College and Central College. He was 
married to Miss Frances Byrd Davis, October 9th, 1888, and they have three children, 
Mary Claudia McMurry, William Fletcher McMurry and Frances McMurry. Dr. Mc- 
Murry made a remarkable record as Presiding Elder of St. Joseph District, and on 
the St. Louis District. His four years' pastorate of Centenary Church, St. Louis, was 
distinguished by the reception of a large number of people into the church, over two 
thousand new members. He enters upon his work as Corresponding Secretary of the 
General Board of Church Extension under most favorable auspices. 



14 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JOSEPH HENRY PRITCHETT, D.D. 



The Conversion of the world to Jesus Christ is the most 
Stupendous enterprise that was ever conceived by the Mind of 
Man. — Bishop Hoss. 



Joseph Henry Pritchett was 
born of Methodist parents, 
Henry Pritchett and Martha 
Myra Pritchett, in Henry 
County, Virginia, February 8th, 
1835. He was converted and 
received into the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, under 
the ministry of Rev. W W. Red- 
man, Rev. George Smith and 
Rev. D. T. Sherman at old 
Shiloh Church in St. Charles 
County, Missouri, in 1848. He 
says there was nothing unusual 
in his conversion, and that his 
growth in grace was simply the 
ups and downs of a common 
farmer boy followed by those of 
an ordinary man. He was 
licensed to preach by the Quar- 
terly Conference of Flint Hill 
charge, August, 1855; Rev. W 
A. Mayhew was preacher in 
charge, and Rev. E. M. Marvin, 
Presiding Elder; was recom- 
mended for admission on trial 
into the Annual Conference by 
the same Quarterly Conference 
in 1855; and was received into 
the Annual Conference on trial 
that same year; Rev. E. M. Mar- 
vin, Presiding Elder, and Bishop 
John Early, presiding; ordained 
Deacon at the Annual Confer- 
ence held in Glasgow, Missouri, 
September, 1857, by Bishop 
James O. Andrew; ordained 
Elder by Bishop Robert Paine 
at Tecumseh, Kansas, in 1859. Dr. Pritchett, from his admission on trial into the 
Annual Conference, has been one of the most faithful and trusted men of our Meth- 
odism. He has served in order the following appointments: Tecumseh, Kansas, 1855- 
1856; Council Grove, Kansas, 1856-1858; Leavenworth, Kansas, 1858-1860; Sturgeon 
Circuit, Missouri Conference, 1860-1861; Flint Hill Circuit, St. Charles District, 1861- 
1862; Cottleville Circuit, 1862-1864; St. Charles Station, 1864; in Montana during 
1865-1866; Warrenton Circuit, 1866-1867; St. Charles District, 1867-1869; Weston Sta- 
tion, 1869-1870; Hannibal Station, 1870-1872; Glasgow Station, 1872-1874; Fayette Dis- 
trict, 1874-1876; Howard Payne College, 1876-1881; Pritchett Institute, 1881-1884; 
Paynesville Institute and pastor of Troy and Wentzville, 1884-1886; Central College 
and pastor Roanoke Circuit, 1886-1888; Macon District, 1888-1892; Moberly Station, 
1892-1894; Mexico Station, 1894-1896; St. Joseph District, 1896-1897; Gallatin Dis- 
trict, 1897-1898; Missionary Secretary, 1898-1902; Mexico District, 1902-1904; Fulton 
Station, 1904-1905; Supernumerary, 1905-1906. He received his education at Howard 
High School and Marvin's Brush College. He was married to Miss Mary Jane Johnson, 
April 9th, 1857, and they have the following children, William Henry Pritchett, Wal- 
ter McAnally Pritchett, Robert Lee Spencer Pritchett, Stonewall Pritchett, John 
Thomas Pritchett, Joseph Johnson Pritchett, Granville Morrison Pritchett, and Paul 
Livingstone Pritchett. Dr. Pritchett is one of our great, good men. 




ST. LOUIS CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



15 



REV DAVID RICE McANALLY, D.D. 



'Tis Immortality, 'tis that alone, 
The soul can comfort, elevate and fill. 



-Young. 



Fitzgerald. 



By Bishop 0. P 
Our Dr. McAnally was a na- 
tive of East Tennessee. There 
the hills are high and rugged, 
the streams are many and spark- 
ling, the woods are beautifully 
timbered, the sky is lofty, while 
now and then a mountain peak 
shoots its head away above the 
clouds and fogs that roll below. 
The tonic of the East Tennessee 
breezes was in Dr. McAnally's 
veins. He had drunk of its 
springs. It is not at all strange 
that he never forgot that ro- 
mantic land of his birth. But 
he gave himself wholly to Mis- 
souri. He out-Missouried Mis- 
souri itself, if I may say so. 
The Missourians took to him. 
There was in him a frankness, 
an outspoken devotion to the 
truth as he saw it, a watchful- 
ness that never slumbered when 
a polemic foe threatened the en- 
campments of Missouri Meth- 
odism. Blessed old Missouri! 
The rank and file of our people 
believed in him, looked to him 
for the defense of what was 
most sacred to their souls, and 
were ready to stand by him in 
any contest where denomina- 
tional banners waved over hos- 
tile ranks. 

Dr. McAnally as an editor 
filled a large place in Missouri 
Methodism. He magnified his 
office as defender of the faith 

during long and stormy years. As a watchman upon Zion's walls, he was steady 
at his post. An open enemy he repelled promptly and effectually. The brother 
who was a dreamer and a speculator, a floater on the smoky sea where so many 
have lost their bearings, he met with his one remedy for doubt and diluted theology, 
namely: Thus saith the Lord. Dr. McAnally took the sacred book, the sacred 
volume as it was given; it was a light to his path and a lamp to his feet. 
He did not exert his ingenuity in attempts to make the Bible mean nothing in par- 
ticular; the higher criticism, so-called, had not wrought the wonders of stultification 
since achieved. The plenary inspiration of the Bible was to him a truth of transcend- 
ent importance; his faith was unwavering, and his peace was full. 

David Rice McAnally was born in Grainger County, Tennessee, February 17th, 
1810. He was admitted into the Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church as a 
traveling preacher at Abbingdon, Va., in 1829. After twelve years of service on circuits 
and stations, he was called to the presidency of the East Tennessee Female Institute in 
Knoxville, in which place he remained eight years. In 1851 he was elected editor of 
the "Christian Advocate" in St. Louis, Missouri. He had been since 1840 indirectly 
connected with the press in North Carolina and Tennessee. He published various tracts 
and pamphlets on educational and controversial subjects, and for several years was 
connected with Horace Mann and others in the endeavor to improve the common school 
system of the country. He is the author of sketches of the "Life and Character of 
Mrs. Ramsey," "Life and Times of William Patton," and "Life and Times of Samuel 
Patton," and other works. 

He died in 1895, aged 85 years, having been a minister of the Gospel for 67 years. 
He suffered long and severely before his death and illustrated by invincible patience 
and unflagging hope, the power of the truth so long preached by him by voice and 
through the printed page. 

Nashville, Tennessee. 




16 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. WILLIAM BEVERLY PALMORE, D.D. 



He gaes far afield, and taks us tae strange lands when he's on 
His travels, but ye'ill acknowledge that he gaithers mony 
Treasures, and he aye comes back tae Christ. — Ian Maclaren. 

William Beverly Palmore was 
born in Fayette County, Tenn- 
essee; his father died when he 
was only six weeks old, but the 
Christian mother, strengthened 
by her communion with the In- 
finite, guided his youthful feet 
in the ways of God, so that he 
grew up in unhesitating accept- 
ance of the truths of 
Christianity. 

At fourteen years of age the 
family removed to Missouri and 
settled on a farm near Malta 
Bend in Saline County and here 
as in Tennessee he continued to 
learn and practice that economy 
and industry which compara- 
tive poverty necessitated. His 
early educational advantages 
were only such as were offered 
by the common schools of the 
country. 

When yet a boy, being only 
.17, he entered the Confederate 
Army where he remained until 
the close of the great struggle. 
He was with General Marma- 
duke until the surrender at 
Shreveport and although oc- 
cupying the peculiarly danger- 
ous position of standard bearer 
he went through battle and 
skirmish unscathed to the end. 

Returning to Missouri he went 

into business in Waverly in 

1866, in which he continued with 

good success until the pressure 

of the Divine Hand indicating another field of endeavor became so strong that he 

obeyed the summons. 

He was converted at eighteen, but made little if any progress in the divine life 
until as a teacher in the Sunday school at Waverly he was fully awakened to the 
need of greater consecration. Feeling that he was called to the ministry he entered 
Vanderbilt at the opening of that institution when the buildings were as yet unfinished. 
Here he remained for several years in association with men, many of whom rose to 
eminence in the Church. Among his intimate friends was the lamented Bishop Tigert. 
As a member of the South West Missouri Conference his ability was at once 
recognized, and because of this he was from the beginning assigned to fields that 
were difficult and responsibilities that were heavy. In this relation his entire history 
was a history of success and wherever he labored the Church was built up in its 
material interests and its membership as well. Needless to say he was loved and 
honored everywhere. 

A relentless foe to tobacco and whiskey he has lived an abstemious and economical 
life, using the means which his talent and industry have won to promote the cause 
of God and the kingdom of His Son. His Christian generosity has touched the work 
of God at so many points that they cannot be enumerated. It may be noted that 
the foundations of two of the greatest and most successful missionary enterprises 
of the Church were laid by him; the Palmore Institute at Kobe, Japan, and the 
Colegio Palmore at Chihuahua, Mexico. Here almost a thousand students are annually 
gathered under the fostering influences of Christianity. 

Since 1890 Dr. Palmore has been the Editor and Manager of the St. Louii 
Christian Advocatee, and in this position has accomplished a work and achieved a 
reputation exceeded by few in the history of the world. 




ST. LOUIS CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



17 



REV CHARLES CARROL WOODS, D.D. 



Yet so much bounty is in God, such grace, that who advance His 
Glory, not their own, them He Himself to glory will 
Advance. — Milton. 



Rev. Charles Carrol Woods, son 
of Samuel H. Woods and Sicily 
Woods, was born in Rocky Mount, 
Virginia, July 4th, 1838. He was 
converted at a country church in 
Franklin County, Virginia, when 
about fifteeen years of age, under 
the ministry of Rev. J. W. Lewis, 
and joined the church at that 
time. His father's home was the 
stopping place of all the preach- 
ers, and frequently services were 
had there. Always religiously in- 
clined, he was deeply impressed in 
a revival meeting held by the 
pastor, Rev. J. W. Lewis, and 
that night about midnight he 
found peace in the crucified Lord. 
He was licensed to preach in 
August, 1861, by the Quarterly 
Conference of Versailles Circuit, 
at that time in the St. Louis, but 
now the South-West Missouri 
Conference; Rev. W. M. Protts- 
man was Presiding Elder, and 
Rev. T. J. Smith preacher in 
charge; the same Quarterly Con- 
ference recommended him to the 
Annual Conference for admission 
on trial, and he was received into 
the Annual Conference with 
Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh presid- 
ing; ordained Deacon by Bishop E. 
M. Marvin, at Kansas City, Mo., in 
1867; ordained Elder by Bishop H. 
H. Kavanaugh at Jefferson City, 
Missouri, in 1868. Appointments 
filled: Marshall Circuit, Ver- 
sailles Circuit, Jefferson City, 
Mo., New Madrid Circuit, War- 
rensburg Station, Harrisonville 
Station, Boonville Station, Jef- 
ferson City Station, Boonville District, Walnut St. Kansas City, Mo., Lydia Ave. (now 
Central), Kansas City, Kansas City Dist., Nevada Station, Pres. of Scarritt Collegiate 
Institute eight years, Springfield, St. Paul's, and with St. Louis Christian Advocate 
after 1898. The church at Warrensburg, Jefferson City, Harrisonville Circuit (church 
and parsonage), Kansas City (church and parsonage), and many others were all built 
under his pastorate, and many churches and parsonages repaired and improved, and 
many old debts paid. His education was received at the country primary schools, at 
Trinity College, North Carolina, and at Central College, Fayette, Missouri He 
received the degree of D. D. from Trinity in 1877. He was married to Miss Anna 
M. Nicholds in July, 1866, and their children are as follows: Dr. Samuel H Woods, 
Charles R. Woods, Dr. E. A. Woods, Mrs. Minnie C. Hall, Mrs. Bess M. Childs, Mrs. 
Nellie Stuckey, and Miss Mabel Woods. Some of the books which have helped him 
most, aside from the Bible, are Baxter's "Call," and "Saint's Rest," and Mosheim s 
History. Dr. Woods has dedicated a great many churches, and has given quite a 
good deal of attention to Masonry, having been Grand Master, Grand High Priest, 
and also Grand Prelate for some thirteen years. He feels he has been able to accom- 
plish much good by association with the Masonic fraternity. 




18 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 

THE ST. LOUIS CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



The open Bible, the living ministry, our Methodist Schools, and the St. Louis 

Christian Advocate, have been four potent factors in the development of Imperial 

Missouri. The Advocate, during its nearly three score years of history, has had but 

few editors. For more than three decades Dr. D. R. McAnally was editor-in-chief. 

For nearly two decades Dr. W- B. Palmore has borne the burden of responsibility, both 

editorial and financial. The Bible may remain dust-covered and unopened, the pastor, 

from storm or sickness, may fail in his regular rounds, but the St. Louis Advocate, 

fresh, versatile and broadly intelligent in its wealth of information, is as regular a3 

the sun in its weekly greetings of the household. Whatever else may fail, the 

Advocate makes its bow and invites the family to a bountiful feast of good things 

provided in its freighted columns. During rainy Sundays and stormy nights, the 

Advocate is on hand to give the shut-ins, the tired housewife, the weary father, or 

the restless children, a profitable and delightful hour, The far-reaching and mighty 

activities of the church among men are faithfully reported for the help of those 

striving to practice the principles of our holy religion. The Advocate stands as a 

break- water against the inflowing tides of worldliness; it sounds the alarm at the 

approach of danger; it strikes with a mailed hand the brazen head of sin in the 

high and low places of life; and it stands amid the confusion of strange tongues, 

contending earnestly for the faith once delivered to the Saints. The Advocate is 

the church's throne of power, her right arm of strength, her beacon light upon the 

watch tower, and her herald of victory on the field of conquest. The Advocate is 

pledged to the speedy overthrow of King Alcohol, opium and war! And to the 

sending of the gospel to all the world during the present century. For these and many 

other reasons it should be placed in every Methodist home. The Advocate has 

A BOOK STORE 
from which its readers can order good books of almost every variety, such as Family, 
Teachers', Pulpit, Old Folks' and Children's Bibles, Hymn Books, Sunday School 
Supplies, Church and Quarterly Conference Records, Church Registers, Maps, Black 
Boards, Marriage and Baptismal Certificates, Collection Envelopes, Communion Sets, 
Reward Cards, Collection Boxes, Globes and Lesson Helps, New Century Knight 
Charts, Songs and Badges. The Advocate is also recognized as one of the most 
valuable advertising mediums west of the Mississippi river, or in the entire south. 
All preachers are authorized agents for the St. Louis Christian Advocate, which is 
now recognized as one of the largest, most vigorous and expensive religious papers 
in the entire South. Each copy costs Two Dollars a year to make it, but it is sent 
to all preachers, who act as its agents, for half price, or only One Dollar a year. 
In order to introduce it into new homes, it will be sent in clubs of ten, to new sub- 
scribers, for just half the cost to make it, which is less than a two-cent postage 
stamp each week, or One Dollar a year. No subscription can be renewed at this 
rate. This offer at half the cost to make it is at a great sacrifice to introduce it 
into new homes. Address all communications and orders to W- B. Palmore, 1414 
Locust Street, St. Louis, Mo. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



19 



CENTRAL COLLEGE PRESIDENTS. 




1. Rev. N. Scarritt, D-D. 2. Rev. A. A. Morrison, D.D. 3. Rev. W- H. Anderson, D.D. 
President 1857-8 President 1858-60 President 1860-61 




4. Rev. W A. Smith, D. D. 5. Rev. J. C. Wills, D. D. 6. Bishop E. R. Hendrix, D. D. 
President 1868-70 President 1871-78 President 1878-86 



20 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE PRESIDENTS— Continued 




Rev. J. D. Hammond, D. D. 
President 1888-96. 



T. S. Dines, A. M. 
President 1896-97 



E. B. Craighead, LL. D. 
President 1897-1901 




1. J. W Ktlpatbick. A. M., Prof. Biology and Geology 1880-1904 

2. T. Berry Smith, A.M., Prof. Chem. and Phys. since 1886 and Act. Pres. 1901-03 

3. O. H. P. Corprew, A. M. LL. D., Prof. Anc. Languages 1871 and Acting Pres. 1886-88 

4. Rev. James C. Morris, D. D., President June 1903-1907 

5. Rev. R. T. Bond, A. M., Prof. Mathematics and Astronomy since 1886 



CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



21 




PROF. WILLIAM ALEXANDER WEBB, A. M. 



President of Central College, Fayette, Mo. 



All the wealth of past Wisdom, all the treasuries of Future 
Hope; ours to study now, ours to possess hereafter. 

— Canon Farrar. 



William A. Webb, eldest child of Richard Stanford and Jennie Clegg Webb, was 
born in Durham, N. C, July 30, 1867. His father was admitted to the North Carolina 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in 1859, and continue^ in 
active service in that and in the Western North Carolina Conference until the time 
of his death in 1901, serving during the Civil War as Chaplain of the Forty-Fourth 
North Carolina Regiment, C. S. A. 

Prepared for college by his uncles, Messrs. W. R. and J. M. Webb, now of Bell 
Buckle, Tenn., he entered Vanderbilt University in 1887 and graduated four years 
later with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. After another year of study in 1he 
University and three years of teaching in the Webb School, he spent two years in 
foreign travel and study in the University of Leipsic. In 1897 he became principal 
of Central Academy, and two years later was elected Professor of English in Central 
College, which position he has since held, spending the year 1903-'04 (by permission 
of the college authorities) in graduate study in the University of Berlin. During 
the absence of President James C. Morris, 1906-'07, he served as Acting President of 
Central College. He was married January 31, 1899, to Miss Mary Lee Clary of Bell 
Buckle, Tenn., and has three children. 

He has contributed to the ''Methodist Quarterly Revieiv" and "South Atlantic 
Quarterly," and is the author of "Richard Malcolm Johnston" in Baskerville's "Southern 
Writers." He was elected President of Central College, Fayette, Mo., at a meeting of 
the Board of Curators held in St. Louis, on April 23d, 1907. 



22 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



ATTENDANCE MAP OF MISSOURI. 



ATTENDANCE* COUNTIES 



2-v CENTRAL COLLEGE- FAYETTE- MO 

*±L]W 1857-1907 



^ i V lT * North 

45 ?A South \ 

s^«ij/g^Lt-v Howard 



92 IffllWO 

91 or 



ft TRANSIENT ^ EAR5 



980 
794 
829 

EXTRA mo. 227J 20. 
T0T4L.I283O 2S4 

COMPfLED BY 

T.B.S. 

MARCH I9Q7 




This cut very appropriately appears in connection with the semi-centennial state- 
ments made herewith. It shows at a glance the attendance for fifty years as dis- 
tributed by counties in Missouri and by States adjoining. The smaller figures indicate 
the number of graduates in each case. The map was compiled by Prof. T. Berry 
Smith, and is deemed to be quite authentic, being based on the records of catalogues 
and matriculation books. About one-fourth of those credited to Howard County 
were transient and should be distributed among the other counties, in the ratio of 
five north of the Missouri river to four south of it. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



23 




O 



<D 



O 
W 

O 

o3 



-+J 




03 




£ 




O 




rC 




w 




>» 




<u 




rC 




H 




tn 




u 




o 




• l—t 




Jh 




o» 




+-> 




a 


. 


• rH 


0» 




bjo 


'rt 


a> 


C 


S 


01 


o 




U 


W 




?h 




O 


o3 


rH 


U 


0) 


h-> 




3 


X 


0> 


0) 


O 



-8° 

*£ S 

° OJ 

•+J o 

•rH 

£ I 

o 

o 

oi 
aT 
o 



Tfl 



a> 



j> 
'a; 

> 
o3 



24 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



CAMPUS VIEW 




This view is taken from the southwest corner of the Campus. It shows in the 
foreground some of the stately trees that, in well-chosen variety, bestud the grounds. 
The walk seen is made of the refuse from a coal mine, which, after being thrown out, 
passed through a process of spontaneous combustian and thereby became brick red. 
The contrast with the green of the turf is very pleasing. In the background may 
be seen portions of the Academy and of Cupples Hall to the right, and of Centenary 
Chapel to the left. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



25 



"OLD BUILDING." 




The "Old Building," once called "Library Hall," and now known as the "Academy," 
was erected in 1856. Two other buildings preceded it on the same site; the first 
one burned in 1838, and the second one in 1854. In this building all the work of 
the institution was carried on until June, 1886. In its chapel were held also for 
many years the services of the local congregation of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. During the Civil War it was occupied as a barracks by the Federal troops 
and by them was greatly abused. After the war it was repaired, and it is still in 
an excellent state of preservation. The building is used at present as a study 
hall and for recitation rooms by the preparatory classes of the college. 



26 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE, 
FAYETTE, MO. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 



The city of Fayette is the capital of Howard county, one of the best and 
earliest settled counties of Central Missouri. Fayette was laid oat at the time of 
the last visit of Lafayette to the United States, and was named in honor of that 
illustrious son of France. Surrounded by people from the older commonwealths of 
Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee, it very soon became the seat of excellent private 
schools. In 1839-40, when the State Commissioners, traveling on horseback, visited 
the counties of Cooper, Saline, Howard and Boone, they came near choosing Fayette 
as the seat of the new University. 

In 1844 there came to Fayette from McKendree College, Illinois, a young man 
named William T. Lucky. He and his wife began a school which they called Howard 
High School, and which grew as the years rolled on. He had as associates in his 
work during those years several men who left their imprint on many, many lives. 
They were William T. Davis, Nathan Scarritt and Carr W- Pritchett. 

The fame of Fayette as an educational center was such that a delegated 
convention of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in session in St. Louis in April, 
1853, selected it as the seat of "a literary institution of the highest order." The 
following autumn curators were appointed by the St. Louis and Missouri conferences, 
who held their first meeting on December 9, 1853, to devise ways and means for 
opening the proposed new college. They adjourned without taking any definite steps, 
but were called together again sooner than they expected. On the twenty-sixth of 
January, 1854, the Howard High School was burned and on February 4 a joint 
session of the Trustees and of the new Board of Curators was held in Fayette. 
At this session arrangements were made whereby the present site of the "Old 
Building" was transferred to the new board. This was the beginning of the Campus 
which at present comprises about twenty-five acres. The board evidently began its 
corporate existence in this year because the great seal of the college bears the words, 
"Incorporated 1854," but the charter bears date March 1, 1855, and it was accepted 
and adopted by the board in December, 1855. A stately building (the one still 
standing) was erected on the site of the burned one in 1856, and in this building the 
formal opening of Central College began in September, 1857. Rev. Nathan Scarritt, 
President, and Rev. Carr W Pritchett, Principal, assistant. They took the boys and 
left the young ladies in the High School with Mr. Lucky, who in 1859 secured a 
charter changing the name to Howard Female College (now Howard Payne College). 
Rev. C. W. Pritchett still abides and lives near Independence, Mo. See sketch and 
cut elsewhere in this book. 

The last ante-bellum minutes of the Board of Central bear date June 17, 1861, 
and the first post-bellum June 4, 1867. The ravages of war had swept over the land 
and the college building had been used as barracks and hospital. 

October 29, 1867, there was held in St. Louis a joint session of Conference com- 
mittees and a new Board of Curators, five from each Conference, came into existence. 
On June 11, 1868, they elected Rev. William A. Smith, D.D., President, and he 
set about raising an endowment fund of $100,000, which amount was deemed 
necessary to be secured before the college should be opened again. He, already an 
old man and worn with long service in Randolph-Macon College, Virginia, soon broke 
down, tho' not until, by a vigorous canvass, he had secured the desired amount of 
endowment. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



27 



In the College building an exceellent school was conducted, known as the "Classi- 
cal Seminary of Central College," until June 1870. The following September the 
college was formally re-opened under the Presidency of Rev. John C. Wills, D. D., 
of Alabama. In his faculty were Rev. F. X. Forster, Rev. Wesley G. Miller and 
Prof. 0. H. P. Corprew. All but the last have passed into the beyond, but he abides 
with us yet, in the emeritus relation, his courteous bearing in no way lessened, "The 
Noblest Roman of Them All." 

In 1878 President Wills died, leaving a memory whose fragrance yet remains, 
and in his stead was chosen Rev. Eugene R. Hendrix, D. D., whose early years had 
been spent in Central. He found the College in debt, the endowment nearly all gone, 
and large deficits existing in the salaries of the Professors. 

Taking hold with a vigorous hand he initiated an era of expansion and enlarge- 
ment. By June, 1886, when he resigned to accept the Bishopric to which he had been 
elected by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, all indebtedness had been cancelled, 
the endowment had grown to $110,000, the Campus increased to several acres; there had 




PROF. O. H. P. CORPREW 

been erected a small gymnasium, a temporary club house, and a magnificent chapel, and 
both curriculum and faculty had been enlarged. He had as co-workers such men as Cor- 
prew, Kilpatrick, E. A. Allen (now at Missouri State University), William B. Smith 
(now at Tulane University, New Orleans) , Armstrong, Frantz, Anderson and others. 
From 1886 to 1888 Prof. Corprew served as president pro tern, and during this time 
there came into the faculty R. T. Bond and T. Berry Smith. In June, 1888, Rev. 
John D. Hammond, D. D., became president, and served until June, 1896. During his 
administration the campus was increased to twenty acres and the splendid "Science 
Hall" was built. Showing in himself a grand specimen of physical manhood, com- 
bined with fine intellectual attainment and a religious character of the highest order, 
he sought to develop the whole man. He advocated physical training and had new 
equipments put in the gymnasium and he secured from Mrs. Catherine Johnson a 
tract of ground adjoining the Campus, which constitutes one of the best athletic 
fields in the state. His faculty consisted of Corprew, Kilpatrick, Frantz, Bond, 
Smith, Mumpower, White and others. 



28 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



In 1886 there was elected for the first time to the presidency an alumnus of the 
College. Tyson S. Dines, A. M., '80, of Denver, Colo., was chosen in June and did 
some service during the summer, but an accident just about the opening of the Fall 
term befell him and he was physically incapacitated throughout the remainder of the 
year. At its close he resigned. As his successor another alumnus was chosen. E. 
B. Craighead, A. M., '82, was called from the presidency of Clemson Agricultural 
College, South Carolina, and he entered at once on a vigorous policy which was 
prosecuted for four years with large success. It was during this time that the beau- 
tiful Cupples Hall was erected, one of the best college dormitories in the State. It 
was the gift of Mr. Samuel Cupples of St. Louis, whose generosity has been more 
than once felt by Central College. 

From June, 1901, to June, 1903, Prof. T. Berry Smith was acting president 
and the work of the college proceeded about as usual. Then the Rev. James C. 
Morris, D. D., of St. Louis, was chosen to the presidency. He brought to the office 
scholarly attainments and a matured manhood, softened by many years in the min- 
istry of the gospel. Under his administration the college took on new life, the faculty 
being increased in numbers, the attendance was enlarged fifty per cent, and a com- 
modious and well-equipped new gymnasium was erected at a cost of $14,000. It was 
during his term that the plan of celebrating the semi-centennial of the college had 
its inception. Of this Jubilee occasion see an account elsewhere. After three years 
he asked and was allowed leave of absence for one year, during which time Prof. 
William A. Webb was acting president. In April, 1907, Dr. Morris resigned and Prof. 
Webb become president. 

In the foregoing pages an outline of the history of Central College has been 
penned. In this, its jubilee year, we find the following summary of what has been 
done. It was in active operation four years preceding the Civil War, during which 
time it had six graduates. Then its doors were closed from 1861 to 1871. Since 
that time it has grown steadily along all lines and stands today among the foremost 
institutions of the West. It has had, in all, fourteen presidents and acting presi- 
dents, more than fifty professors and teachers, two hundred and ninety-four graduates 
and 3,000 different persons enrolled as students whose average attendance has been 
about two years. The Campus of one acre has grown to twenty-five acres, embrac- 
ing such variety of surface and growth as to render it probably the most charming 
Campus in the State. The original building that stood alone until 1884 has now 
the company of four other stately structures, as indicated in the accompanying cuts. 
In these buildings are found such equipments as serve the purposes of modern educa- 
tional work. A library of 10,000 volumes, an extensive and well arranged museum, 
laboratories, chemical, physical and biological, with/ their complements of apparatus, 
a splendid gymnasium for physical training, halls for the literary societies, and the 
usual quota of recitation and other rooms. The total value of this plant is estimated 
at $200,000. In the beginning the fathers figured on $25,000 for building and equip- 
ment, and $50,000 for endowment. This ratio of two to one has not been sustained, 
but it is hoped that the semi-centennial campaign will bring the nearly $200,000 of 
present endowment up to $400,000 or more. The intellectual and moral output of 
these fifty years cannot be estimated. 

The children of Alma Mater, whether titled or untitled, are filling many places 
of credit in the world and today Central's sons are standing shoulder to shoulder 
with the best of earth in the very forefront of educated Christian manhood. 

T. Berry Smith. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



29 




CENTENARY CHAPEL. 

This great brick edifice was erected in 1884 at a cost of $28,000. The auditorium 
has a seating capacity of 1,000, while and the ground floor is a lecture room for 
500. In this room are held all the ordinary services of the church and college, while 
the auditorium is used for the larger gatherings of both. There is a large pipe organ 
in the upper room. 



30 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




SCIENCE HALL. 

This is the Central building of the Campus. It was erected in 1894-5 and cost, 
with its furnishings, about $50,000. It is acknowledged by all who have seen it, to 
be among the finest and best arranged of college buildings anywhere. Within its 
walls is carried on all the work of the regular college classes. Here are class rooms, 
library, museum, laboratories and society halls. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE 



31 





wm: 




CUPPLES HALL. 

Cupples Hall was built in 1899 at a cost of $26,000. It was the gift of Mr. 
Samuel Cupples of St. Louis. The basement of uncut stone serves for the kitchen 
and dining hall with capacities for feeding one hundred and fifty persons. The other 
floors are surrounded by walls of mottled red brick and a red tile roof, the whole 
presenting a pleasing effect. On these floors are rooms, large and well ventilated, for 
fifty young men. There is a lavatory and bath room on each floor, and on the first 
floor are public parlors and the rooms of the housekeeper. This building is centrally 
located, and it makes an ideal college home. 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



By Rev. Willis Carlisle. 



I was appointed to this work June, 1905, without previous consultation or con- 
sent with no definite plans on my part nor suggestions on the part of the Board. 
The first work presenting itself was to form plans and organize for an effective two 
years' work. Keeping in mind the accomplishment of two ends, (1) Increase in 
number of students; (2) Increase in endowment. 

A careful examination of conditions, locally and throughout the state, as re- 
vealed through letters, personal visits to congregations, answers to direct questions, 
showed conclusively that the first work to be undertaken through this office was the 
work of greater publicity, to result in (1) Increased intelligence on the part of our 
people, (2) A quickening of conscience toward Central College, (3) An educational 



32 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



revival in Missouri Methodism. Plans calculated to accomplish these ends were care- 
fully formed and presented to the Board of Curators at their meeting in St. Louis 
November, 1905, with estimated cost of prosecuting such work, which plans after 
careful discussion, were adopted and funds voted to make them effective. 

THE PLAN IN BRIEF 

The Methodist pastor was found to be the key to the situation. He could aug- 
ment or destroy any latent interest. His co-operation is essential in his charge. He 
was to be cultivated in the most effectual way possible. This last statement has .been 
before us at all times. Gain the good will and co-operation of the 500 Methodist 
preachers in Missouri in behalf of Central College and the school will overflow with 
students, wills be written, the endowment increased. 

To encourage the pastors in their work and to assist them something must be 
done in arousing the public mind to a sense of the need and value of Central College 
to our church in Missouri. 

THIS WAS DONE: 

1. Through local work by the Secretary. I have made personal visit to leaders 
in our church, pastors or laymen, and in well planned conversations have gone over 
the entire situation, hearing what they had to say, meeting their objections, stilling 
their doubts and criticisms as much as possible, but at the end leaving this thought 
with them: " Whatever may or may have been done, whatever mistakes may or may 
not have been made, the fact remains that our beloved church must have Central 
College." 

2. Through addresses in individual churches. As opportunity has been 
given me by the pastors of our more influential churches I have, with one or two ex- 
ceptions, addressed the churches in the same strain. Some months ago I opened the 
way in several such churches for these addresses and accepted all calls. 

3. Through District Conference Addresses. 

Looking upon the district conferences as gatherings of our representative lay- 
men and pastors addresses have been planned for these both in 1906-07. 

This has been a valuable feature of the work in enlisting both laymen and 
pastors. 

4. Through conferences with officials. 

(a) With presiding elders. 

As effective work as has been done has been accomplished through this medium. 
These conferences have given us a state-wide view. They have also been the means 
of dirct committal. When these were held the time had come to know just 
where our leaders stood to know their ground, to commit themselves fairly and 
squarely, and this was the one aim of the conferences, other matters were of course 
considered. The chairman of our Board met the larger number of all the Presiding 
Elders in the state at the time of the St. Louis meeting in a helpful conference. 
The effects of such meetings, with a point, are obvious. 

(b) The same conferences have been held with the Conference Boards of Edu- 
cation in the Southwest Missouri and Missouri conferences. The first in Kansas 
City, the second in Moberly. The field carefully gone over in each instance, helpful 
suggestions made, and the work emphasized. 

5. Through Central College meetings at each of the Annual Conferences in 1906. 
Concerning the Semi-Centennial history: It is a matter of impossibility for me 

to write an adequate history, such as should grace the pages of the Semi-Centen- 
nial volume. To date, since the inauguration of the campaign by the appointment 
of the Semi-Centennial committee, composed of the members of the Board of Curat- 
ors, approximately $105,000 have been secured in notes, wills written, cash, build- 
ings and improvements; the college attendance has been increased 104 per cent since 
I came and all expecting a still larger increase for the coming year. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



33 




REV CARR WALLER PRITCHETT, LL. D., F. R. A. S. 



On the roaring billows of Time, thou are not ingulfed, but 
Borne aloft into the azure of Eternity. — Carlyle. 



Rev. Carr Waller Pritchett was born in Henry County, Virginia, September 
4th, 1823. In his thirteenth year with his parents, he came to Missouri, and settled 
in Warren county. He was the oldest of ten children and knew all the hardships 
of pioneer farm life. He had but scanty opportunities for getting an education, but 
being ambitious he studied much by the fireside and sometimes worked his algebra 
problems with keel on the plow beam while his horses were resting. In his twenty- 
first year he attended St. Charles College for eight months. In 1844, he began to 
teach, in which vocation he continued for most of the time for nearly thirty years, 
from 1851 to 1866 in Fayette, and from 1866 to 1873 in Glasgow. In Fayette he 
was associated, first with the Howard High School, and then with the organization 
of Central College from 1857 to 1861. In 1866 he became the first president of 
Pritchett College at Glasgow. In 1875 he became Director of the Morrison Astro- 
nomical Observatory at Glasgow, from which he retired in September, 1905, going 
to the country home of his son near Independence, Mo., where he is still living. 
Without the usual facilities of education in youth, yet he became a noted scholar 
and teacher in classical, mathematical and scientific subjects, and left an impress 
for good upon hundreds of young men and women in Central Missouri. In 1846, 
he became a licentiate in the Missouri Conference, and worked side by side with 
Enoch M. Marvin, then beginning his remarkable career in the same county; was 
ordained Deacon in 1857, and located in 1870— credited with sixteen years ^ in the 
active work. He was a very able preacher, but gave his life rather to the instruc- 
tion of youth, and the study of the wonders of the heavens. His degrees honorary 
are, A. M. (St. Charles), LL. D. (Central), and F. R. A. S. of England. He was 
married in the fall of 1849 to Miss Betty Susan Smith of Pike County, Missouri, 
who died in Glasgow, in November, 1872. To them were born seven children, two of 
whom died in infancy. The surviving are two daughters, Lizzie and Sadie Byrd, and 
three sons, Dr. Henry S. Pritchett of New York, Oswald S. Pritchett, of Independ- 
ence, Mo., and Carr W. Pritchett of Denver, Colo. 



34 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV WILLIS CARLISLE. 



The end of thought is Action. — From the Greek. 



By Rev. Ward M. Baker. 
Rev. Willis Carlisle, of Kentucky parentage, was born August 20th, 1869. His 
father was a Baptist preacher. He was educated in the Omaha, Illinois, Male Acad- 
emy, and Owensville, Indiana, High school; also the Indiana Normal University, 
graduating therefrom in the class of 1889. He taught two years in the public 
schools of Indiana, one year in Illinois, and was for three years principal of a 
Missouri public school. He was admitted on trial by the St. Louis Annual Confer- 
ence in 1893, Bishop Duncan presiding. He was appointed to the Jackson, Missouri, 
Methodist College, as president, and after five years of successful school work, he 
was, at his own request, allowed to give all his time to pastoral labor. He trans- 
ferred to the Missouri Conference in 1899, and was appointed to Rocheport Circuit. 
The following three years as Presiding Elder of the St. Charles District, he proved 
his zeal, energy, enterprise and power of initiative, by not only paying the Con- 
ference collections in full by direct effort in the respective charges, but bringing the 
salary of every preacher in the district up in full, and the last year enterprising 
the first District parsonage of the Missouri Conference. In June, 1905, at the 
earnest call of the Board of Trustees of Central College, he accepted the office of 
Secretary of the College. He began at once to spread abroad a wider and more 
thorough knowledge of this institution. His work has had special reference to the 
organization of the State for the Semi-Centennial movement. The celebration of 
the Semi-Centennial is to take place in October, 1907. Already the whole state has 
been organized for a series of meetings in which every member of our church in 
Missouri will be asked to contribute to the endowment of Central College. With 
remarkable zeal, a genius for office work, untiring energy, ability on the platform 
and in private, the work is being pressed by the Secretary. He was married to Miss 
Carrie, daughter of Rev. Godfrey Phillips, a member of the New York East Con- 
ference, July 29th, 1891. They have a son and daughter before the Father's throne. 
Miriam Carlisle and Magdalen Carlisle are in this earthly home. Of fine physique, 
cultured in manner, strong in mind, and living in the daily presence of the Eternal, 
in the very prime of life, God hath a greater future for this man of worth. 



CENTRAL COLLEGE 



35 




PROF. RICHARD THOMPSON BOND, A. M. 



If inextinguishable thirst in Man to know, how rich, how full, 
Our banquet there! — Young. 



Richard Thompson Bond. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy in Central Collegee, Fayette, Mo., was 
born in Chambersburg, Pa., September 25th, 1838. His father, Rev. Richard Bond, 
M. D., was born in Baltimore County, Maryland, and his mother, Eliza Ann Thomp- 
son, in Westmoreland County, Virginia. His parents moved to Missouri in 1841, and 
settled in Danville, Montgomery County, where R. T. Bond attended a private school 
taught by Rev. Carr W. Pritchett, and in 1855 he attended Howard High School at 
Fayette, Mo., taught by Rev. Carr W. Pritchett and W. T. Lucky. During the next 
twelve years he was occupied in farming, mining, merchandising, freighting and 
traveling. He made three trips from New York to San Francisco by water, two 
by way of Panama, one by way of Nicaragua. Also trips overland to Denver, Santa 
Fe, Boise City, California and Oregon, before there was any Pacific railroad. 

In February, 1867, he returned to Missouri and married Miss Hannah Mcllhany 
in Callaway County, and in the fall of that year went to Glasgow, Mo., to teach 
in Pritchett School Institute, where he remained either as teacher or president until 
1886, save four years spent in St. Louis teaching mathematics in Washington Uni- 
versity. In the fall of 1886 he was called to the Chair of Mathematics and Astron- 
omy in Central College, Fayette, Mo., which position he holds at present, January 
1st, 1907. 

He was converted in Macon City, Mo., in 1867, under the preaching of Rev. 
William A. Smith, D. D., during the session of the Missouri Annual Conference. He 
joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in Glasgow, Mo., immediately after 
the close of the Conference, Rev. William Penn being the preacher in charge. He 
was licensed to preach by the Glasgow Quarterly Conference in the summer of 1885, 
and was immediately appointed by Rev. John A. Mumpower, the Presiding Elder, to 
supply the Salisbury Circuit for the remainder of the Conference year. He was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop John C. Granbery at Palmyra in 1889, and was ordained 
elder at Monroe City, by Bishop Atticus G. Haygood in 1893. 



36 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




PROF. T. BERRY SMITH, A. M. 



Floriferis ut apes in saltibus omnia libant. — Lucretius. 

As from the sweetest flowers the lab'ring bee extracts her 

Precious sweets. — Creech. 



Prof. T. Berry Smith was born December 7th, 1850, near Cyrene, Pike County, 
Missouri. His father, William Hugh Smith, belonged to the Baptist Church, and his 
mother, Isabelle McCune Fullerton Smith, was a member of the Cumberland Pres- 
byterian Church. He grew up on the farm and was educated in the old log school 
house in his childhood. He was converted in January, 1870, at Glasgow, Mo., under 
the ministry of Rev. Thomas J. Gooch, and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, at that time. He was a student in Pritchett College, and made his home with 
the Rev. Carr W. Pritchett, whose wife was his father's sister; he decided to 
act, did so, and was gloriously satisfied in his own room after retiring, and has never 
had the slightest doubt since. He has always enjoyed religion and has been an 
active worker in church and Sunday School. He enjoys a full and abiding peace 
and loves the communion of the people of God. He attended and graduated trom 
Pritchett College, at Glasgow, Mo., with A. B. in 1873, and A. M. in 1879; tooK 
graduate work in chemistry at Yale College in 1875 and 1876, and has been teaC ™ ng 
ever since. He was married to Miss Emma Marvin Newland, December 27th, lo<<> 
and has three children, Beryl Dean Smith, Walton Caples Smith and Shirley Steele 
Smith. He considers his call to the Chair of Chemistry and Physics in Central 
College in June, 1886, in which position he has served twenty-one years, as the most 
important event in his life. During 1901 and 1903 ho was also acting president oi 
Central College. In 1900 he issued a volume of poems of 100 pages, entitled in 
Many Moods." He is also the author of a "History of Central College,' a P re P^a 
for a government volume on Higher Education in Missouri, in 1898, and has written 
a semi-centennial song, words and music, for Central College, which is just out. 




MI SSOl' K I Cos FKKKNCK 



CENTRAL COLLEGE. 



37 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE 1 895, 
MACON, MO. 



1. 


J. H. French 


54. 


2. 


G. E. Tanquary 


55. 


3. 


C. N. Broadhurst 


56. 


4. 


Thos. H. Swearingen 


57. 


5. 


G. M. Gibson 


58. 


6. 


T. G. Petree 


59. 


7. 


Fielding- Marvin 


60. 


8. 


W. F. Packard 


61. 


9. 


J. A. Snow 


62. 


10. 


Unidentified 


63. 


11. 


B. W. Fielder 


64. 


12. 


A. V. Bayley 


65. 


13. 


L. F. Parker 


66. 


14. 


J. G. Diggs 


67. 


15. 


R. "Wilkinson 


68. 


16. 


L. B. Madison 


69. 


17. 


G. B. Hitch 


70. 


18. 


T. P. Middleton 


71. 


19. 


J. H. Bishop 


72. 


20. 


Unidentified 


73. 


21. 


J. A. Mumpower 


74. 


22. 


J. A. Wailes 


75. 


23. 


W E. Dockerg 


76. 


24. 


W. F. Ready 


77. 


25. 


J. F. Wyatt 


78. 


26. 


J. W. Garvin 


79. 


27. 


T. A. Allison 


80. 


28. 


The same 


81. 


29. 


J. A. Merchant 


82. 


30. 


J. O. Whitworth 


83. 


31. 


J. P. Godbey 


84. 


32. 


Dr. S. Kennerly 


85. 


33. 


Unidentified 


86. 


34. 


C. A. Lewis 


87. 


35. 


L. N. Wagner 


88. 


36. 


A. M. Bedford 


89. 


37. 


Unidentified 


90. 


38. 


G. W. Nollner 


91. 


39. 


Wm. F. Bell 


92. 


40. 


H. C. Bolen 


93. 


41. 


W. H. Roper 


94. 


42. 


W. S. Woodward 


95. 


43. 


Unidentified 


96. 


44. 


Ward M. Baker 


97. 


45. 


S, O. Maughas 


98. 


46. 


Unidentified 


99. 


47. 


H. C. Morrison 


100. 




Missionary Secretary 


101. 


48. 


J. D. Hunt 


102. 


49. 


J. Y. Blakey 


103. 


50. 


C. K. Shilling 


104. 


51. 


Marion Moore 


105. 


52. 


J. E. Keller 


106. 


53. 


W. F. McMurry 


107. 



W S. Rooker 

W W McMurry 

Mrs. M. E. Lawson 

J. B. Shover 

W. C. Maggart 

E. E. Bostwick 

L. P. Siceloff 

G. B. Harris 

I. T. Nash 

Geo. W. Penn 

C. W Collett 

A. S. Bowles 

Martin E. Lawson 

J. E. Fisher 

J. T. Kinsey 

M. L. Allishouse 

S. H. Milam 

L. C. Maggart 

L. T. Fawks 

Unidentified 

J. O. Edmonston 

E. F. Perkins, M. 

W. O. Medley 

Unidentified 

M. F. Brower 

A. C. Browning 

J. W Tanquary 

C. G. Hill 
Unidentified 
Unidentified 
M. L. Gray 
H. C. Garrett 
E. L. Rutledge 
R. W. Howerton 
Unidentified 
John Anderson 
W B. Llewellyn 
W. B. Wheeler 
W. J. Parrin 

J. T. McDonald 
Unidentified 
J. M. Settle 
T. M. Patterson 
Unidentified 
Unidentified 
J. L. Taylor 
Dr. B. Winn 
R. M. Neale 
Unidentified 
J. H. Hubbfrd 
E. M. Capp 

D. C. O'Howell 
John Robson 

Z. M. Williams 



D. 



108. 


J. R. A. Vaughan 


109. 


Unidentified 


110. 


H. A. Smith 


111. 


S. H. Renfro 


112. 


D. R. Shackleford 


113. 


Unidentified 


114. 


Unidentified 


115. 


Unidentified 


116. 


J. H. Hagar 


117. 


Dr. Jno. D. Hammond 


118. 


R. J. Bigham 

Cor. Sec'y of Education 


119. 


Unidentified 


120. 


John Holland 


121. 


Mrs. Homer Tuggle 


122. 


P P. Ellis 


123. 
124. 


T. B. Farry 
E. D. Swartz 


125. 


Homer Tuggle 


126. 


Miss Minnie Buckley 


127. 
128. 


C. W Herley 
Unidentified 


129. 


Unidentified 


130. 


J. B. Rice 


131. 


W. C. Rice 


132. 


S. W. Cope 


133. 


Robert White 


134. 


R. M. Dameron 


135. 


Mrs. R. M. Dameron 


136. 


Bishop W W. Duncan 
Presiding Bishop 


137. 
138. 


J. M. Dempsey 
Unidentified 


139. 


J. A. Mitchell 


140. 


J. B. Parnell 


141. 


J. C. Kindred 


142. 


D. F. Bone 


143. 


Unidentified 


144. 


Dr. Jno. D. Vincil 
Sec'y of Conference 


145. 


J. M. Proctor 


146. 


Unidentified 


147. 


A. B. Sanderson 


148. 


C. T. McAnally 


149. 


Dr. Daniel Morton 
Church Extension Sec'j 


150. 


J. L. Meffert 


151. 
152. 


H. M. Myers 

C. I. Vanderventer 


153. 


J. J. Watts 


154. 
155. 


Frank Siler 

Mrs. C. T. McAnally 


156. 


Jno. F. Shores 


157. 


R. H. Cooper 



38 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME O F MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE. 




REV JOHN D. VINCEL, D. D. 
One of the Greatest Conference Secretaries. 



1 806-CENTENNIAL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 

ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



Presiding Elder 
St. Charles Station. 
Troy Station. 
Troy Circuit. 
Clarksville Circuit. 
Elsberry Circuit. 
Defiance Circuit. 
O'Fallon Circuit. 
Wright City Circuit. 
Warrenton Circuit. 
Jonesburg. 



.C. 0. Ransford 

W- B. Wheeler 

,J. A. Mumpower 

.C. L. Hess 

.J. M. Boon 

.C. W. Gow 

W. B. Rigg 

.J. H. Sneed 

.J. L. Roberts 

.S. H. Milam 

.G. E. Eaves 



Belleflower Circuit. 
New Florence Circuit. 
Laddonia Circuit. 
Frankfort and Bowling 

Vandalia Circuit. 
Winfield Circuit. 
Silex Circuit. 
Center Circuit. 
Louisiana Station. 



.J. W Slade 
.J. W. Ham 

W C. Russell 
Green . 

To be supplied 

•E. W. Reynolds 

W. E. Akers 

• D - R. McBee 

v J- Millis 

• E - D - Watson 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



39 




REV. CHARLES ORRIN RANSFORD. 



After Calvary has been seen in the midst of the eternities it can 
Nevermore be doubted that God is love — Bishop Marvin. 



Son of Charles Orrin Ransford and Elizabeth Abbott Ransford, was born in St. 
Joseph, Mo., April 6, 1868. His mother was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He was converted and joined the Church November 20, 1887, under 
the ministry of the late Rev. Julien C. Brown, D. D., then pastor of Francis street. 
He was licensed to preach, June 10, 1889, by the Francis Street Quarterly Conference 
at St. Joseph; Rev. A. G. Dinwiddie, D. D., P. C, and Rev. R. H. Cooper, P. E. After 
he was licensed to preach and at intervals during his college vacations he assisted the 
pastors of our churches and in mission work in St. Joseph. He was recommended 
by the Hundley (St. Joseph) Quarterly Conference in August, 1893, Rev. J. M. 
O'Bryen, P, E., for admission to the Missouri Conference, and was received during 
September, 1893, Bishop A. G. Haygood presiding. He was ordained Local Deacon 
by Bishop A. G. Haygood at Monroe City September 17, 1893, and traveling Elder 
September 4, 1898, by Bishop W. A. Candler at Memphis, Mo. He received his edu- 
cation in the Public schools of St. Joseph, Central College and Vanderbilt University. 
He married Miss Maude Francis Blackburn November 25, 1897, and the names of 
their children are Charles Orrin, Jr., Willie Elizabeth (deceased), and William 
Blackburn. He was for four years Assistant Secretary of the Conference under the 
late Dr. John D. Vincil, and has been chosen secretary in his place since his death. 
His appointments have been as follows: Memphis Circuit, 1893; Memphis Station, 
1894; student Vanderbilt University and supply at Dublin and Brooklyn, Northern 
Mississippi Conference, 1895; Hunewell, 1896-97; New London and Hydesburg, 
1898-99; Centralia Circuit, 1900; Centralia Station, 1901; Brookfield, 1902; New 
Franklin, 1903-04; Norborne Station, 1905; Presiding Elder St. Charles Dis- 
trict, 1906. 

He has helped to pay off some of the church debts of the Missouri Conference, and 
has never hesitated to take hold of even the hardest field. His work as Secretary 
of the Missouri Conference has been eminently satisfactory, and all recognize him as 
a worthy successor of the Rev. John D. Vincil, D. D. His preaching and business 
training will make him notably efficient in his work as Presiding Elder. 



40 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




WSmm 



REV JOHN ABRAHAM MUM POWER. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 41 



REV JOHN ABRAHAM MUMPOWER. 



All that is purest in purpose and holiest in life and tenderest 
In sympathy and sweetest in mercy and freest in charity and 
Fairest in virtue and most beautiful in character are the direct 
Inspiration of the Christian Religion. — Bishop Galloway. 



Rev. John Abraham Mumpower was born near Haynesville (now Holt), Clay 
County, Mo., January 8, 1842. His father, David Mumpower, was baptized in the 
Lutheran Church, and his mother, Amanda M. F. Gray Mumpower, baptized and 
reared in the Presbyterian Church. Both became ardent, loyal Methodists in his 
early boyhood. The son was converted and joined the church under the ministry 
of Rev. Wesley G. Miller, D. D., at Chillicothe, Mo., February, 1857. He attended 
the High School at Chillicothe under Rev. W T. Ellington, and was licensed to exhort 
by the Chillicothe Quarterly Conference, April 19, 1862; Rev. W T. Ellington,; P. C, 
pro tern., acting president. By the same Quarterly Conference and under the same 
president pro tern, he was licensed to preach, August 9, 1862. He was recommended 
to the Missouri Conference for admission on trial by the Spring Hill Quarterly Con- 
ference, Chillicothe District, of 1864; Rev. William Kettron, P. E., and admitted in 
September 1864, at the Conference at Mexico; Rev. Andrew Monroe presiding, (in 
the absence of the Bishop) . He was ordained Deacon at Macon City, September 8, 
1867, by Bishop E. M. Marvin, and ordained Elder at Chillicothe, September 19, 1869, 
by Bishop George F. Pierce. He was married to Miss Lucy West Carr, April 27, 
1871, and two children were born to them, Alpha Givens, who died in infancy, and 
Beta Eloise, now Mrs. Jno. M. Sosey, of Palmyra, Mo. His appointments have been 
as follows: 

Maysville, 1864; Albany, 1865; Yellow Creek (Bucklin), 1866; Savannah, 1867- 
1869; Weston, 1870; Presiding Elder Gallatin District, 1871, 1872; Carrollton, 1873; 
Gallatin, 1874, 1877; Presiding Elder from February to September to fill vacancy of 
Rev. W M. Wood, deceased; Macon, 1878, 1881; Presiding Elder Fayette District, 
1882, 1885; Presiding Elder Mexico District, 1886, 1889; Mexico, 1890, 1891; Palmyra, 
1892, 1893; Gallatin, 1894, 1895; Plattsburg, 1896, 1897; Presiding Elder Macon Dis- 
trict, 1898, 1900; Presiding Elder St. Joseph District, 1901, 1904; Presiding Elder 
St. Charles District, 1905; Troy, 1906. 

He has no complete record of the number of people he has received into the 
Church, but it may be truly said that in the early years he was a good revivalist and 
held meetings of great power. He has been helping to pay church debts all his 
life and built the parsonage at Macon City. As Presiding Elder it has fallen to his 
lot to superintend the erection of a great many churches and parsonages. He 
grounded himself early in life by reading the greatest Methodist authors and later 
read with great interest and profit Bledsoe's Theodicy. The greatest crisis in his 
Mfe came when he committed all his fortunes to the work of an itinerant Methodist 
preacher. It may truly be said of Brother Mumpower that his brotherly spirit and 
wise counsel have been a great blessing to Missouri Methodism. 



42 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



SfSSV? .:SV.,5 V v::,:.ra.LV::: ; l 





»S 



1 



s^ySxvl 



Ml 








HH 



»»l»IfH!Mllillllm l 



REV WILLIAM B. WHEELER. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 43 



REV WILLIAM B. WHEELER. 



Life is probation, and the earth no goal 
But starting point of Man; compel him strive, 
Which means, in Man, as good as reach the goal. 

— Robert Broivning. 



By Rev. T. H. B. Anderson, D. D. 

Our Brother is of massive frame; might be called a man for emergencies. He 
is militant, ecclesiastically and nationally; is absolutely fearless. He could lead an 
army in the face of grape and cannister. "San Juan Hill" or "Little Round Top," 
would set his nerves in tune and be music. Nevertheless, he is gentle in home-life; 
the kindest of husbands, the most indulgent of fathers; the truest of friends. Nor 
is he a man who must have his own way. He will hear others, and take advice, 
provided he has confidence in the giver. He has filled important charges as the reader 
will see. The erection of that beautiful church edifice at Carrollton, was his work, 
being the pastor. In school he studied Latin, German and Spanish. He has a well- 
selected library, and reads to good advantage. He is fond of historic incidents; 
indeed, his strength in the pulpit consists in utilizing stirring scenes found in civil 
and ecclesiastical history. His plan of discourse is his own. Sentences short and 
epigrammatic, have the rattle of musketry along the line of battle. He hits hard; 
often the enemy is wounded. He is strong mentally; orthodox in faith, and tremend- 
ously in earnest. He has given much thought and time to the material interests of 
the Church. He is a good man to engineer a difficult business problem. The first 
twenty-five years of ministerial life, the preacher should have the sun by day and 
the lamp by night as headlights. He should do nothing but tunnel through granite 
— laying a good foundation against the time to come — old age. Our subject, Rev. 
W. B. Wheeler, has not only a massive physique, but mind; and there is no subject 
he could not master. At Macon City, he succeeded Rev. H. C. Garrett, who built 
the new Church and provided by subscription for most of the money. The burden 
— the last payments — came upon Brother Wheeler. In this he had the cheerful co- 
operation of the Church. He left there, as at Carrollton and Gallatin, a great 
company of friends. Additional to his ministry, he was connected with schools more 
or less for fourteen years. In Missouri, from 1877 to 1880; in Illinois, from 1881 to 
1882; in New Mexico, from 1883 to 1886. He was President of the Las Vegas Female 
College, Colorado; also connected with the public schools of that state, 1887-8. Was 
Superintendent of Schools of Logan County, 1889; and while principal of Logan 
High School was a member of the committee that formed the Curriculum of the State 
Schools. He was one of the seven who re-wrote a large part of the school laws of 
Colorado. He was educated in Shelbyville High School, and in Shelbina College; 
Prof. Ripley, President. 

His wife, Mrs. Wheeler, is a most admirable character, and a helpmate, indeed. 
The little family around them are attractive, cultured and figure in the social life 
of the Church. 



U CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JOSEPH ALLEN. 



In vital communion with God we are transformed, and become, 
Not by formal adoption only, but by actual regeneration and 
Participation of nature, His children. — Bishop Marvin. 



By Miss Mary Louise Dalton. 

One of the heroes of early Methodism in Missouri was the Reverend Joseph Allen, 
who was a man of great talent and devoted to his work of evangelizing the West. 
He was born in Henry County, Virginia, came to Missouri about the year 1827, and 
died in St. Charles County, Missouri, in 1835. His father, William Allen, was mar- 
ried twice. By his second wife, Ann Smith, he had five children, Susan, Robert, 
Joseph, Pines and Frances. 

Rev. Joseph Allen was married twice. By his first marriage he had a son named 
William. He married, second, Rachel May, daughter of Captain John May, a soldier 
of the Revolution, born in Buckingham County, Virginia, and of Elizabeth Hunter, 
his wife, born in Campbell County, Virginia, daughter of James Hunter, Sr. John 
May died March 20, 1884, in his eighty-eighth year, and his wife died July 17, 1848, 
in her eighty-seventh year. 

The children of Joseph and Rachel (May) Allen were William M., Robert L., 
Elizabeth M., John P., Joseph J., Susan A., and Rachel. 

Of the career in North Carolina of Joseph Allen this mention was made in a 
letter written in 1894 by Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton, a native of North Carolina, 
then in his eighty-eighth year, whose mother was a cousin of Rachel May Allen: 
"Joseph Allen was distinguished in North Carolina as an eloquent preacher and leg- 
islator, and was the grand uncle of John, the M. C, whose father was my youthful 
playmate." 

The Rev. Carr Waller Pritchett, who never saw Joseph Allen, but who knew his 
family well, gives the following account of him and his family: 

"In the fall of 1835," writes Mr. Pritchett, "my father emigrated from Henry 
County Virginia, and settled in St. Charles County, Missouri, on what was known 
as the 'Allen place.' Rev. Joseph Allen had died there the preceding summer or 
autumn. His widow, Rachel Allen, a sister of Captain Charles P. May, was living 
on the place with her two young daughters, Susan and Rachel, and her sons, Robert, 
John and Joseph. The two young girls both died in early womanhood, and John and 
Joseph died young, though John was first married to his cousin, Martha Allen, a 
daughter of Pines Allen, a brother of Rev. Joseph Allen. The son, Robert, became 
a man of influence and distinction in Warren County, where he became a judge of 
the court, married Miss Ann Pendleton, near Camp Branch, was a very influential 
member of the Methodist Church for many years before his death. An older brother, 
William M. Allen, lived and died near Wentzville. Rev. Joseph S. Allen, of the Missouri 
Conference, was a son of Robert Allen. He died some years ago, and is fondly 
remembered. 

"The elder Joseph Allen, who died in 1835, was a roving Methodist itinerant, 
who chose his own field and traveled over Missouri and Illinois, holding meetings and 
preaching the Gospel. Fifty or more years after his death I have heard men refer 
to the time and place of his meetings. I have heard that he was an humble, con- 
secrated, self-denying man, and was the honored instrument in the conversion of many 
people in North Carolina, Missouri, and Illinois. He lies buried about 150 yards west 
of the old dwelling house, and when I last saw it, the grave was unmarked. His 
widow, Rachel Allen, survived him many years." 

William M. Allen, the oldest son of the Rev. Joseph Allen, married Mary M. 
Shelton, his cousin. They lie buried in the cemetery at Wentzville. Their children 
were: Elizabeth F., now deceased, married George S. Myers; Rachel A., married 
Thomas C. Boyd; Joseph J., died in childhood; Tabitha S., married Rev. Joseph S. Allen; 
Mary M., now deceased, married Warren W. Walker; William S., died in infancy; 
William H., married Emma E. Simms; Nannie F., married Thomas Riddle. 

In 1846, during the administration of Governor John C. Edwards, William M. 
Allen represented St. Charles County in the state legislature. He was senator from 
his district, then the first, in 1850, under Governor Austin A. King. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



45 



REV JOSEPH S. ALLEN. 



Family tradition produces wonderful results upon Personal 
Character. — Bishop Marvin. 







By Rev. H. A. Bourland,D.D. 

Rev. Joseph S. Allen, son of 
Robert L. Allen and Ann Allen, 
was born in Warren County, 
Missouri, April 17th, 1841. In 
his childhood he was happily 
converted and united with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. Soon after his conver- 
sion a definite call to the minis- 
try came to him. A deep sense 
of the responsibility involved in 
such a vocation, caused hesita- 
tion and he began to prepare for 
the study of medicine. After ac- 
quiring such education as the 
common schools furnished, he / 
matriculated in St. Charles Col- 
lege then under the presidency 
of Rev. W H. Anderson, D. D., 
in the autumn of 1895. At this 
juncture my acquaintance with 
young Allen began. We were 
room-mates in the home of Rev. 
John W. Robinson. I knew his 
inmost heart and the struggles 
through which he was passing. 
The civil war coming on, his 
college course was abruptly ter- 
minated and he returned to his 
home at Wentzville, Missouri. 
On the 15th day of June, 1862, 
he was united in marriage with 
Miss Tabitha Allen. Three girls 
came to bless their happy union 
— two of them died in infancy, 
one Annie, at the age of twenty- 
one, passed into the great 
brightness. Brother Allen final- 
ly yielded to his conviction to preach and was licensed in 1864, and was at the en- 
suing Missouri Conference assigned work. His appointments were, Wright City, 
O'Fallon, Jonesburg, Fulton and Auxvasse Circuits, Louisiana Station and was then 
made Presiding Elder of St. Charles District, which he filled acceptably four years. 
Then he was assigned to the Troy Circuit three years. In the midst of the third 
year he was stricken with a fatal malady and died in a hospital in St. Louis, whither 
he had gone for an operation, January 22nd, 1895. Joseph S. Allen was a manly 
man, a sincere Christian, an Israelite indeed in whom was no guile. Gentle as a 
woman, he was loved by all who knew him. Brave in the discharge of duty, he could 
be trusted with responsible positions. Untiring in service, he labored beyond his 
strength. As a preacher he was sensible, strong and pathetic. Without any attempt 
at oratory or eloquence, by the manifestation of the truth, he commended himself 
to very man's conscience in the sight of God. Under his ministry sinners were con- 
victed and converted and believers were edified. His influence was potent for good 
in all circles, whether on the street among men of the world, in the home, or in the> 
church. Always and everywhere he bore himself with dignity and honor. He bore 
in. his bosom the white flower of a spotless life, and many in the last # day shall rise 
up and call him blessed. His companion survives him and cherishes his memory and 
awaits the reunion with husband and children in the home of the blessed. 




Mm! 



46 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MR. WARREN WALKER. 



In Faith the Soul actually affiances itself to Christ. — Bishop Marvin. 

By Miss Mary Louise Dalton. 

Warren Walker, son of Joel 
and Sarah (Gauss) Walker, 
was born in North Carolina, 
January 15, 1799, and died in 
St. Charles County, Mo., Febru- 
ary 17, 1863. He was married 
to Miss Mary Baker May in 
Rockingham County, North Car- 
olina, May 15, 1828, by the Rev. 
Edwards. The young couple re- 
moved to Cheatham County, 
Tenn., where their first child 
was buried. In the summer of 
1830 they came to Missouri and 
settled on a farm near the pres- 
ent town of Wentzville, St. 
Charles County. 

Mary Baker (May) Walker, 
born April 3, 1807, died Decem- 
ber 3, 1893, was the eldest child 
of Charles Powhatan May, a sol- 
dier of the War of 1812, and 
Ursula Allen Johnson, his wife. 
Charles P. May was a son of 
John May, a soldier of the Rev- 
olution, and Elizabeth Hunter, 
his wife, a daughter of James 
Hunter, Sr. The children of 
Warren and Mary Walker were : 
Robert Allen, died in infancy; 
Mary De Graffenreid, married 
first, Ferdinand Stone White- 
head, second, Horace T. F. Linn, 
died in 1887; Sarah Allen, died 
youth; Benjamin Franklin, 




in 



married Frances Allen, died in 
1869 ; Warren Washington, mar- 
ried, first, Mary M. Allen, sec- 
ond, Mary (Goodfellow) Forster; Elizabeth A., died in childhood; Harriet Ursula, mar- 
ried William R. Dalton; Charles Joseph, married Hattie F. Shore. 

Warren and Mary Walker united with the Methodist Church in their youth in North 
Carolina. In Missouri, they held their membership first in "Old Bethlehem" church, 
then a log school house, and later in the Flint Hill Church, now abandoned. Their 
home, "Cedar Grove," was always open to the Methodist preacher, and a generous hos- 
pitality to all was practiced there. Bishop Marvin was invited to dine at Cedar Grove 
on that Sunday in the summer of 1841 after he had preached his first sermon. Among 
those who visited in that home, the special friends of Mr. Walker, were Bishop Mar- 
vin, Rev. Andrew Monroe, Dr. B. F. Johnson, Rev. W. A. Mayhew, Rev. George Penn, 
Rev. Wm. W. Redman, Rev. Bond, Rev. S. W. Cope, Rev. D. T. Sherman, Rev. R. G. 
Loving, Rev. W. M. Newland, Mr. David K. Pitman, Captain Campbell and Mr. Lloyd 
Dorsey. 

For many years Warren Walker was class leader in his church. He was a man 
truly upright, proficient in good works, and a devoted Christian. The heritage of his 
good name is one of the most precious possessions of his descendants. His impartiality 
of opinion and sound judgment won for him the confidence of his neighbors. In Mis- 
souri in those early days questions in dispute were frequently submitted by the parties 
in controversy to arbitration by a third person. Warren Walker was often the adjudi- 
cator of his community. He was public spirited. Before 1840 he had provided for a 
school for his own and his neighbors' children, and had given to the school district an 
acre of land which was named "Rockingham School" in honor of his home county in 
North Carolina, which name it bears today. The last year of his life was spent in 
invalidism, patiently borne. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 47 



REV JESSE ANDREW WAILES. 



The giving of Christ's life was for the recovery and enrichment 
Of our Life. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. Jesse Andrew Wailes was born February 18th, 1863, in Shelby County, Mis- 
souri. He is a son of John W Wailes and Mary P. Wailes, both of whom were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, the greater part of their lives. 
He was converted in 1872, under the ministry of Rev. L. Rush, and joined the Church 
the same night of his conversion. It had always been his desire to be a Christian, 
but when he went to the altar and joined the Church he felt that he had received 
additional strength, but his conversion was not sudden. He grew in grace until he was 
fifteen years old, when he distinctly felt the call to preach the Gospel, but not wishing 
to preach, he began to make excuses, and finally told God that he would not preach, 
and from that time lost his religion. He kept up the form of religion, but was devoid 
of the power for five years, when, through providence directing Rev. J. A. Snarr 
and Rev. W- W McMurry, he was aroused, and after a desperate struggle with self 
and the devil, he surrendered, and God again blessed him and he entered His service. 
He was licensed to preach by the Quarterly Conference of the Shelbyville Circuit, 
February 9th, 1884; the same Quarterly Conference recommended him to the Annual 
Conference July 19th, 1884, and he was received into the Annual Conference in Sep- 
tember of that same year; Dr. Wm. M. Rush, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Parker, 
presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop McTyeire at S.t, Joseph, Missouri, Sep- 
tember 12th, 1886; ordained Elder by Bishop Hendrix, at Gallatin, Missouri, Septem- 
ber 9th, 1888. He served the following appointments: Warrenton and Wright City 
Circuit,' 1884-1885; Monticello Circuit, 1885-1889; Clarence Circuit, 1889-1890; St. 
Charles District, four years. Quite a number were converted and received into the 
Church under his ministry. He obtained his education in the public schools of his 
county. He was married to Miss Hattie J. McRoberts, August 25th, 1885, and two 
children were born to them, Jessie Lee Wailes and Lulu May Wailes. He considers 
the most important crisis in his life was when all alone in the woods he decided the 
question whether he would do his duty and preach, or fail to do his duty and go down 
to hell. The struggle lasted several hours, and he was exhausted in the contest. 
He frnaly surrendered to God, and he says the greatest crisis in his life was passed 
then and he was God's from that time forward. 

Brother Wailes also filled Monroe City Station and Shelbina Station. Since that 
time he has been in California. There his first wife died, and he is now married the 
second time. Brother Wailes is a strong, popular preacher, and he holds an audience 
to good attention. 



48 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV GEORGE WALTER BRUCE, A. M. 



Sermonem vitae praetendentes. 
Holding forth the Word of Life. 



-St. Paid. 



George Walter Bruce, son of Dr. Lucien N. Bruce and his wife, Dorinda Rutherford, 
was born in Fayette County, Tenn., October 29, 1860. At the age of seven he moved 
with his parents to Bruceville, Texas, which was his home for 28 years. Here he had 
the good fortune to grow up on a farm, to do any kind of farm work; and is proud of 
the fact that he spent the year 1873 in driving four yoke of oxen, helping thereby to 
put in cultivation 200 acres of prairie land. In his early life he attended the country 
schools; later the Agricultural and Mechanical College near Bryant, Texas, under mil- 
itary discipline; finally graduating at Southwestern University at Georgetown, Texas, 
in 1882, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and in 1883, Master of Arts. During his 
last year at the University he was tutor in Latin. He was converted in his room 
March 25, 1881, whereupon he commenced an active Christian life. He spent seven 
years as Vice-President and Professor in Centenary College at Lampasas, Texas. It was 
here that he felt called to preach and was admitted into the Northwest Texas Confer- 
ence on trial, at Lampasas, Texas, Bishop Keener, Presiding. He was appointed to his 
work in the College for four years succeeding. Then for five years was in the pastorate, 
serving Circuits and Stations. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Hendrix and Elder 
by Bishop Key. In February, 1895, he was married to Ida, oldest daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. H. Brady, of Nevada, Missouri, and is the father of six children. 

He was elected President of St. Charles College at St. Charles, Missouri, August 
16, 1901, re-opening this once famous institution the 14th day of September, 1901, with 
six scholars. His knowledge of the benefits of the Military training prompted him to 
recommend to the Board of Curators of the College that it be made a Military School, 
which was done the second year of his administration and it has steadily grown in 
attendance until the two College buildings are now fully crowded and more buildings 
and equipments are demanded. The General Assembly of the State passed an act mak- 
ing St. Charles Military College a Post of the National Guard of Missouri and requir- 
ing the Governor to commission the President as Colonel. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



49 




«,* 



MR. JOHN STONE AND FAMILY. 

One of the Oak Grove families living now near Elsberry, Missouri. Mr. Stone is 
a Methodist and his wife belongs to the Gillum family, one of the well-known Methodist 
families of Lincoln County. This is a fine family of children and they are to be com- 
mended for their industry and worth. 



50 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JAMES MARTIN BOON. 



Whom we call Master is at once the historical Jesus of Nazareth, 
And that ideal form which becomes more and more glorious as 
Man's mortal capacity increases. — Dr. W R. Nicoll. 



Rev. James Martin Boon was born April 
6th, 1847, in the City of Memphis, Tennessee. 
He is a son of Benjamin F. Boon and Martha 
S. Boon, both of whom were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was 
converted August 12th, 1870, at Kosciusko, 
Mississippi, in a meeting conducted by Rev. P 
A. Johnston, assisted by Rev. Charles B. Gallo- 
way. Five days later at the same place he 
joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
For days he had been under the deepest con- 
viction produced by a sermon preached by 
Brother Johnson, but refused to yield and did 
not until he heard a very tender appeal from 
Brother Galloway. For three days he sought 
the forgiveness of God for his sins and the sal- 
vation of his soul, but as he was not willing 
to make a full surrender, the blessing did not 
come; however, when he did surrender, he was 
instantly and consciously saved. His growth in 
grace has been steady and ever onward and up- 
ward, and today he knows that he is more 
willing to do God's will than ever before, 
that he loves his fellowmen as he once did 
not, and he can truly say, "My heart is fixed, 
O God! my heart is fixed." He was licensed 
to preach September 3rd, 1870, by the Quar- 
terly Conference of the Kosciusko Circuit; Rev. 
P. A. Johnston, preacher in charge, presiding in the absence of the Presiding Elder, the 
Rev. F. M. Featherstone. He was recommended to the North Mississippi Annual Con- 
ference for admission on trial by the Quarterly Conference of Kosciusko Circuit, in the 
month of November, 1870. He was received into the Annual Conference on trial in 
November, 1870; Rev. F. M. Featherstone, P.E., and Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh, presid- 
ing; ordained Deacon by Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh, at Columbus, Mississippi, December 
3, 1871; ordained Elder by Bishop Robert Paine, at Grenada, Mississippi, November 30, 
1873. He has served the following charges: North Mississippi Conference, Indian 
Bayou, one year; Lake Bolivar, one year; Iuka Station, one year; Richland Circuit, two 
years; Macon Station, one year; Wood Street, Water Valley, Miss., three years; Pre- 
siding Elder Holly Springs District, one year; Holly Springs Station, three years; 
Macon Station, two years; Southwest Missouri Conference: Sedalia Station, one year; 
Jefferson City Station, two years; Nevada Station, two years; Brooklyn Avenue, Kan- 
sas City, one year; Booneville Station, two years; Presiding Elder Lexington District, 
four years; Brooklyn Avenue and Olive Street, three years; Webb City, one year; 
Sedalia, one year; Monett, one year; Missouri Conference, Sturgeon Circuit, two years; 
his present charge is the Clarksville Circuit. He has received about fifteen hundred 
persons into the church under his ministry. Five churches were built on his first work, 
one on his second, also the Olive Street church, at Kansas City, and a Mission church 
at Webb City; several parsonages have been built and paid for under his pastorate. 
His education was received at the public schools and the High School in Memphis, 
Tennessee. He was married to Miss S. E. Chew, June 3rd, 1873, and they have two 
children, Bessie, the wife of Dr. Ralph I. Alexander, and Laura Porter, the wife of 
Dr. Walton E. Taylor. Deciding to give himself up to the work of the ministry has 
been the most important crisis in his life. He thinks the Christian College of vital 
importance, if we are to have the best type of citizenship in the state. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



51 




REV. ELLIOTT WHITFIELD REYNOLDS. 



The Churches are bound to be vehicles of the grace of God, 
Living centers of evangelical energy and force, changing ever 
The secret life that is in them into the lives that are to be. — 
Dr. Fairbairn. 

By Rev. E. D. Watson. 

Elliott Whitfield Reynolds, the son of Rev. George A. and Margaret M. (McClana- 
han) Reynolds, was born March 19th, 1834, at Bluestone, Tazewell County, Virginia. 
Both parents were Methodists, his father being a Local Elder and teacher in the Hol- 
ston Conference. When but ten, he joined the church under the ministry of his pastor, 
Rev. John Hyden, but was not converted until two years later under the ministry of 
Rev. J. T. Frazier, then his pastor. Three years later he became convinced of his call 
to the ministry, but tried for some time to shake off the conviction, finally yielding in 
1875, being licensed to preach by the East Tazewell Quarterly Conference, Jeffersonville 
District, Holston Conference, held at Bluestone, Va., September 4, 1875; Rev. George 
Stuart, P. E., and Rev. W. H. Kelly, P. C. He then attended school one year, after 
which he taught school for three years. On June 28th, 1879, he was recommended to the 
Western Virginia Conference for admission on trial, by the Quarterly Conference of 
Raleigh Circuit, Charleston District; Rev. John H. Hendrickson, P. C., and Rev. W 
R. Chambers, P.E. He was received into the Conference at Clarkesburg, W. Va., Sep- 
tember 4, 1879, and ordained Local Deacon by Bishop D. S. Doggett, September 7, 
1879. He was ordained Elder by Bishop J. C. Granbery, October 14, 1883, at Hunting- 
ton, W. Va. He was married to Miss Emma Bird Rider, of Williamstown, W- Va., De- 
cember 21, 1887, and they have one son, Floyd Wilson Reynolds. His appointments have 
been: In Western Virginia Conference, Green Circuit, 1879; Braxton, 1880, 1881; New 
Martinsville, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885; Clarksburg, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889; Guyandotte, 
1890; Transferred to the Missouri Conference and appointed to Montgomery City, 1891, 
1892; Auxvasse, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896; Mexico Circuit, 1897; Jonesburg, 1898, 1899, 
1900, 1901; Ellsberry, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905; Vandalia, 1906. 



52 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MR. DAVID KYLE PITMAN. 



The Substitute has suffered, and pardons are freely dispensed to 
All who come to God by Christ, and the Agency of the Spirit 
Conveys divinest significance of love. — Bishop Marvin. 



Mr. David Kyle Pitman was 
born December 20th, 1805, in 
Richmond, Kentucky, and moved 
with his parents to St. Charles 
County, Missouri, in 1812. He 
died at the home of his son, Dr. 
Pitman, in Kirkwood, April 13, 
1891. He was a son of John 
Pitman, and his mother was 
Mrs. Margaret Price, nee Irvine. 
He continued to live on the same 
farm his father settled, until a 
short time before his death, mak- 
ing an almost unbroken resi- 
dence of seventy-eight years. He 
was twice married, first to Miss 
Caroline Hickman, of Kentucky, 
in 1827, who died in 1832. From 
this union were three children, 
Carrie and Lydia, who died in 
childhood, and Richard H. Pit- 
man, founder and professor of 
Woodlawn Seminary, O'Fallon, 
Missouri. His second marriage 
was to Miss Eliza H. Baker, in 
1834, who died in 1887, making 
his married life with his last 
wife extend through the unusual 
period of fifty-three years. 
There were also three children 
by this marriage: John, now 
Dr. Pitman, of Kirkwood, Miss 
Annie Pitman, who married Mr. 
Wm. S. Glanville, and died leav- 
ing a daughter, Mrs. Edward 
Carter, of St. Louis, and Baker 
Pitman, who died in infancy. 
His life spanned from the first 
to the last decade of the 19th Century — the most wonderful in the world's history in 
its advancement and in its offered opportunity. He united with the church in 1834, 
and in his well-used Bible, written with his own hand, stands this date— "June 30th, 
1834" — which was the date of his conversion. He got religion after the manner of 
the times, by strong wrestling in prayer to God, and he continued to hold fast the 
profession of his faith without wavering. He was converted while going on a trip 
on horseback from Missouri back to Kentucky. From that day forward he continued 
to have access by faith unto that grace that enabled him to rejoice in hope of the glory 
of God. He first joined Mt. Zion church, and then became principal, founder and builder 
of the church at Cottleville, of which he remained a member until removed by death. He 
filled the offices of trustee, steward, class-leader and Sunday School Superintendent for 
many years. From the time lay delegation was adopted, he was regularly elected to 
District, Annual and General Conferences, and in every capacity served the Church well. 
The preacher and the Conference had no more wise or safe adviser. He was connected 
with the St. Charles College from its incipiency until the day of his death. He waa 
just fifty years the President of the Board of Curators. "Uncle David" was a noble 
specimen of humanity, of fine and commanding form, with kind and gentle manners,, 
and sympathetic in his feelings. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 53 



PROF. RICHARD HICKMAN PITMAN, A. M. 



The product of the seed-planting of Cavalry has, up to this 
Time, been but as the first handfuls of the great harvest. — Bishop 
Marvin. 



The Southern Methodist 
Church has rarely ever sus- 
tained greater loss in the death 
of one man than it did, Novem- 
ber 24th, 1893, when Prof. R. H. 
Pitman was called from earth to 
Heaven. He was an honored son 
of Mr. D. K. Pitman, so well 
known in church circles through- 
out Missouri. He was born July 
30th, 1830, in an elegant coun- 
try home near Cottfeviile, St. 
Charles County, Missouri. Those 
who knew him as a boy say he 
was vivacious, manly and ambi- 
tious. He entered St. Charles 
College in 1846, and graduated 
in 1850. He was married to 
Miss Ella Virginia Ward, March 
15th, 1853, and was a devoted 
husband and father to the day 
of his death. He was for a few 
years in the mercantile business 
in Cottleville, after which he 
founded Fairview Seminary (a 
select school for young ladies), 
twelve miles west of St. Charles, 
in 1861, where he labored most 
successfully thirteen years. He 
was then called to the Presi- 
dency of Howard College, Fay- 
ette, Missouri, in which capacity 
he served two years. He then 
returned to O'Fallon, Missouri, 
and established Woodlawn Semi- 
nary, where for sixteen succes- 
sive years he was diligent in 
educating young ladies from 

various parts of the state. In the summer of 1892 he retired from active life and 
removed to California, where he spent the remainder of his life in quiet on a fruit 
farm in San Jose. He was a man of strong personality. He was gentle, sympathetic, 
affectionate, truthful, generous and brave, had a big, warm heart, was fond of his 
friends and forgiving toward his enemies. Socially, he was in the truest sense a 
gentleman. He was dignified, polite and cordial. The rich and poor alike shared his 
hospitality. Mentally, he was far above the ordinary was scientific, philosophic and 
logical; was broad in his views upon all subjects. He was gifted in oratory, was 
magnetic and often profound. While Mr. Pitman was an admirable character from 
whatever side we view him, he was pre-eminently a Christian, He was converted at 
a camp meeting at Old Mt. Zion, St. Charles County, in 1849. If nothing more could 
be said of him, we would say enough in declaring that h? 1 was a man whose life 
was dauntless in his passionately loving allegiance to Jesus Christ. One so gifted in 
prayer was never known. A friend said, "Heaven and earth never seemed so to blend 
as when he heard Mr. Pitman pray." For more than twenty years he was Sunday 
School Superintendent. There was no abatement in his religious zeal; he seemed to 
have a real passion for leading souls to Christ. His life is the source of a stream of 
Christian influence which deepens and widens with the flight of time, and shall continue 
so to do until those who heed his precept and follow his example shall put on im- 
mortal robes and with the beloved departed mingle their voices in hymns around the 
throne. This page has been presented by his daughter, Mrs. Jennie Pitman Orr, of 
St. Louis. 




54 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV DANIEL T. SHERMAN. 



His God-ward relation was always close and intimate. 

— Dr. D. R. McAnally. 



The sainted Daniel T. Sherman was the son of Daniel Sherman and Sylvia Sher- 
man, both of whom were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was born 
pi New York, March 21st, 1816. He was converted at Ebenezer Camp Ground in 
Warren County, Missouri August 8th, 1834, and united with the church then and 
there. The preachers were Rev. R. H. Jordan and Rev. Nelson R. Bewley. To his 
mother, under God, he felt more indebted than any other. Her teaching and godly 
example had a most potent influence in his early and after manhood life. He was im- 
pressed in childhood days with the necessity of salvation, so that for years he was 
resolving to give his heart to the Saviour, but did not fully surrender to Him until his 
eighteenth year. His conversion was clear and its witness satisfying to his heart. Soon 
after his conversion he was more and more impressed with the need of a full salvation 
and found great help in reading Mr. Wesley's Plain Account of Christian Perfection. 
He had preached the doctrine for forty years, but never saw nor realized clearly its 
simple condition of attainment, until at a meeting held in his own charge in March, 
1879, when he felt in his heart perfect rest, perfect peace and perfect love. In Sep- 
tember, 1837, he was admitted into the Annual Conference that met in St. Louis, Mis- 
souri; Bishop Soule was the Presiding Bishop, and Rev. A. Monroe, Presiding Elder. 
He was ordained Deacon at the session of the Conference at Fayette, by Bishop T. A. 
Morris, and was received the same year into full connection; was ordained Elder by 
Bishop Soule in 1845. His first appointment was the Bowling Green Circuit, 1837; 
Richmond, 1838; Columbia, 1839; traveled Danville Circuit, 1845-1846; Bowling Green, 
1847; St. Charles Circuit, 1848; Warrenton, 1849-1850; Savannah, 1851-1852; Hannibal 
Station, 1853. In 1866 he took work in the Illinois Conference, and was a member 
of that Conference seven years, and was then transferred by Bishop E. M. Marvin to 
the Missouri Conference, performing his work loyally and faithfully until he was 
superannuated in September, 1881. Some five or six churches were built or projected 
under his ministry, and one parsonage. He was twice married. His first marriage 
was to Mrs. Sylvia Jane Bewley, the widow of Rev. N. R. Bewley, January 11th, 1838. 
Five children were born of this union, only two of whom are living, Joseph N. Sherman 
and Mrs. Eliza R. Williams, of Colorado. His second marriage was to Miss Clara 
Howard in St. Charles County, Missouri, October 26th, 1849. By this marriage he 
had nine children, four of whom are living. Mrs. Sylvia H. Bangs, Mrs. Mary A. 
Brown, Miss Ella H. Sherman and Dr. George H. Sherman. Brother Sherman wrote: 
"I have often felt the pressure of strain from want of sufficient support on many of the 
charges I have filled during my itinerant labor. Although cast down, but not de- 
stroyed, the Lord has been very good to me and mine. Knowing what I do of the 
trials and privations of the work of the intinerant ministry, if I had life to live over, 
and I believed God had called me to the work, I would most cheerfully enter the field 
and thank God who had counted me worthy of so high and holy a calling. The Bible 
is and has been during my Christian life the book before all others. It has been the 
habit of my life to read this daily and read it conscientiously." 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 55 



REV. WALTER CLARENCE RUSSELL. 



For God more bounty show'd, giving Himself to make man capable 
Of His return to life. — Dante. 



By Rev. E. D. Watson. 

Rev. Walter Clarence Russell was born on the homestead farm near 
Columbia, Boone County, Missouri, Missouri, September 21st, 1877. His 
parents, Francis L. and Florence E. Russell, were both staunch Presby- 
terians, but having no church of their own near, worshipped in a nearby Meth- 
odist Church. The son was converted in a meeting held near his home in August, 
1898, having joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at Columbia, the previous 
month. He attended the school near his home, then the public school in Columbia, 
and afterwards the Columbia High School. Convinced of his call to the ministry, he 
proceeded to make what preparation his limited means afforded, and accordingly 
attended Central College, Missouri University, and the Moody Institute at Chicago. He 
was licensed to preach by the Fayette District Conference at Clifton Hill, May 3rd, 
1899; Rev. John Anderson, D.D., P.E. He was recommended, March, 1903, by the 
Fayette District Conference at Armstrong, Rev. R. H. Cooper, P.E., for admission into 
the Missouri Conference, and was received on trial at Mexico, Missouri, September 3rd, 
1903, Bishop C. B. Galloway presiding. He was ordained Deacon at Palmyra, Missouri, 
by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, September 3rd, 1905. He was married to Miss Elsie Linn 
Points, February 25th, 1903, and their children's names are Myra E. Russell and Ruth 
L. Russell. His appointments have been: Dalton, 1903, 1904; Laddonia, 1905, 1906. 
While he has been preaching but a short time, he has received about one hundred 
souls into the Church. He gives great credit to his mother's instructions at home, 
and it was through her influence that he was converted. He has felt that God has 
never left him, though at times he came near folding his talent in a napkin and laying 
it away. Yet, through all the vicissitudes of life God has called him to come up 
higher, and now he has the full assurance that he is God's child. He has been a 
diligent reader of good books — Shakespeare, Pilgrim's Progress, Tennyson's Poems, 
Burns and Wesley's Sermons. His views on Christian education are sound, and this 
is what he says: "Our Methodist educational institutions will decide very largely the 
destiny of our Church in the future, and do much to shape the future of our great 
state." 



56 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV EDGAR DAVID WATSON, A. M. 



The Cross is not a human thought; it is an eternal Proposal of 
Love. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Edgar David Watson was born in St. Charles, Mo., Sept, 30. 1865. He comes 
from a long line of Methodist ancestry. His grandfather, David Watson, was a char- 
ter member of the first class formed in Pike County, about 1816, serving as Class 
Leader, Steward, Trustee or Sunday School Superintendent for nearly forty years. 
His father was an honored, able, now sainted, member of the Missouri Conference, 
while his mother, Mrs. H. B. Watson, is still living at Palmyra, a loyal Methodist. 
The son, dedicated to God from infancy, thoroughly trained in religious matters by 
mother and grandmother, brought up under the very shadow of the Church, knew 
nothing in boyhood but to fear God and love the Saviour. He became a backslider 
in his early teens, from which prodigal state he was reclaimed under the ministry 
of his father, and joined the church at Columbia, Mo., in the spring of 1882. He 
graduated from the Missouri State University, A.B., 1886, A.M., 1889; taught school 
for 12 years at Shelbina, Louisville (Ky.), Palmyra, Richmond, Lexington. He was 
married to Miss Bertie Spencer, daughter of the lamented Rev. B. H. Spencer, of 
honored memory, Sept. 5, 1895, and they have two children, Berry Bascom and Bere- 
nice. He was licensed to preach at Palmyra by that Quarterly Conference, March 9, 
1892; Rev. Thompson Penn, P.C. and Rev. John Anderson, D.D., P.E., and was or- 
dained Local Deacon by Bishop C. B. Galloway at Hannibal, Mo., Sept. 6, 1896, and 
Elder by Bishop A. W. Wilson, Sept. 7, 1902. As a local preacher he supplied Park- 
ville from January to September, 1897, and Salisbury from March to September, 1898. 
He was recommended for admission by the Fayette District Conference in April, 
1898; Rev. J. R. A. Vaughan, P.E., and received into the Missouri Conference at Mem- 
phis, Sept. 2, 1898; Bishop W. A. Candler presiding. His appointments have been 
Elmo, 1898, 1899, 1900; Kirkville, 1901, 1902; Glasgow, 1903, 1904; Louisiana 1905, 
1906. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



57 




REV JOHN HENRY SNEED. 



Whoever strives forward with unswerving will, 
Him can we aye deliver. — Goethe. 



By Rev. E. D. Watson. 

Rev. John Henry Sneed, son of Nicholas and Mary J. (Hupman) Sneed, 
was born in Augusta County, Virginia, August 27th, 1864. His father 
was a Methodist, his mother a Lutheran, but the latter soon afterwards 
united with her husband's church. The son was converted and joined the 
church under the ministry of Rev. W H. Woolfe at Trimble School House, 
Virginia, when ten years old. Though convinced of his call to the ministry 
from that time, he disregarded the call for twenty years, until the loss of all his 
property brought him to his sense of duty. Preparing himself as best he could so 
late in life, he answered his call, was recommended by the Mexico Quarterly Confer- 
ence, Rev. J. H. Pritchett, P. C, and Rev. D. C. O'Howell, P.E., and was licensed 
to preach by the Mexico District Conference at Centralia, March, 1895; Bishop W. W 
Duncan, presiding, and Rev. D. C. O'Howell, P.E. He was recommended to the Mis- 
souri Conference for admission on trial by the Mexico District Conference held at 
Fulton in 1897, Rev. R. H. Cooper, P.E., and was admitted at Albany, September 2nd, 
1897, Bishop O. P. Fitzgerald, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop John C. 
Granbery at Fayette, September 3rd, 1899, and Elder by Bishop W. A. Candler, Sep- 
tember 8th, 1901, at St. Joseph. He was married to Miss Virginia Missouri Kemp, 
October 4th, 1891, and they have two children, Arthur Earl and Marjorie Freeta. 
His appointments have been as follows: Kingston, 1897; Ravenwood, 1898, 1899, 1900, 
1901: Agency, 1902; Wright City, 1903, 1904; O'Fallon and Wentzville, 1905, 1906. 
To date he has received over two hundred people into the Church. Under his pasi- 
torate, the Ravenwood church was built, and he remodeled the churches at Old Monroe 
and Mt. Moriah. While he was educated at the public schools of Mexico, Missouri, he 
regards the Christian College as the hope of our country. He regards the_ loss of 
property as a great crisis in his life. He has read with profit the book written by 
Bishop Hendrix, "Skilled Labor for the Master." 



58 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV THOMAS M. TRAYLOR. 



Religion is the regnant power in this world. — Bishop Galloway. 



By Rev. E. D. Watson. 

Thomas M. Traylor was born at Pittsburg, Crawford County, Kansas, January 
1st, 1867. His parents, Job and Sarah A. Taylor, were Southern Methodists in early 
life, but became members of the Methodist Episcopal Church when they moved to 
Kansas in 1866. Thomas was married to Miss Buena Vista Birch, March 7th, 1889, 
and she died leaving one child, Myrtle B. Taylor. He was married the second time, 
June 3rd, 1903, his second wife being Miss Tina Barnes. The second child is Frances 
Willard. He was converted at Rolla, North Dakota, March 22nd, 1895, under the 
ministry of Rev. David C. Hunt, a superannuated preacher of the Wesleyan Church of 
Ontario, Canada, and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church at Rolla, North Dakota. 
Becoming impressed with his call to the ministry, he began to study, testify, teach and 
work for the Lord. While carrying on his work on the farm, he superintended a 
Sunday School, distributed tracts, and worked personally from house to house to get 
people saved. Having fully settled the question of entering wholly into the ministry, 
he came to Missouri, and was recommended by the Clarksville Quarterly Conference 
and was licensed to preach by St. Charles District Conference; Rev. Robert White, P.E., 
while Rev. T. P Middleton was his pastor, in April, 1900. The same District Confer- 
ence recommended him to the Missouri Conference for admission, and he was received 
on trial at Fulton, Mo., September 14th, 1900, Bishop J. C. Granbery presiding. He was 
ordained Deacon at Chillicothe, by Bishop A. W Wilson, September 7th, 1902, and Elder 
by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, September 2nd, 1905, at Palmyra, Mo. His appointments have 
been as follows: Laddonia, 1900, 1901, 1902; Center, 1903, 1904; St. Charels Circuit, 
1905, 1906. 

Brother Taylor has taken two hundred people into the Church, and in time will 
doubtless receive many more. He built our elegant new church at Laddonia, which 
stands very much to his credit. In early life he read David Livingston and Moody, 
and longed for the unselfish nature which dominated their lives. In his youth he was 
a devout reader of the Bible, but finally became a doubter of practical Christianity on 
account of the inconsistent lives of many professed Christians. While yearning for a 
higher life, he was a non-church goer for seven years. Some friends persuaded him to 
go to hear a man who had been redeemed from a life of sin, and by this means he was 
restored to the Christian life. He is now one of our trusted men. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



59 




REV JAMES W SLADE. 



The plan and pattern, the invisible frame-work and Ideal of every 
Man's life is Christian. — Dr. James W Lee. 



Rev. J. W- Slade was born March 17th, 1876, in Tennessee. He is a son of J. P. 
Slade and Elizabeth Slade, both of whom were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He was converted at home in a corn crib, and joined the church at 
Corbin, Kansas, when eleven years old. He had been under conviction for two months 
before his conversion, in a meeting held by a Rev. Mr. Summerville. He says it was 
not the preaching, but just the spirit in the meeting that convicted him. As he grew 
older he understood more clearly his duty. For some time he would not give up to 
preach, but since then he has been made to realize the necessity of being fully given 
up to His will and his experience has since been brighter. He was licensed to preach 
by the Council Grove District of the Western Conference in 1899; Rev. H. D. Hogan, 
Presiding Elder, and Rev. D. R. McBee, preacher in charge. The same District Con- 
ference recommended him to the Annual Conference for admission on trial, and he 
was received on trial into the Annual Conference in the fall of 1889; Rev. H. D. Hogan, 
Presiding Elder, and Bishop J. C. Granbery presiding. He was ordained Deacon by 
Bishop E. R. Hendrix in 1904, at Columbia, Missouri. He has served Shiloh and Laflin 
Circuits in the St. Louis Conference, and Rayville, Parkville, Frankford, and is now 
on the Bellflower Circuit, in the Missouri Conference. He has received about two 
hundred persons into the Church. He attended the public schools and Marvin College, 
at Fredericktown, Missouri. He was married to Miss Margarette Elizabeth McBee, 
July 2nd, 1899, and they have two boys, Marvin Ray Slade and James Roy Slade. 
Brother Slade feels that he has been saved with a wonderful salvation, and he shows 
his gratitude to God by a life spent in the service of the Master. He is pleasant socially 
and his people like him. 



60 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV JOHN WILBURN HAM. 



The attitude of the heart is as important as the posture of the 
Mind. — Bishop Galloway. 

By Rev. E. D. Watson. 

John Wilburn Ham was born in Dunklin County, Missouri, April 28th, 1874. His 
father, Thomas F. Ham, was a Presbyterian, and his mother, Mary A. Harkey, a life- 
long Methodist. At eleven years of age he was converted at "Old Harkey's Chapel" 
under the ministry of Rev. Thomas Lord, P.C., assisted by Rev. George H. Adams, now 
in Texas, and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Not until eighteen years 
old did he take any greater interest in the work of the Church than to attend upon 
the means of grace, but he then felt a deep, growing desire to do something for the ad- 
vancement of the Kingdom, and he assumed the obligation in every way he could, and 
finally at twenty-eight years of age, decided to enter the ministry. He was licensed 
to preach at Potosi, Missouri, May 1st, 1902, by the Farmington District Conference, 
having been recommended by the Potosi Quarterly Conference; Rev. J. R. A. Vaughan, 
P.E., and Rev. Harry Whitehead, P.C. He was recommended to the St. Louis Con- 
ference by the same District Conference, and was received on trial by the St. Louis 
Conference of 1902; Bishop A. W. Wilson, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by 
Bishop E. R. Hendrix at DeSoto, Missouri, September 25th, 1904, and Elder by Bishop 
J. S. Key at Carrollton, Missouri, September 2nd, 1906. He was married to Miss Clara 
Hale Parry, September 7th, 1904, and they have one son, Eugene Russell Ham. His 
appointments have been as follows: St. Louis Conference, St. James, 1902, 1903, 1904; 
transferred to Missouri Conference and appointed to New Florence and Trinity, 1905, 
1906. Up to the time of this record he has received about one hundred members into 
the Church. The time of all times in his life was when he decided to preach, after a 
struggle which lasted for six years. His first preference was the law. He mentions 
Black Rock as one of the books which he has greatly enjoyed. He attended Marvin 
Collegiate Institute three years. Of Christian education he says: "The future of cur 
Church in Missouri depends upon the building up and proper equipment of a college 
to furnish education for our boys and girls. Religious education and the future welfare 
of our state are closely connected." 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



61 




REV- JAMES LESLIE ROBERTS. 



Blessed is the man who has found his work; let him ask no other 
Blessedness. — Carlyle. 

By Rev. E. D. Watson. 

James Leslie Roberts, son of Tyre M. and Sallie (Smith) Roberts, was born in 
Boone County, Missouri, February 4th, 1870. He lost his mother when three years 
old, and his father when ten. He was converted and joined the Church at Smith's 
Chapel in Boone County during a meeting held by Rev. H. D. Groves, D.D., who bap- 
tized him and- took him into the Church. He attended the Columbia public school, 
Mexico High School, Central College and Westminster College, though never graduat- 
ing. Having settled the question of his call to the ministry, he was recommended by 
the Fulton Quarterly Conference; Rev. W. A. Hanna, P.C., and was licensed to preach 
by the Mexico District Conferencee of 1897; Rev. R. H. Cooper, P.E., and recommended 
for admission to the Missouri Conference by the same District Conference. He was 
received on trial at Albany, September 2nd, 1897, Bishop 0. P Fitzgerald presiding. 
He was ordained Deacon by Bishop John C. Granbery at Fulton, September 16th, 1900; 
and Elder by Bishop A. W. Wilson, September 7th, 1902, at Chillicothe, Missouri. He 
was married to Miss Maggie Marsh Craig, December 26th, 1898, and they have one 
daughter, Lorene Elizabeth. His appointments have been as follows: Mechanicsville, 
1897, 1898; New Florence, 1899, 1900; Florida, 1901; Winfield, 1902, 1903, 1904; Wright 
City, 1905, 1906. About two hundred people have joined the Church under his minis- 
try, and he has the promise of many a harvest of souls. He has not been an idler, but 
has put his hand to the work. He built the beautiful Wesley Memorial Church, St. 
Charles County. He considers Watson's Institutes as the one great book for him. This 
he has mastered, and it has moulded into a sound preacher of Methodist doctrine. He 
feels that the greatest crisis of his life was when he was left without father or mother 
at ten years of age, and his words are worth quoting. He says : "I have so many 
times keenly felt my great loss, and my entire dependence upon God, that this condition, 
sad as it is to suffer the loss of those who love us most, has helped to make my heart 
more sympathetic, and my life sweeter than it would otherwise have been." He believes 
in the Christian College as the conservator of all that is good in society. 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV. SOLOMON HARMAN MILAM. 



If to the keystone trusts its weight the vaulted arch, 
Securely built it then defies time's onward march. — Goeth. 

By Rev. E. D. Watson. 
Solomon Harman Milam, son of Solomon Milam and Matilda L. Milam, was born 
March loth, 1874, near Bloomington, Macon County, Missouri. His parents and grand- 
parents were all staunch Methodists, and he was trained a Methodist. He was con- 
verted at seventeen years of age in a meeting held in the Macon High School at Bloom- 
ington by Rev. D. H. Root and Rev. Walter Toole, while under instruction of Rev. C. 
W Collett at the altar. He attended the Macon High School at Bloomington, after- 
wards graduating in two schools at Central College, Fayette. He was licensed to preach 
by the Bloomington Quarterly Conference, November 23rd, 1872; Rev. B. H. Spencer, 
P.E., and Rev. J. 0. Edmonston, P.C. He was recommended for admission to the Mis- 
souri Conference by the Bloomington Quarterly Conference, August 30th, 1874; Rev. 
B. H. Spencer, P.E., and was received on trial at St. Joseph, Missouri, September, 1874, 
Bishop John C. Keener presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Holland N. 
McTyeire at Hannibal, Missouri, September 7th, 1876, and Elder by Bishop David S. 
Doggett at Macon, Missouri, September 15th, 1878. He was married to Miss Phoebe 
Ellen Moreman, March 15th, 1882, and they have three children, Kathryn, Fred and 
Ruth Lynn. His appointments have been as follows: Hamburg and Rockport (junior 
preacher), 1874; Lamar (now Elmo), 1875; St. Joseph Circuit, 1876; Hamburg, 1877; 
Bucklin, 1878; Lineville Circuit, 1879, 1880; Barnard, 1881; Savannah, 1882; Edina, 
1883, 1884; Hunnewell, 1885, 1886; Monroe Circuit, 1887, 1888; Shelbyville, 1889, 1890; 
P. E. Chillicothe District, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894; Shelbina Station, 1895; Sturgeon, 
1896, 1897; Savannah, 1898; Principal Macon District Academy, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902; 
Warrenton, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906. He has had the pleasure of receiving more than 
eight hundred members into the Church, and he hopes to receive many more. He has 
built a church on the Hamburg Circuit, and assisted in building the churches at Lake- 
nan and Savannah. Under his pastorate parsonages were built at Lineville, Iowa, 
Hunnewell, Monroe City and Warrenton. He has been a faithful student of history, 
having read such authors as Rollin, Hume, Macauley and others. He feels that he is 
under lasting obligation to his parents for tl^e sacrifices which they made to educate 
the family. He writes: "My supreme desire is to perfectly love and obey God, and to 
live for the betterment of my race." 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



63 



PROFESSOR JONAS JOHN POTTS, A.M. 



E'en silent Night proclaims my soul immortal: 
E'en silent Night proclaims eternal day. — Young. 



By Rev. Bowman D. Sipple. 

Professor Jonas John Potts 
was born near Hillsboro, Loudon 
County, Virginia, May 19, 1821. 
He was a graduate and post 
graduate of Dickinson College, 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He be- 
came an instructor in his Alma 
Mater, and for about forty years 
followed his chosen profession 
as a teacher of languages and 
mathematics. Among the insti- 
tutions benefited by his services 
were the Buchingham (Vir- 
ginia) Female College, and eight 
years principal of St. Charles 
College, Missouri. During his 
college days Mr. Potts was con- 
verted and became a devout 
member of the Methodist 
Church. He was married, De- 
cember 25th, 1845, to Miss Eliza- 
beth Jane Davis, daughter of 
Rev. Dr. John Davis of the Bal- 
timore Conference. For fifty- 
seven years this pair, so well 
suited to each other, walked to- 
gether and shared each other's 
joys and sorrows in such accord 
that Christian character of a 
rare type was the product. One 
who knew them long testifies to 
the perfect congeniality between 
these gentle, kind, pure hearts. 
Memory will fade before the 
scenes and impressions of the 
home life in that home can be 
forgotten. The spell lasts 
through life. The influence of 

Professor Potts in the school room must have been the most helpful. His first pupils 
are now in old age, and his latest pupils are in middle life. Could we receive their 
testimony one feels sure that they would testify to the fact that he helped to shape 
sturdy characters. No man was farther from claiming a superior degree of piety, 
and no man left a deeper conviction in the minds of others that he was not only as 
pure as the sunlight, but a holy man. The gentle manner and voice and the shinning 
face left no doubt in the mind of another that the Lord was controlling that life. The 
last eighteen years of his life were spent in Montgomery City, Mo., m the home of his 
son-in-law, Judge E. M. Hughes. His wife ascended to her reward three years before 
Mr. Potts. These years were spent as a student, and as a teacher in the Sunday School. 
Careful preparation of the lesson, felicitous comments and lectures to the class, and a 
Christ-like personality built up the class and held the old and the young through many 
years. At the end of his eleventh year as teacher it was said that he had missed the 
class but four times. At more than eighty years of age, with ice upon the walk and 
the mercury far below zero, the faithful teacher would start to his class when pupils 
much younger would remain at home. By instinct, by the possession of the highest 
ideals, by the habits of a life time, by the wonderful influence of divine grace, he was 
suited to the work of a teacher. When death left his own heart lonely, and made his 
daughter a widow, he was refined more and more for the home above. After a long 
journey that he might be with his daughter and granddaughter he was planning with 
the children to plant flowers and to attend the Sunday School. Weary from age, yet 
wanting to live, he heard the call of his Lord, and departed this life October 2nd, 1905, 
from the home of his granddaughter, Mrs. E. S. Griffith, in the city of Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, and was buried in Montgomery City, Missouri. 




64 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




HON. WILLIAM OMAR GRAY, A.M. 



The key to every man is his thought. — Emerson. 



William Omar Gray was born in St. Charles County, Missouri, August 20th, 1849. 
He is a son of Henry H. Gray and Martha Gray, both members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. He was converted and united with the Church at Sturgeon, Mis- 
souri. He obtained his education at the public schools and at Central College, Fayette, 
Missouri, from which he graduated. He was married to Miss Nettie Gentry, May 22nd, 
1879, and they have three children, Henry L., Mabel and William Gray. Brother Gray 
is always true to his Church, and gives it his influence and means. His wife is one 
of the best of women, and he has a fine family. He was teacher in Central College two 
years. After leaving there in 1875, he removed to Pike County, Missouri, where he has 
ever since resided. He was City Attorney of Louisiana, Missouri, and Probate Judge 
of Pike County for eight years, and served for several years on the board of curators 
of Central College. He was a member of the General Conference at Atlanta, Georgia, 
in 1878. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



65 




MR. ADAM T. JAMISON, 



Religion has its gentle virtues, patience, meekness, kindliness. — 
Bishop Haygood. 

A. T. Jamison, a resident of Clarkesville, Pike County, Missouri, was born near the 
town of Paynesville, in the aforesaid county and state, on the 20th day of January, 
1829. He was married to Rhoda E. Hewett on the 1st day of May, 1856, by Rev. New- 
ton J. Berryman. To this union there were born six children, four of whom are now 
living. This union was dissolved by the death of his wife on the 11th day of Decem- 
ber, 1870. He was married the second time on the 9th day of July, 1872, to Miss Anna 
J. Dawson, by Rev. W. A. Tarwater. By this union were born five children, four of 
whom are yet living. His ancestors are of Scotch-Irish descent, and settled in Virginia 
in the early part of 1700. His parents moved to this state in 1827. They were Presby- 
terians by education, but were members of the Methodist Church at the time of their 
departure from this life. Mr. Jamison joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
in September, 1853, and has been a member of the Church for more than fifty-three 
years. He has served the Church during a part of this time as trustee, steward, class 
leader and Superintendent of the Sunday School. He has been a member of Clarksville 
Lodge, No. 17, A. F. and A .M., for forty-nine years. He has served his fellow citizens 
in civil positions as follows: Assessor of Pike County, two terms; Mayor of the City ot 
Clarksville, three terms; Notary Public, six terms, or for twenty-four years; served on 
the school board for twenty-five years; served Calumet Township, in the office of Justice 
of the Peace, when his present term expires, twelve years. He is now past seventy-eight 
years of age, and while he is an invalid and has not walked a step for more than three 
years, yet his mental capacities are as vigorous as at any time in his life; for which 
he feels grateful to Almighty God. While he loves God's oeople of every name anr! 
order, he feels peculiarly attached to the Church of his early choice, yet he wishes to 
go on record that he believes the time has come for ore organization of Methodism m 
the United States. "May God hasten the time when it shall be so." 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM 




MR. THOMAS JONES. 



Victors over death through Him, they reign with Him in life for 
Evermore. — Bishop Marvin. 



Thomas Jones was born in Rockingham County, North Carolina, December 25th, 

1821. In 1829, his father moved to Montgomery County, Missouri, and settled where is 

now the town of Jonesburg, which was named for him, and where the subject of this 

sketch lived till his death, November 2nd, 1882. He married Miss Juliet Catherine Camp 

in 1846. To them were born eight children, all of whom are living, five of them in the 

home town, where the widow still resides. He joined the Methodist Church when sixteen 

years of age under the ministry of Rev. Bowman, and was ever faithful to his trust, 

steadfast, abounding in the work of the Lord. He first held his membership at Camp 

Branch Church and was Sunday School Superintendent for twenty-five years and class 

leader a number of years. As long as he was a member of this Church he took it upon 

himself to see that everything was in readiness for the Sunday services; each Saturday 

one of the darkies was sent the four miles to Camp Branch with wood or whatever was 

needed to put the house in order. In later years the membership of this Church was 

moved to Jonesburg, and to the liberality and influence of Brother Jones was largely 

due the credit, and he made possible the church edifice now owned by this congregation. 

He served this church as steward and trustee till the time of his death. He was reared 

by Godly parents in a Christian home. The shouts of his sister, Mrs. Julia Dearing, 

are yet ringing in the hearts of those who knew her ere she joined His glorious presence; 

so when he and his wife established their home, it was a Christian home with ever a 

welcome for Methodist preachers and his greatest pleasure was entertaining such men 

as Marvin, Jesse Sutton, Monroe, Loving, Spencer, Newland and George Smith. He 

was a successful farmer, a business man of sterling integrity, a well known and highly 

respected citizen. He gave cheerfully to all good works. He helped Central College 

when Bishop Marvin was presenting her claims throughout Missouri Methodism. He 

lightened the burdens of the poor, he encouraged the despairing, and by his example 

taught all that it was not only their right but their duty to be happy. The world was 

better for his having lived in it, and to his wife, his children and his grandchildren, who 

are faithful friends and workers for Methodism, he left a rich legacy of his blessed 

memory. Benedictions on the sacred life of a good man such as Brother Thomas. 

Jones. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. CHARLES DISTRICT. 



67 




REV- CLYDE WILSON GOW 



He that believeth on the Son of God hath the witness in himself.- 
St. John. 



By Rev. Chas. 0. Ransford. 

Clyde Wilson Gow was born on his father's farm in Clay County, Missouri. His 
father, M. D. Gow, was a member of the Church of Disciples of Christ, and his mother, 
Fannie E. Wilson Gow, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He 
was converted December 4th, 1883, in a meeting held in the Antioch Christian Union 
Church at Haynesville, Missouri, conducted by Rev. G. W. Mitchell and Rev. J. V- B. 
Flack. He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at Holt, Missouri, being 
baptized and received by the pastor, Rev. J. T. Winstead. He received his education at 
Lawson Academy (Presbyterian) and Central College. He was recommended by the 
Lawson Quarterly Conference, Rev. H. C. Garrett, P.C., and Rev. E. K. Miller, P.E., 
and was licensed to preach by the Fayette District Conference at Rocheport, Missouri, 
April 19th, 1898, Rev. J. R. A. Vaughan, P.E. He was recommended for admission on 
trial to the Missouri Conference by the Mexico District Conference, March 28th, 1899, 
Rev. R. H. Cooper, P.E., and was received on trial at Fayette, Missouri, September 1st, 
1899, Bishop J. C. Granbery presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop W. A. 
Candler at St. Joseph, Missouri, September 8, 1901, and Elder by Bishop C. B. Gallo- 
way at Mexico, Missouri, September 6th, 1903. His appointments have been as follows: 
Mokane (supply), 1898; Paris Circuit (supply), February-September, 1900; La Plata, 
1900; Marceline, 1901; New London, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905. Here he stayed four years 
and rendered excellent service in every way and his labors were blessed with gracious 
revivals every year. He excells as a pastor and organizer, as his work everywhere 
attests. The League and Sunday School interests receive special and practical attention 
and development in all modern methods in his pastorate. His appointment in 1906 was 
Elsberry, where he is now doing excellent work. 




CO 

o 

05 



CM 

O 
OS 



O 

M 

to 



72 

<1 



o 

•H 

in 

<D 


3 
a 



- £ 
W D S 

CO W £ 
r & * 

It. i—( 

co q a 
Woo 

QMS 

^£» 
H S 

Oh WO 
H S 8 

eh © 
P "S 

<J o 

■0 I 

a I 



CO 

i— i 

Q 

CO 

►J 



> 

£ 
ti 






MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



S9 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE. 




REV GEORGE W PENN. 



1 806-CENTENNIAL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 



MEXICO DISTRICT. 



Presiding Elder .A. C. Browning 

Mexico Sta.. ... .CM. Aker 

Moberly Sta.. . 

.R. F, Campbell and J. D. Tussey 
Fulton Sta.. .C. M. Davenport 

Supernumerary, J. H.' Pritchett 
Montgomery City .H. D. Thompson 

Sturgeon Ct.. .J. M. Major 

Centralia Sta.. .J. R. Abernathy 

Hallsville Ct.. ... W. C. Rice 



Wellsville Ct 

New Bloomfield Ct. . 
Mokane Ct.. 
Fulton Ct.. 
Mexico Ct.. 
Auxvasse Ct. . 
McCredie Ct.. 
Rowena Ct. . 
Confer'ce Miss. Evan. 



.J. R. McMurry 
W. B. Lewellyn 

... .J. W Owen 

.1. W- Keithley 

W. A. Smith 

T. P. Middleton 

.G. A. Shadwick 
.H. W Brewer 

. C. C. Selecman 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV. AMOS CALVIN BROWNING. 



The resources of Truth and power in the Gospel are beyond 
Human reckoning.— Bishop Wilson. 



20th iRfin £<= Browning was born at Highland, Doniphan County, Kansas, October 
bers of ?2; MASTS' ^ ?^ ge f Browni «g and Nancy Browning, were min- 
ister in tbP Chnnh? r SC t °S5l ChUrch ' S ° Uth - His father has been a faithful min- 
Missouri Tan^/rv i««r * bout / ft J years as a local elder. He was converted at Moberly, 
the cZ^bTSii 8 \T d6r tbe ™ mstry of Rev. L. B. Madison, and received into 
version and nif^nw^ Februar y 26th 1886 - His conversion was just an old-time con- 
Second 'Onitprlv ?If. m graC ? \*\ he ? n F aduaL He was licen * ed t0 P reach b y the 
T G Whit ISf t ° f Moberly Station, Missouri Conference, in 1889, Rev. 

n^m^ H ' 5 reacher m charge, and Dr. J. H. Pritchett, Presiding Elder- was rec- 
T?Z 1890 anT S re^v P H ^t ^° ? e Al ^ al Conf erence by the Queen City cfrcuTt, 
n September' 1890 • Dr T H P^AH 1 Conference on trial at Fayette, Missouri 
presiding oS n li^ P«tchett, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Joseph S. Key 
sou? in Septembe IRQ i™ fi Bl ^P A C1 l arl £ S . P" Gallowa y at Montgomery City, Mis! 
sour ' n SenteSber' 1894' ft" 1 S d S r i y P 1 * 1 "* E ' R ' Hendrix, at Carrollton Mis- 
souri in September, 1894. He has filled the following appointments- Ouepn fitv Pir 

^B^fc&ld™ IS TwoT^ ^"t" W' ^^^1^01^, ^ 
Won three years H^ i?™T fin^ ^'^l, 116 Station ' three y ears : Plattsbur? Sta- 
niS'riet hJ i.. • ? ow filhl ; g hls thlrd y ear as Presiding Elder of the Mexico 

wa, nhttirfpH t lh Bro °kneld church, and the Kirksville Church rebuilt. His education 
was ma^ed to M^ P V^ C ^ ■*?? Ma ^ ville Academy, at Maryville, Missou?L He 
Roy C Browning * Crei ^ hton ' September 8th, 1886, and they have one child! 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



71 




REV HENRY DEFOREST THOMPSON. 



It is the men who have looked into the face of their Lord who have 
Spoken the words of true progress to their own and to other 
Generations. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. H. D. Thompson is the son of James and Mary Ellen Thompson, who were 
for the greater part of their lives members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
He was born at Christiansburg, Virginia, October 2nd, 1866. He was converted and 
joined the Church under the ministry of Rev. M. V Smith at Fairview, Virginia, 
August, 1886. His conversion was simply the ordinary experience of a penitent 
soul seeking after God. His growth in grace has been constant through the years of 
his Christian life. He was licensed to preach by the Quarterly Conference of the 
Auburn Circuit, in the Holston Conference, August, 1887; Rev. George Stewart, 
preacher in charge, and Rev. W. W. Pyott, Presiding Elder. He was recom- 
mended to the Annual Conference for admission on trial by the Quarterly Conference 
of the Monroe City Station, Missouri Conference, in August, 1891. He was received 
into the Missouri Annual Conference on trial, September, 1891; Rev. J. R. A. Vaughan, 
Presiding Elder, and Bishop R. K. Hargrove, presiding. He was ordained Deacon 
by Bishop Hargrove at Maryville, Missouri, September 6th, 1891; ordained Elder by 
Bishop W. W- Duncan at Macon City, Missouri, September, 1895. The following ap- 
pointments have been served by him: Novelty Circuit, one year; Monticello Circuit, 
four years; LaBelle Circuit, two years; Kahoka Station, three years; Memphis Station, 
four years; Montgomery City Station, two years, his present pastorate. A church was 
built under his pastorate on the Novelty Circuit, and under his pastorate four parson- 
ages have been rebuilt or otherwise much improved. Quite a great many have been 
received into the Church under his ministry. He was for three years a student in 
Fairview Seminary (a private school of highest grade) for teachers, and Auburn 
Normal School for one year. He was married to Miss Nancy Delia Moore. October 
12th, 1892. Their children are James DeForest Thompson, Barney Moore Thompson 
and Samuel Wesley Thompson. The most important crisis in his life was when ne 
decided to give up the profession of teaching for the work of the itinerant ministry. 
Aside from the word of God, his greatest helo has come from the close and diligent 
study of Watson's Institutes and Ralston's Elements of Divinity. He is an earnest 
advocate and friend of the Christian College in its vital and essential relation to the 
progress of the church and the safety of the state. 



7*> 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV CECIL MILLER AKER, A.B. 



Never was heart in such devotion bound, and with complacency 
So absolute disposed to render up itself to God. — Dante. 



By Rev. E. D. Watson. 

Cecil Miller Aker, son of Mr. 

A. D. Aker and Mrs. A. D. 

Aker, was born in Grayson 

County, Virginia, May 15th, 

1876. His parents were both 

Methodists. When nearly grown 

he came to Missouri to live with 

his cousin and attended Park 

College, at Parkville, Missouri. 

He was converted under the 

ministry of his pastor, Rev. J. 

L. Meffert, and joined the 

Church in December, 1895. His 

educational advantages have 

been exceedingly good. He at- 
tended the public school and 

High Point Academy at his 

home in Virginia, Park College 

for three years, Central College 

for three years, graduated from 

the latter, A. B. '03. He was 

licensed to preach by the Platts- 

burg District Conference, April 

28th. 1898, having been recom- 
mended by the Parkville Quar- 
terly Conference; Rev. W. N. 
Giddens, P.C., and Dr. E. K. 
Miller, P.E. He was appointed 
junior preacher on the Fairfax 
Circuit in 1898, and was recom- 
mended for admission into the 
Missouri Conference by the St. 
Joseph District Conference at 
Elmo, Missouri, March 23rd, 
1899, Rev. W F McMurry, P.E., 
and was received on trial at 
Fayette, September 8th, 1899, 
Bishop J. C. Granbery, presid- 
ing. He was ordained Deacon 
bv Bishop W. A. Candler at St. Joseph, September 8th, 1901, and Elder by Bishop E R. 
Hendrix at Palmyra, Missouri, September 3rd, 1905. He was married to Miss Adah 
E. Ross, of Parkville, Missouri, August 2nd, 1899, and the names of iheir children 
are Reka, Leota (deceased) and Ross. His appointments have been as follows: Fair- 
fax Circuit (junior preacher), 1898; Professor in Macon District High School, 1899; 
Cooper's Chapel, 1900; Fayette Circuit, 1901, 1902; transferred to Arkansas Conference 
artu appointed to Hendrix Academy, Stuttgart, 1903; transferred to Missouri Conference 
and appointed to Vandalia and New Harmony, 1904, 1905; Mexico Station, 1906. He 
has had the pleasure of receiving about three hundred members into the Church, 
and he is well prepared to be a real pastor to these souls. Of his growth in grace he 
says: "My growth has ever been the result of cultivation. The more I r-tudy Christ's 
life, and seek to conform to His example, and to the help of the Holy Spirit, my faith 
becomes stronger, my hopes brighter, and my love mce perfect." He is a student of 
books and speaks of help received from reading Pilgrim's Progress, Self-Help by 
Samuel Smiles, and Imitation of Christ. He is clear and strong on the subject of 
Christian Education; these are his words: "The Christian College is the strongest 
bulwark of Church and State. Education must not be divorced from morality and 
religion. The Christian College alone can teach religious principles." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT 



73 




MR. S. P EMMONS. 



The flowers of Paradise bloom in the footprints of the man who 
Reaches the children. — Bishop Fitzgerald. 



Brother S. P. Emmons, of Mexico, Missouri, at present Superintendent of one of 
the best Sunday Schools in the Missouri Conference, has been attendant, Secretary, 
Teacher, Assistant Superintendent or Superintendent of this same school for forty-two 
years. He united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in 1866, under the 
ministry of the Rev. Marshall Mcllhany, and was baptized and received into the Church 
bv Bishop Enoch M. Marvin. He has served as steward in the Church almost con- 
tinuously since 1870. He was first elected delegate to the Annual Conference when 
twenty-five years old and had been a member of the Church but six years, being just 
eligible under the age rule and the membership rule. Mr. Emmons served as Secretary 
of the Missouri Conference Board of Missions in 1877, 1878, 1879 and 1880, with 
Bishop E. R. Hendrix, President and Brother Whitten McDonald, Treasurer of the 
Board. He is now serving as Treasurer of the Joint Board of Finance, having been 
elected to that position in 1895. For forty years Brother Emmons has been engaged 
in the mercantile business. He has a choice Christian home. His wife is in thorough 
sympathy with all religious and philanthropic work, being at present Corresponding 
Secretary of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Missouri Conference. 
Brother Emmons stands high as a business man, and he did much in helping to build 
the splendid new church at Mexico, Missouri. The Church is blessed in the life of 
such a layman as Brother S. P. Emmons. 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV RICHARD BOND, M. D. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 75 



REV- RICHARD BOND, M.D. 



He called to God, in the watches of the night, and in the labors 
And perils of the day, and heard His voice in tender and loving 
Response. — Dr. D. R. McAnally. 



Rev. Richard Bond, M.D., was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on the 18th of Octo- 
ber, 1800. He was reared by a Christian mother who dedicated him to God and im- 
pressed upon his mind the importance of becoming a Christian. He was converted at 
a Methodist camp meeting in 1818, and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church. Verjj 
soon he felt inwardly moved by the Holy Ghost to take up the work of the ministry, 
but resisted the call until the fall of 1823, when he was licensed and preached his first 
sermon, October 19th, 1823, from Psalms 52:14 and 15. On April 6th, 1824, he was 
admitted on trial to the Baltimore Conference held at Winchester, Virginia, and was 
appointed to Northumberland Circuit, where he remained two years. In 1826 he 
traveled with Bishop McKendree, afterwards serving Fairfax, Prince George, Win- 
chester, Westmoreland, Lancaster, Great Falls, Gettysburg, Chambersburg and Holly- 
daysburg. In 1841 he was transferred to the Missouri Conference and appointed Pre- 
siding Elder of St. Charles District, where he remained two years; then to Danville 
for two years. In 1845 he was appointed superintendent of the American Bible Society 
for Missouri, in which office he continued — in the language of the secretary: "The 
indefatigable superintendent" until his death, which occurred March 7th, 1853. 

Dr. Bond was married to Miss Eliza Ana Thompson in Warrenton, Virginia, 
November 17th, 1829. For twenty-four years she shared the joys and sorrows of the 
faithful itinerant preacher, and was truly a help-meet, gladly bearing her part in all 
the arduous work, and training her children in the nurture and admonition of the 
Lord. She was spared until July 12th, 1868, to minister to her children, "Who rise 
up and call her blessed." 

Rev. Daniel Penny, a Father in Israel, in an account of Dr. Bond's death sent to 
the St. Louis Christian Advocate, says: "Dr. Bond possessed many excellent traits 
of character, and it will be long before we see his like again. He was truly a wise 
man in counsel, strong in judgment, active and indefatigable in labors for the good 
of souls, but in the midst of his labors and usefulness he is suddenly removed from 
us. But he will long be remembered with affectionate regard by his brethren in the 
ministry and by the community where he lived for more than ten years." 

Dr. Bond was a man of wide and accurate information, a strong and effective 
preacher, especially gifted in prayer and song. In addition to his theological studies, 
he received the degree of "Doctor of Medicine" from Columbia Medical college at 
Washington, D. C. He was a man of fine social qualities and took an earnest and 
intelligent interest in all the affairs of church and state, and also in the welfare of 
all who came within the range of his influence. Six of his children are now living: — ■ 
Mrs. Sarah L. McGee, living with her brother, Prof. R. T. Bond, at Fayette, Mo., Dr. 
John B. Bond, of Little Rock, Ark., Mrs. M. A. Mcllhany, who makes her home with 
her son-in-law, A. B. Cockerill, of Nevada, Mo., Rev. H. P. Bond, El Paso, Texas, 
and Dr. M. M. Bond of Houston, Texas. 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV CLAUDE M. DAVENPORT. 



Pleasing in form, polished by nature, courteous from the heart, 
He was meant to be the pattern of youth and the ]oy 01 the 
World. — Goethe. 





Rev. Claude M. Davenport 
wa > born in Sumner, Illinois, 
November loth, 1869. He is a 
son of Henry L. Davenport and 
Elizabeth Hawkins Davenport, 
both members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He was con- 
verted and joined Centenary 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, at St. Louis, Missouri, 
June 7th, 1887, under the min- 
istry of Dr. John Matthews. 
After attending the regular 
services at Centenary Church 
for several weeks he was con- 
victed of sin, but was con- 
verted at home while reading the 
Bible. He was licensed to 
preach, February 20th, 1890, by 
thp Quarterly Conference of 
Centenary Church, St. Louis, 
Missouri; Dr. John Matthews, 
preacher in charge, and Dr. W- 
R. Mays, Presiding Elder; was 
recommended to the Annual 
Conference for admission on 
trial by the Centenary Quar- 
terly Conference in September, 
1894, and was received into thr; 
Annual Conference that year; 
Dr. W. R. Mays, Presiding 
Elder, and Bishop E. R. Hen- 
drix presiding. He was or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop E. R. 
Hendrix in September, 1894, at 
Fredericktown, Missouri; or- 
dained Elder by Bishop W. A. 
Candler, September, 1898, at De- 

Soto, Missouri. Appointments filled are: St. Louis Conference, Caledonia Circuit, 
1894-1896; Ferguson Station, 1897; Pacific Conference, Trinity Church, Calusa, 
California, 1898-1899; East Texas Conference, First Church, Beaumont, Texas, 1900- 
1901; supernumerary on account of ill health, 1902-1903; Missouri Conference, Park 
Church, Hannibal, Missouri, 1904; Fulton, Missouri, 1905-1906. About 1000 persons 
have been received into the church under his ministry. Hickory Grove Church at 
Bismarck, Missouri, elegant parsonage at First Church, Beaumont, Texas, were built 
under his pastorates, with several other building enterprises started, but left for his 
successor to complete. His education was received at the St. Louis Grammar School, 
Polytechnic High School, St. Louis, Missouri, Southwestern Electrical Institute, St. 
Louis, Missouri. He was trained for a commercial career, but after entering upon a 
business life, the call to the ministry came, and he obeyed the call at once. Dr. John 
Matthews personally directed his theological studies, and this he values more highly 
than any theological course at any theological school on earth. He was married to 
Mis? Maude S. Forline, June 3rd, 1891, and their children are Rae Eleanor Daven- 
port, who is now dead, Marjorie Ferae Davenport, and Helen Vivian Davenport. 
Drummond's "Natural Law," Van Dyke's "Gospel for an Age of Doubt," and "Gospel 
for a World of Sin," McCabe's "Divine Nescience," and Bruce's "Apologetics," are 
some of the books that have proven beneficial in his Christian life. His idea of the 
Christian College is that it is absolutely essential to the moral welfare of the state, 
and that it is the great bulwark of the Church against unbelief. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



77 




MR. WILLIAM DOUGLAS BUSH. 



Loving Man for Brotherhood and God that lives in Man. — Arnold. 



William Douglas Bush was born November 19th, 1827, in Montgomery County, 
Missouri. His father, Green B. Bush, and mother, Sarah Bush, were both members 
of the Baptist Church. He was converted in February, 1853, under the ministry of 
Bishop E. M. Marvin, and united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at 
Danville, Missouri, at the same time. He had been reared in the atmosphere of the 
Church and Sunday School, but formally decided for Christ in a revival conducted 
by Bishop Marvin. Since the time of his conversion there has been an ever-widening 
view of God's goodness to him and an ever-deepening sense of his obligation to his 
Redeemer. He was married to Miss Emma Owings, November 13th, 1860, and their 
children are Nellie, Eva, Ada, Ida, Charles W., and Arthur W. Bush. He was 
steward and superintendent of the Danville Sunday School for eight years; superin- 
tendent of the Fulton Sunday School for ten years, and has been steward and trustee 
of the Fulton church twenty-three years, and chairman of both boards for the past 
ten years. Brother Bush is a fine business man and one of the best of friends. 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV. ROBERT FLEMON CAMPBELL. 



As bees mix'd nectar draw from fragrant flowers, so men from 
Friendship, wisdom and delight. — Young. 



Robert F. Campbell, son of R. F. Campbell and Nancy A. Campbell, comes of 
Methodist stock. His parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He was born in Johnson County, Missouri, February 9th, 1867. He was con- 
verted very early in life, but did not join the church till November, 1884, under the 
ministry of Rev. L. W. Pearce at Lee's Summit, Mo., in the Kansas City District, 
South-West Missouri Conference. From infancy he was taught to love God. His 
growth in grace has been constant and uneventful. His experience in laboring, suf- 
fering, rejoicing in service to God and for His people has produced rich fruit in his 
own Christian life. In all his labors he has enjoyed the leading of the Lord and 
His grace has ever been sufficient. He was licensed to preach by the Quarterly Con- 
ference of Lee's Summit, Southwest Missouri Conference, December, 1884, Rev. C. C. 
Woods, Presiding Elder, and Rev. L. W. Pearce preacher in charge. He was recom- 
mended for admission on trial into the South-West Missouri Conference by the 
Quarterly Conference of Lee's Summit in the spring of 1888. He was received on 
trial into South-West Missouri Conference September, 1888, Rev. C. H. Briggs, Pre- 
siding Elder, Bishop E. R. Hendrix presiding; ordained deacon at Clinton, Missouri, 
September, 1890, by Bishop Joseph S. Key; ordained elder by Bishop C. B. Galloway 
at Independence, Missouri, September, 1892. The following have been the order of 
his appointments in South-West Missouri Conference: Gunn City Circuit, 1888-1889; 
Garland Avenue, Kansas City, 1889-1890; Carterville Station, 1890-1891; Joplin Sta- 
tion, 1891-1893; Lamonte Station, 1893-1895; transferred to Missouri Conference, 
1896, and stationed at Memphis, where he remained four years; Shelbina Station 
one year; Macon Station two years, and is now closing fourth year at Moberly 
Station. He has received about 2,000 persons into the church. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



79 




REV JOHN DAVID TUSSEY. 



Of what high worth the Vow, which so is framed, that when 
Man offers, God well-pleased accepts. — Dante. 



Rev. John David Tussey, son of George W. Tussey and Lucinda E. Tussey, was 
born November 4th, 1882, at Taswell, Orange County, Indiana, but was principally 
reared at New Albany, Lloyd County, Indiana. Both parents were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted when fourteen years old at 
Old Pleasant Hill Church in Stoddard County, Missouri, in A.ugust, 1896, under the 
ministry of Rev. S. C. Riffle. For almost a week he had been under deep convic- 
tion, but he went to the altar one night and left it all with Jesus and a wonderful 
peace and joy came to him. Ever since the day he turned his face toward God hej 
has been expecting and receiving greater things of Him. Yielding himself more 
and more to His will, he has found himself continually growing in grace and love. 
More and more does the path glow unto the perfect day and perfect love casting 
out fear is his desire and longed-for ultimatum. He was licensed to preach by the 
Poplar Bluff District Conference, April 26th, 1898, at the age of sixteen; Rev. C. 
M. Cagle, pastor, and Rev. H. M. Eure, Presiding Elder. He was recommended to 
the St. Louis Annual Conference by the Charleston District Conference in May, 1900; 
and was received into the Annual Conference on trial at Fredericktown, Missouri, in 
September, 1900; Rev. W. B. North, Presiding Elder, and Bishop W. A. Candler, pre- 
siding; ordained Deacon by Bishop Charles B, Galloway, September 23d, 1902, at 
Farmington, Missouri; win be ordained Elder at the coming session of the Missouri 
Conference to be held at Moberly in 1907. He has filled the following appointments: 
Pocahontas, as supply, one year; Graysboro and Huzzah, one year; McDoe and El- 
lington, one year; Talma Circuit, one year; St. Charles Circuit, one year; Central 
College and Renick, one year; assistant pastor Moberly Station, one year, and is also 
his present work. About one thousand persons have united with the church during 
the years of his ministry. His education was received at the Advance High School, 
St. Charles Military College., and Central Colleee. Favette, Missouri. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Susie Marguerite Griffith Au crust 15th- 1906. Some of the books which 
have proven beneficial to him have been Watkinson's "Duty of Imperial Thinking," 
Lee's "Making of a Man," and many others of like character. 



80 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV WILLIAM MUNFORD POPE. 



It is in the mood and act of prayer that divine things become 
More real to us. — Dr. Gross Alexander. 



By Rev. H. D. Thompson. 

Rev. William Munford Pope is a Texan by birth, having been born at Knoxville, 
Texas, September 27th, 1870. His father and mother were members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, South. His father was for many years a steward and Sun- 
day School Superintendent. He was converted at Troupe, Texas, in April, 1889; Rev. 
F. J. Browning preacher in charge, and Rev. L. L. Pickett holding the meeting. He 
joined the church at the age of ten years, under the ministry of Rev. Albert Little. 
He had been a member of the church for several years before he experienced conver- 
sion. He was greatly moved, felt himself a great sinner, and after making some 
restitutions and confessions, he gave his heart to God and was graciously converted, 
clearly and unmistakably. He is a believer in the Methodist doctrine of perfect 
love, and has experienced a growth in grace. He was licensed to preach by the 
Quarterly Conference of Beaumont, Texas, November 14th, 1891; Rev. G. V. Ridley, 
preacher in charge, and Rev. F. J. Browning, Presiding Elder; recommended for ad- 
mission on trial into the Indian Mission Conference by the Quarterly Conference of 
Checotah Circuit, September 17th, 1894, and admitted into the above Conference at 
McAlester, Indian Territory, in 1894; Rev. J. Y Bryce, Presiding Elder, and Bishop 
R. K. Hargrove, presiding; ordained Deacon by Bishop R. K. Hargrove at Ardmore, 
Indian Territory, November 3d, 1895; ordained Elder by Bishop H. C. Morrison at 
Norman, Oklahoma, November 6th, 1898. He has served the following appointments: 
Checotah, as supply, 1894; Keokuk Falls, 1895; Sapulpa Circuit, 1896-1897; Nowata, 
1898-1899; Muldrow, 1900; Hale Circuit, Missouri Conference, 1901-1902; Cedar City, 
1902-1904; Fulton Circuit, 1904,1905; Sturgeon Circuit, 1905-1906. He has been a 
faithful minister, having received four hundred and eighty-five persons into the 
church. He has built under his pastorates, the parsonage and church at Sapulpa, In- 
dian Territory, a church on the Nowata charge, a parsonage at Hale, Missouri, and 
church and parsonage at New Bloomneld, Missouri. He attended the Southwestern 
University at Georgetown, Texas. He was married to Miss Victoria LaRue, Decem- 
ber 26th, 1894, and their children are Claudia Pope, Madaline Pope and Kenneth 
Pope. They have one child who died in infancy, named LaRue Pope. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



81 




REV JOHN WESLEY OWEN. 



The claims of the Holy Scriptures have been fully admitted in 
My profoundest thought, and have become, therefore, the 
Basis of Faith. — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. John Wesley Owen was born September 26th, 1857, near Black Oak, in 
Caldwell County, Missouri. His parents, Sanford Owen, and Elizabeth Owen, were 
both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted in 
the fall of 1873, when about sixteen years of age, under the ministry of Rev. Mr. 
Adee, at Black Oak, and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, the following 
winter and was baptized by Rev. G. Tanquary. He was converted instantaneously 
and received the conscious witness of the spirit to that great fact. It came as the 
bright shining of the light into his conscious being, dispelling all sense of condemna- 
tion and giving sweet joy and peace. He made some growth in grace during the first 
few years of his Christian life, but did not grow as rapidly as he desired until he 
entered the ministry, and is making more rapid growth now than ever before because 
he is more prayerful and a more careful student of God's word. He was licensed 
to preach by the Quarterly Conference of Black Oak, of the Mandaville Circuit, in 
the spring of 1878; Rev. J. P. Nolan, D. D., being the Presiding Elder, and Rev. H. 
T. Leeper, pastor in charge. Dr. Nolan has long since gone to his reward on high, 
and Rev. H. T. Leeper is a superannuated preacher. The Quarterly Conference of 
the Mandaville Circuit in the Chillicothe District, recommended him to the Annual 
Conference for admission on trial in August, 1880, and he was received into the 
Annual Conference at Richmond, Missouri, in the fall of 1880; Rev. R. A. Austin, 
Presiding Elder, and Bishop J. C. Keener, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by 
Bishop George F. Pierce, September 19th, 1881, at Moberly, Missouri; ordained Elder 
by Bishop Parker at Shelbina, Missouri, September 21st, 1884. Brother Owen has 
filled the following appointments: Milan Mission, two years; Memphis Circuit, one 
year; Queen City and Brashear Circuit, one year; Paris Circuit, two years; Kirks- 
ville Station, one year; La Plata Circuit, one year; Shelbina Circuit, one year; Marce- 
line and Bucklin, two years; Mexico Circuit, four years; Elmo Circuit, one year; 
Savannah Circuit, one year; Skidmore Circuit, two years; Triplett Circuit, three 
years; Jamesport Station, one year; Maysville Station, one year; Pattonsburg and 
McFall, two years; he is now filling his first year at Mokane, Missouri. About five 
hundred persons have been received into the church under his ministry, one hundred 
of this number within the last year. Under his pastorates the church at Queen City 
and the church at Goss were built, and the church at LaPlata was finished, and 
the parsonages at Kirksville and Marceline were built. His education was received 
at the public schools and at Central College. He was married to Miss Lorena L. 
Besse, February 15th, 1881. He says the most important crisis in his life was when 
he yielded to the movement of the spirit of God and gave himself to the traveling 
ministry. Some of the books which have greatly helped him are Marvin's "Sermons," 
Ralston's "Elements of Divyiity," Watson's "institutes," Wesley's "Sermons," "The 
Pastor and Missions," "Quiet Talks on Prayer," and "Quiet Talks on Power." 



82 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME_O F MISSOURI METHODISM. 

REV ANDREW MONROE. 

He lived as in the immediate presence and constant communion 
Of his Maker.— Dr. D. R. McAnally. 

By Re r. B. D. Sipple. 

Rev. Andrew Monroe towers 
up in the history of Methodism 
in the Central West as a 
mighty mountain. He was in 
the early years of the struggle 
when the emigrant crossed the 
mountains and plains to the 
wild regions of the Indian and 
the buffalo. His name should 
have been commemorated in a 
biography of larger propor- 
tions than a mere sketch in the 
minutes. He was born in 
Hampshire county, Virginia, 
October 29, 1792, the youngest 
of a family of eleven children. 
Four of the brothers became 
Methodist preachers. He was 
converted when a youth and 
joined the Methodist Church in 
Hampshire county; licensed to 
preach 1815 by David Young, 
Presiding Elder, and sent to 
Fairfield Circuit with Charles 
Waddell; admitted into the 
Ohio Conference the same 
autumn and sent by Bishop 
Asbury to Cumberland Circuit, 
Kentucky. In 1824 he trans- 
ferred to Missouri and was 
stationed in St. Louis. Mis- 
souri, Illinois, Indiana and 
Arkansas were in the same 
conference. He was returned 
to St. Louis in 1825; St. Louis 
District 1826-7, embracing the 
the entire state; 1828-9, St. 
Louis Station; 1830, St. Louis 
District; 1831, left without appointment by his own request; 1832-35 Presiding Elder 
St. Louis District; 1836-7, Missouri District; 1838, Columbia District; 1839-40, Agent 
St. Charles College; 1841-2, Agent and pastor St. Charles; 1843, St. Charles Dis- 
trict; 1844-5, St. Charles District, and Agent of College; 1846-49, Columbia Dis- 
trict; 1850-1, Fayette; 1852-3, Hannibal District; 1854, transferred to St. _ Louis 
Conference and made Superintendent Kansas Mission District; returned to Missouri 
Conference, 1855, and sent to Fayette District; 1856-9, St. Charles District; 1860, 
Agent for Central College; 1861-2, Fayette Circuit; 1863-4, Brunswick District; 1865, 
Fayette District; 1866-7, Conference Missionary; 1868-70, St. Charles District; 1871, 
Conference Missionary! Brother Monroe was a member of eleven General Confer- 
ences, and was honored more than once with the presidency of his conference when 
the bishop was absent. He filled every important office in the ministry except that of 
the episcopacy. He was twice married, first to Miss Harrison; then to Mrs. Ford — 
two Godly women who aided him in his work. At the conference of 1870 he con- 
ducted the memorial service, and said that they would hold a like service for him 
one year later. On November 4, 1871, he went to Moberly and preached from Isaiah 
xxxv., 1, thence to Paris, where he became too weak to proceed, and returned to 
Mexico to die, after a thousand battles and weary journeys over whole states for 
his Lord. He asked the pastor, Brother Bourland, to sing Rock of Ages, and pray. 
He said: "Tell the brethren to stand up for the integrity of Methodism. Upon you 
younger men now devolves the responsibility of caring for the church. Be faithful." 
Andrew Monroe takes his place in the Hail of Fame of American Methodism along 
with Asbury, Roberts, Soule, Greene, Marvin and others who builded an empire and 
shaped her moral and religious life. The builders of fortunes have been forgotten, 
and their fortunes have scattered as the mist, but these men will shine more brightly, 
and their work will enlarge as the ages pass. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



83 



REV THOMAS J. GOOCH. 



The cloud is lifted and God is clear in His own essential beauty 
and glory forever. — Dr. Bushnell. 



By Rev. B. D. Sipple. 

Rev. Thomas J. Gooch was 
born at Denmark, Madison 
County, Tennessee, June 4, 1832. 
Nothing is known here of his 
early life. The General Minutes 
make the following record: En- 
tered the Memphis Conference 
in 1853 and appointed to the 
Dresden Circuit; Lovelaceville, 
1854; Hickman, 1855-6; Belle- 
monte, 1857; the same charge 
with colored mission added in 
1858; Holly Springs, 1859-60; 
Granada, 1861; Marshal, 1862; 
Rock Springs, 1863. The war 
drove him with his family to 
Alabama. While there he was 
elected president of a school at 
Munford, and also acted pastor 
at Taledega, nearby. In 1866-7 
he was appointed to Sardis Fe- 
male Institute. A transfer to 
the Missouri Conference in 1868 
brought him to Columbia as a 
supply; 1869-70, Glasgow; 1872, 
Carrollton; 1873-4, Mexico; 1875, 
St. Charles! 1876-7, St. Joseph; 
1878-81, Merico; and 1882-3, 
Presiding Elder of Mexico Dis- 
trict. He fell asleep at his home 
in Mexico, May 1, 1884. He 
died at his post like a hero. 
His faith sustained him in his 
afflictions, which were intense- 
ly severe. "I am now testing 
the gospel I have preached to 
others for years." "Do you find 
it sufficient. Brother Gooch?" 
"Oh, yes; it is all I want. Jesus is my Rock: in Him I trust. All is bright. 
I am ready to go." The writer of this sketch was the last young man licensed to 
preach by Brother Gooch as a Presiding Elder. He loved him for his fatherly kind- 
ness on that occasion. He knew the Presiding Elder for so short a time that, at a 
distance of twenty-three years, he prefers to let his memorial in the Minutes speak." 
Another watchman has fallen from the walls of Zion, another soldier of the cross 
has been taken from the battlefield and crowned with victory by the Captain of 
Israel's hosts. His voice, so familiar to thousands in Missouri, which has for years 
saluted the glad ears of sinners with joyous tidings of salvation, will never again 
be heard in this world of sin and sorrow. In labors he was abundant, in work con- 
tinuous, conferring not with flesh and blood. He went wherever duty called him, 
regardless of bad weather and all other difficulties. Every preacher in his district 
loved him with a pure heart fervently, because he felt that in Brother Gooch he 
had a warm personal friend. Among all classes of persons the death of our brother 
created a profound and widespread sorrow. The community where he labored long 
and acceptably, and where he fell, mourned him as one endeared to all. His funeral 
was the most largely attended of any ever held in Central Missouri. The ministers 
of the various churches were present to bear testimony and to weep at the funeral." 
Brother Gooch was a man of strong mind, well poised, a forcible reasoner, able to ex- 
press his convictions, and he was undisturbed by opposition. 




84 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV JOHN REAGAN ABERNATHY, A.B. 



Cast forth thy Act, thy Word, into the ever-living, ever-working 
Universe: it is a seed-grain that cannot die. — Carlyle. 



Rev. John Reagan Abernathy, son of James E. Abernathy and Cassandra Aber- 
nathy, was born in Hamilton County, Texas, October 29th, 1879. His parents were 
devout members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he was converted at a 
camp meeting near Dublin, Texas, under the ministry of Rev. B. F. Gassaway. He 
was received into the Church in August, 1892. His conversion was the natural out- 
come of influences that had been brought to bear upon his early life. His father, a 
saintly man, died when he was but five years old, and his mother and an uncle, Mr. 
M. T. Abernathy, by whom he was reared, impressed upon him the importance of giving 
his life to God. He was licensed to preach by the Neosho District Conference held in 
Carthage, Missouri, April 14th, 1898, Rev. Joseph King, Presiding Elder, having been 
recommended by the Quarterly oCnference of Neosho. He was received on trial into 
the Annual Conference, held in Kansas City, Missouri, in September, 1900, Rev. J. B. 
Ellis, Presiding Elder and Bishop Granbery, presiding. He was ordained Deacon in 
1902 by Bishop Wilson, and Elder in 1905 by Bishop Hendrix. 

His appointments have been as follows: Lamar, 1900; Washington Street, Kansas 
City, 1901 and 1902; Vanderbilt University, 1903; Lamar, 1904; Moberly, as junior 
preacher, 1905, and Centralia. 1906. There have been more than four hundred con- 
versions under his ministry. Brother Abernathy attended Proctor Seminary in Texas 
one year; graduated from Scarritt College in 1900, and later studied in the Vanderbilt. 
He was strongly tempted to accept a splendid education in law, then take up a political 
career, and the fight of his life was to give it up and answer the call of God. McGif- 
fert's "Apostolic Age" and "Gospel for an Age of Doubt," by Vandyke, are books that 
have been of great help to him. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



85 




MR. WILLIAM ROBINSON M'BRIDE. 



All God's claims upon us exist in the nature of things; we do 
Not make them and cannot release ourselves from them. 

— Dr. John E. Godbey. 



William Robinson McBride was born November 4th, 1833, in Boyle County, Ken- 
tucky. He is a son of John McBride and Olivia McBride. He was converted when 
about nineteen years of age, at Danville, Kentucky, under the ministry of Dr. Rob- 
inson, a Presbyterian preacher; he was converted and joined that church. Abo at 
1870, there being no church of any denomination in Centralia, Missouri, Brother 
McBride gave the first one hundred dollars towards building the first church in Cen- 
tralia. His wife being a Methodist, and there being no Presbyterian church in the 
town, he began attending the Methodist church, in which he put his letter in 1875. 
I gather from the church records, and from what former pastors have told me, that 
Brother McBride from this time on lived a consistent, consecrated Christian lite, 
giving largely of his time, his brain, and his money to the upbuilding of the 
church and to the cause of Christ, as fully as possible for a layman to do. Before 
there was a parsonage in Centralia, he was so anxious that God's ministers should 
be suitably housed, he worked unceasingly until a parsonage was built and paid 
for, offering to give a dollar for every dollar given by the congregation which 
promise was faithfully carried out, and in this way the work was soon done. Quietly 
and without ostentation, many were the deeds of charity and bequests to poor students 
striving to gain a foothold. His home was always open to ministers who considered 
it their second home, being free to come and go as they listed. We feel that possibly 
more than any one man in his community he did more to advance the cause ot 
Christ. Brother McBride received his education in the public schools ot Kentucky. 
On January 30th, 1866, he was married to Miss Letha J. Adams, and to them were 
born five children, four of whom are now living, and their names are William b. 
McBride, Edward J. McBride, Thomas L. McBride and Nettie McBride Leavell. 
Brother McBride died February 10th, 1902, and was buried in the cemetery at Cen- 
tralia, Missouri. A good man has gone to his eternal reward on high. 



86 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV. GEORGE ALFRED SHADWICK. 



Truth may enlighten and sanctify the mind and heart in all 
The stages and processes of development. — Bishop Granbery. 



George Alfred Shadwick was born at Litchfield, Illinois, September 3rd, 1879. 
His parents, Robert and Martha Shadwick, were members of the Baptist Church. His 
mother died when he was nine years old; following this bereavement, he went to 
live in the home of Dr. J. M. Tate and wife at Calwood, Missouri, under whose godly 
influence he was brought to Christ. He was converted and joined the church in 1°94. 
He united with the Presbyterian Church, of which he was a member until 1904. He 
says of his conversion : "I have the testimony of God's Spirit that it was genuine. 
His growth in grace has been marked by a deeper love for the word of God and a' 
more earnest desire to do his will. He was licensed to preach by the Mexico District 
Conference in 1904; Rev. J. H. Pritchett, D. D., Presiding Elder; was recommended 
for admission on trial into the Annual Conference by the same District Conference, 
April, 1905, and was received on trial into the Annual Conference in September, 
1905, at Palmyra, Missouri; Rev. A. C. Browning, Presiding Elder, and Bishop E. 
R. Hendrix, presiding. He has served two years on McCredie Circuit, and has 
received into the church about one hundred souls to date. McCredie church has been 
built by him. He received his education at the public schools and two years in West- 
minster College, at Fulton, Missouri. He was married to Miss Rachel P, Laws, July 
1st, 1903, and they have two children, Lois Irene and Mary Lucile Shadwick. The 
most important crisis in his life, he says, was when he fully surrendered to preach 
the Gospel of Christ. He has been a reader of Wesley, Henry Barnes, Spurgeon, and 
other great men of the Church of Jesus Christ. He believes, and emphasizes his 
belief, that the Christian College should have the full and hearty support of the 
entire church. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



87 




MR. DAVID GIVENS ATKINSON. 



The Lord sends every life into this world for a point, a purpose, 
A destiny. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Mr. David Givens Atkinson was born April 8th, 1862. He is a son of Thomas 
J. Atkinson and Mary Fisher Atkinson, both of whom were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, the Pleasant Grove Church, in Calloway County, 
Missouri, the church from which Rev. W A. Hanna, Rev. J. 0. Edmonston, Rev. 
B. D. Sipple, and others came. He was converted in September, 1879, and joined the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, May 18th, 1880, at Pleasant Grove, during; the 
pastorate of Rev. George W Penn. He was converted in a revival meeting. He 
has experienced a growth in grace from conversion. The things he has undertaken 
to do for Christ have strengthened his faith, and helped him on in the divine life. He 
attended the public schools of Callaway County, Missouri, and made good use of his 
time as a student. He was married to Miss Virginia Gregory, and they have four 
children, Paul G. Atkinson, Virginia Atkinson, Isabel Atkinson and David G. Atkin- 
son, Jr. He says his acceptance of Jesus as his shepherd, guide and partner m this 
life and his advocate in the judgment day, has been the most important crisis m his 
life. His pastor, Rev. G. A. Shadwick, writes of him: "Brother D. G. Atkinson 
is an official member of our church at McCredie, Missouri. Brother Atkinson is a 
very faithful man in the church, willing to make great sacrifice for religious work 
and never tiring of the duties that come to him as a member. He was instrumental, 
with others, in the building of the new church here, contributing liberally and work- 
ing diligently. He is a man of good standing in every way. He is worthy a place 
in the Centennial Volume." 



88 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JOHN M. MAJOR. 



No man in human society gathers such a harvest of kindly 
Feeling as the shepherd of souls, none is held in such grateful 
Memory. — Ian Maclaren. 

By Rev. T. H. B. Anderson, D.D. 

A legend informs us that a 
chasm opened in Rome. Every 
effort was made to fill it, but 
unavailing. Oracles were con- 
sulted; at last one gave forth 
the response that "The most 
precious thing in Rome must 
be cast into it." A Roman lieu- 
tenant, clad in mail, leaped into 
it, and it closed above him. 
Brother Major, as the reader 
will see, has cast into his min- 
istry the most "precious things." 
Nothing but a divine impulse 
could have kept him at its level. 
He was balked at every point 
by failing health. Estopped at 
Southern University; at Vand- 
erbilt; in Colorado — rested a 
year; failed again, and then 
transferred to the Missouri Con- 
ference. Many would have 
given up the work, and gone to 
secular pursuits. "Though he 
slay me, yet will I trust him.'" 
Heroic man! He belongs to 
the class who "follow the Lamb 
mmmr t' / whithersoever He goeth." Jesus 

w**^' , 1 / goes into trials, afflictions, fiery 

furnaces, lion's dens, prisons, 
poverty. He is always there 
before His people come hither. 
He walked in flames with the 
Hebrew children; locked lion's 
jaws, and saved Daniel; and has 
been Brother Major's pillar of 
cloud and fire. In God's eye he 
has reached as sublime height 
in the ministry as the brother who had health. He has "glorified God in the fires;" 
suffered his will. 

First — He belongs to the toilers — men who cultivate Immanual's land. Bishops 
and Presiding Elders have their work; but the pastor, talk as we may, is the cen- 
tral stream. Without him there would be neither Districts not Conferences. The 
circuit rider is as necessary to the integrity and success of Methodism as the pastor 
of the larger Church. The "supply" may not have the privileges of the Conference 
as others; nevertheless he can preach, hold revivals, receive members, and baptize 
and administer the Lord's Supper. He has about all there is in it. Brother Major 
has seals to his ministry; has contributed more than many who had no hand to hand 
struggle with physical infirmities. Eight hundred accessions mean that many, not 
all, were saved. The world is therefore better by reason of his labors and presence. 
Springs are flowing where there was sterility and death. 

Second — We never heard him preach, but an Epworth League address at Macon 
City was as clear as the light; the actinic ray was manifest. A brother assures 
that he is a great preacher — one of our strong men. His face, tones and bearing 
are impressive and betoken thought, candor, earnestness. The latter quality wins 
everywhere. Earnest lawyers, doctors, farmers and pastors have triumphs in business 
an r1 in saving souls. Brother Major, notwithstanding Providential checks, can say: 
"This one thing I do." "A double minded man is unstable in all his ways." "One 
thing;" and that a glorious thing — preaching the gospel. The themes are so high, 
the effect, so far-reaching! 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



89 




REV. JAMES ROBERT M'MURRY. 



The Christian is a man of Ideas, because Christianity is the 
Domain of Reason as well as Love. — Dr. William A. Quayle. 



By Rev. H. D. Thompson. 

James Robert McMurry is of Methodist stock. His father, James J. McMurry, 
and his mother, Maria Jane (McElroy) McMurry, were honored members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for many years. He was born at Colony, Knox 
County, Missouri, July 31st, 1867. He was converted and joined the church under 
the ministry of Rev. T. R. Kendall when at the age of thirteen years. His conversion 
occurred at the Methodist altar. Some years later while a student at Knox Collegiate 
in Edina, Missouri, he was, under the influence of the Y. M. C. A., led to a deeper 
and fuller Christian life. He was licensed to preach by the Quarterly Conference 
of the LaBelle Circuit in 1895, Rev. A. S. Bowles, preacher in charge, and Rev C. 
Grimes, Presiding Elder, and by the same Quarterly Conference recommended for 
admission on trial. He was admitted on trial into the Missouri Annual Conference 
at Macon, Missouri, September, 1895, Bishop Duncan presiding. He was ordamed 
Deacon by Bishop W. A. Candler at Memphis, Missouri, September, 1898; ordained 
Elder by Bishop John C. Granbery at Fulton, Missouri, September, 1900. His ap- 
pointments have been: Camden Circuit, Grayson Circuit, Maysville Station, Norborne 
Station, Brunswick Station, Dearborn Station, Lawson Station and Wellsville Circuit. 
A goodly number of people have been received into the church under his ministry. 
He attended Centenary Academy at Palmyra, Missouri, the Missouri State Normal, 
at Kirksville, Missouri, and the South Western University at Georgetown, Texas. He 
was married to Miss Frances Josephine Hopkins, November 22d, 1898. They have 
one child, Josephine Maria McMurry. He says of the Christian College: We must 
endow and maintain our Christian Colleges, for in them is the hope of the church 
and state." Brother McMurry is a clear thinker, a safe administrator, and a 
wise pastor. 



90 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



HUBBARD KAVANAUGH HINDE, A. M., M. D. 

Nunc cognosco ex parte, tunc vero cognoscam prout Cognitus 

Fuero. — St. Paul. 

Now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am 

Known 

Hubbard Kavanaugh Hinde 
was born in Sharpsburg, Bath 
County, Kentucky, January 6, 
1834. After a preparation in 
the common schools and acad- 
emies of the state he was a 
student in the Ohio University 
at Athens, O., for two years, 
and completed his college course 
in the Ohio Wesleyan Univers- 
ity at Delaware, 0., graduating 
in that institution during the 
presidency of Bishop Edward 
Thompson. After his gradua- 
tion at the Ohio Wesleyan he 
studied medicine, and attended 
lectures in the Miami Medical 
College, Cincinnati, 0., and the 
St. Louis Medical College — 
graduating in the latter insti- 
tution under the deanship of 
Dr. Charles A. Pope. Immedi- 
ately upon leaving the St. Louis 
Medical College he was elected 
First Assistant Physician of 
the State Lunatic Asylum at 
Fulton, Missouri, where four- 
teen years of his professional 
life were spent in the study 
and treatment of insanity. Here 
he was associated with Dr. T. 
R. H. Smith, Superintendent — 
one of the dearest friends of 
his life. During the suspension 
of that institution on account 

of the war his home was 

practiced medicine &nr>n a -ff<». fi, i Palmyra, Missouri, where he 

at Fulton, where he remand it, T* h ' Wa f re " elected Physician to the asylum 
College at Fayet^ mS President of Howard p'ayne 

responsible work of educatiAe Jrl! »r,H 6 SP6nt S6Ven years of his life in the 

Pritchett as President of HoI^Sp d Y °? ng women - He succeeded Dr. J. H. 

Retiring £ the President J 3 ^ and ™ s succeeded by Dr. H. D. Graves, 
few .years o g n his'farm ^ A^Sn°^^^:?!5^ C ?K e ** ¥ went, to live for 




PritpViott- n « -6 -V ^u^*tuig g-iris and yoi 

R^l te 1 ?. 4 . °i. H ?!™m Pjyne InA was succeeded by Dr. ED. Graves. 

o± Howarr 1 ™ "* " 

M ^*L%~* ™^r=r£2l\ the h„ m es 5-hiVch3?^ 



in A„rivo^ p ;" " . a J" c ^uneg-e ne went to live ior a 
b?a Mi«« ■ Cou ^ Missouri. His subsequent homes were 
During his" "second vea'r ^1 t^rf V h ? h ° mes of his children. 

Curd of Palmyra who was a Irfl^T rt^l™ ¥ Was married to Eliza Bl T an 
union were born tlnnZiA S radu ate of Christian ColW* at r n i,i m Wo t?™™ +w 



^ura oi ralmyra, who was a ^^nf * >.r V 1 " 111 " e was married to Jiiliza tfryan 
union were born ten children se™ «? ® t? Chris ^ an College at Columbia. From this 

Dr. Hinde united with' tnl m£w ? *t e ll T ing and ma ™ed: 
%"l>± 5» ^ 1 td%s M ctve d rfed C w J h rCh at , M °oreneld ? Nicholas «, 



always taken a deep interest in ^11 ^ nVe f ted + wh <*> a student at Athens, O. He has 
teacher in the Sunday School and t?l rtmei i ts ° f cl ? urch work > has been a constant 
essons for the St. Louis Christian AHvn,T &1 y ?7 haS P re P ared th * Sunday school 
lessons for the same paper Hp hi t ° ^ &nd f ° r a few y ears wrote the League 
to several of the county papers on ™Lp i ° " + a - 9 ont ributor for the Advocate and 
and the Republic of Mexico For r^n ellaneou s to P lcs > including letters from Europe 
Annual Conference, and once was TZplT% h ^ aS > en a dele S a te to the Missouri 
Jenn. He has always been an vmcLtl g - ^ t0 ? e General Conference at Memphis, 
for years has voted the ProhTbiSonT?kPt miS R g ad \ ocate of the temperance causeand 
Kavanaugh and great-grandson of thp rw w- V S ^ C0 V sm , and namesake of Bishop 
camp-meeting, happily converted m tip S^ w *"\ when V s wife came homa from 
was insane. That w £ the begln'n^ she 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



91 




MR. JAMES A. LEAVELL. 



Self-reliance and self-denial will teach a man to drink out of 
His own cistern, and eat his own sweet bread, and to learn and 
Labor truly to get his own living, and carefully to save and 
Expend the good things committed to his trust. — Bacon. 



James A. Leavell was born October 9th, 1851, near Lutre Island, Montgomery 
County, Missouri; his father, Benjamin F. Leavell, and mother, Sarah Nunnelly 
Leavell, were both members of the Baptist Church. He was converted in August, 
1870, at Bethel Church, Readsville Circuit, under the ministry of Rev. George W. 
Penn, and joined the church at the same time and place. His growth in grace has been 
constant and gradual. He received his education at the public school in Callaway 
County, and also at Westminster and William Jewell Colleges. He was married twice, 
first to Miss Addie Nunnelly, November 11, 1875, who died March 15, 1880, and to 
Miss America Davis, November 30th, 1881, and his children are B. Roy, Addie Leta, 
Sarah Ann and James Reader Leavell. Brother Leavell has been in the banking 
business for years, and his standing is of the best. His family is a blessing to our 
Fulton church. Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress," Ingraham's "Pillar of Fire," and 
"Prince of the House of David," are books that have greatly helped him in his 
Christian life. He was Sunday School Superintendent for ten years at Bethel 
Church; Steward about thirty-five years; Treasurer of Conference Board of Church 
Extension since 1898; Treasurer of Conference Board of Education since 1903; dele- 
gate to the Annual Conference since 1896; member of the General Conference, 1902- 
1906; Member of Board of Curators of Central College since 1903. 



92 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV THOMAS PRICE MIDDLETON. 



Christianity is in form the Supernatural Kingdom and Working 
Of God in the earth. — -Dr. Bushnell. 



By Rev. H. D. Thompson. 
Rev. Thomas Price Middleton was born in Moweaqua, Illinois, June 7th, 1871. 
His father, Thomas G. Middleton, was a member of the Presbyterian church. His 
mother was a member of the Baptist Church for many years, but united with the 
Methodist Church a short time before her death. He was converted under the 
ministry of Rev. Fielding Marvin, D. D., December 4th, 1889, at Monroe City, 
Missouri, and joined the church December 11th, 1889. His conversion was real and 
plain; he was converted at the old-fashioned Methodist altar. He has grown in 
grace and a deeper and better understanding of the things of God. He was licensed 
to preach by the Quarterly Conference of Monroe City Station, in December, 1893; 
Rev. W. H. Younger, preacher in charge, and Rev. John Anderson, D. D., Presiding 
Elder; was recommended for admission on trial into the Missouri Conference by 
the District Conference of the Macon District in 1895; was received on trial Septem- 
ber, 1895; Rev. C. Grimes, Presiding Elder and Bishop W. W. Duncan, presiding; 
was ordained Deacon at Memphis, Missouri, in September, 1898, by Bishop W. A. 
Candler; ordained Elder by Bishop John C. Granbery at Fulton, Missouri, September, 
1900. His appointments in order of time are as follows: Sue City Cii'cuit, 1894- 
1895; Excello Circuit, 1895-1896; Laddonia Circuit, 1896-1898; Clarksville and Els- 
berry Circuit, 1898-1899; Winfield Circuit, 1899-1900; Mokane Circuit, 1900-1902; 
Rowena Circuit, 1902-1903; Wellsville Circuit, 1903-1906; Auxvasse Circuit, 1906. He 
has received into the church five hundred and thirty-two members. The parsonage 
on the Laddonia Circuit was built under his ministry. His educational training was 
obtained in Monroe City High School, Monroe City Academy, and the Hannibal Dis- 
trict High School at Palmyra, Missouri. He was married to Miss Lula Rouse, Novem- 
ber 3d, 1897, and their children are Warren Candler Middleton and Warden Rouse 
Middleton. The surrender to the will of God to preach His word, he says, was the 
most important crisis in his life. The books of the course of study, Hudson's 
"Armour," and Wesley's "Sermons" have been very helpful to him. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



93 



REV ISAAC WOODWARD KEITHLEY. 



To be righteous makes all things new. — Dr. Frederick W Robertson. 



By Rev. H. D. Thompson. 

Rev. Isaac Woodward Keith- 
ley was born at Sparta, Tennes- 
see, November 10th, 1854. His 
parents, Thomas R. Keithley, 
and Susan A. Keithley, were 
members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. In his 
early years he was converted, 
but did not unite with the 
church until August, 1872, while 
attending a camp-meeting con- 
ducted by Rev. J. J. Comer. He 
was licensed to preach by the 
Quarterly Conference of the 
Sparta Circuit in the Tennessee 
Conference, November 10th, 
1877; Rev. J. G. Maloy, pastor, 
and Rev. R. P. Ransom, Presid- 
ing Elder. His recommenda- 
tion for admission on trial was 
from the Quarterly Conference 
of the above Circuit in August, 
1878. He was received into the 
Annual Conference on trial, 
October 10th, 1878; Rev. R. P. 
Ransom, Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh, pre- 
siding. He was ordained Deacon 
by Bishop Robert Paine at Pu- 
laski, Tennessee, October 17th, 
1880; ordained Elder by Bishop 
J. C. Keener at Franklin, Ten- 
nessee, October 22nd, 1882. His 
appointments have been : Low- 
ryville Circuit, Tennessee Con- 
ference, 1878-1879; Lawrence- 
burg: Station, 1879-1880; Tyre 
Sm-ings, 1880-1882; Pope and 

Mount Zion Station, 1882-1883; Bethesda Circuit, 1883-1885; Shady Grove Circuit, 
1885-1887; Kedron Circuit, 1887-1890; West Point Circuit, 1890-1892; he then 
located at his own request and served as a supply for three years. Finding his old 
Conference (Tennessee Conference), full when he came up for readmission, he joined 
the Methodist Episcopal Church and was admitted into the Central Tennessee Con- 
ference of this church. In this conference he was sent to Cooksville Circuit, where 
he remained only six months and was transferred to the St. Louis Conference 
of the same church and assigned to Jasper City Church where he remained for one 
year and six months. His next appointment was Golden City, Missouri, where he 
remained two years. He was then transferred to the Illinois Conference and 
stationed at Pittsfield for one year; then to Plainville Circuit for three years. He 
then joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and was admitted into the 
Missouri Annual Conference, September, 1903. In this Conference he has served 
Monroe City Circuit two years; and Fulton Circuit, his present charge, two years. 
About one thousand persons have been received into the church under his ministry. 
Under his pastorate, Hitchcock's Chapel, Mount Pleasant, Gideon, Hebron and Rollie 
Chapel Churches were built. He attended Eaton Institute and White Seminary. He 
has been twice married. His first wife was Miss Alice Williams, whom he married 
February 22d, 1882. His present wife was Miss Maggie Campbell Scales. Ihey 
were married October 25th, 1892, in Nashville, Tennessee. Their children are Walter 
Hill Keithley and Helen Annie Keithley. 




94 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV CHARLES WILLIAM COLLETT. 



Life makes the soul dependent on the dust; death gives her 
Wings to mount above the spheres.— Young. 



Charles William Collett was 
born March 31st, 1831, in Wood 
County, Virginia, in v/hat is now 
known as West Virginia. Both 
of his parents, Benjamin Collett 
and Margaret Collett, were 
members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He 
was converted at Long Branch 
camp-ground, Macon County, 
Missouri, in 1854, under the 
ministry of Rev. A. P. Linn, 
and joined the church at the 
same meeting, taking member- 
ship at Bloomington, then the 
County seat of Macon County. 
He was induced to go to the 
altar for prayer, and went from 
the altar to the grove with Rev. 
Alex. McDuffy, where he was 
most wonderfully blessed and 
made to feel the assurance of 
peace with God and men. His 
conversion was very clear and 
definite. His growth in grace 
for some time was slow, but he 
held on by constantly calling on 
God for help, and while attend- 
ing a camp-meeting at Shiloh 
Camp ground, he received a sec- 
ond baptism of the Holy Ghost 
and went on his way rejoicing. 
He was licensed to preach by 
the Quarterly Conference ^of 
Bloomington Circuit in 1858; 
Rev. James Penn preacher in 
charge, and Rev. Walter Toole, 
Presiding Elder ; recommended 
to the Annual Conference by the same Quarterly Conference in 1859, and was ad- 
mitted to the Annual Conference on trial in 1859; Rev. Walter Toole, Presiding Elder, 
and Bishop Paine presiding. He was elected Deacon at Glasgow in 1861, but not 
ordained because no Bishop could cross the army line; he was elected to Elders 
orders at Mexico, Missouri, in September, 1864; Rev. Andrew Monroe presiding, there 
still being no Bishop within reach. He was ordained Deacon and Elder both the 
same day by Bishop Kavanaugh, at Hannibal, Missouri, in August, 1865. Appoint- 
ments filled are: Kingston Circuit, 1859-1861; Unionville and Green Castle Circuit, 
with twenty-four preaching places; the next year, there being no conference, the Pre- 
siding Elder appointed him as substitute on the Paris work; in 1864 was appointed 
to what was then known as the Thomasville work, which he found so devastated by 
war that he was compelled to make his living by giving his services wherever he could; 
Madison Circuit, 1865-1866; New Market Circuit, 1866-1868; Santa Fe Circuit, 1868- 
1870; Memphis, 1870-1872; Santa Fe, 1872-1874; Florida, 1874-1875; Vandalia, 1875- 
1876; Cedar City, 1876-1878; Ashland, 1878-1879; Fulton, 1879-1880; Readsville, 1880- 
1881; 1881-1882, he was sick, and hence was superannuated; Santa Fe, 1882-1883; 
Warrenton, 1883-1884; Wellsville. 1884-1885. The first church ever built in Kingston, 
Missouri, was under his pastorate, and he built one parsonage and bought one. He 
received his education at the common schools of his time. He was married September 
8th, 1864, to Miss Addie T. Maupin, and their children are Orvid C, Lovick L., Mattie 
W.. Ann E., Eulalie O., and Charles W Collett. His being superannuated is considered 
by him as the most important crisis in his life. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 




REV L. B. MADISON. 



The world recedes, it disappears! 

Heaven opens on my eyes! my ears with sounds seraphic ring! 

Alexander Pope. 

By Miss Beulah Madison. 
Rev. L. B. Madison was born in Albermarle County, Virginia, November 30, 
1835. 

He was converted and united with the church August 20, 1850, at Gentry's meet- 
ing house, Albermarle County, Va., was licensed to preach in August 1860 in Alle- 
ghany County, Va., was received on trial in the Western Virginia Conference in 1861; 
was ordained Deacon in 1864, at Lynchburg, Va., by Bishop Early; ordained Elder 
at Baltimore, Maryland, by Bishop Wightman in 1869. His first charge was the 
Lafayette Circuit in the Virginia Conference, where he remained one year, and was 
then appointed chaplain of the fifty-eighth Virginia regiment in the Confederate army, 
where he served until the close of the war. In the fall of 1865 he was sent to Nelson 
Circuit, where he remained two years, and in 1867 was appointed colporteur for the 
American Tract Society; later in the same year he united with the Baltimore Con- 
ference and was appointed to Fauquier Circuit, where he remained one year. He 
was next assigned to Buchanan Circuit; in 1869 and 1870 he was in charge of Mont- 
gomery Circuit; in 1871 he transferred to the West Virginia Conference and was sent 
to Brownstown and Cedar Grove, where he was pastor until 1873, when he was ap- 
pointed Presiding Elder of the Charleston District, and served in that capacity until 
1876, when he was sent to Guyandotte and Huntington, where he remained four years. 
In 1880 he was sent to Greenup and Grayson, Kentucky, and remained there two 
years; in 1882 he went to Barboursville, West Virginia, remaining there two years, 
and in 1884 he transferred to the Missouri Conference. His first charge in Missouri 
was Osborn Circuit, where he remained one year; he was then assigned to Moberly 
Station, where he served three years; in 1888 he was sent to Liberty, and in 1890 
to Lawson; in 1893 to Parkville: in 1895 to Platte City and Weston; in 1896 to Guil- 
ford; in 1898 to Queen City; in 1899 to Edina, and in 1903 to La Plata; this being his 
last charge. In the fall of 1904, at his own request, his name was placed upon the 
superannuated list. Shortly after Conference he moved to Moberly and was appointed 
Assistant Pastor of the Madison Circuit. On December 9, 1905, he heard the call of 
the Master to come up higher. 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV- WILLIAM WALTON JONES. 



That ills corrosive, cares importunate, are not immortal too, 

Death! is thine. — Young. 

By Rev. Bowman D. Sipple. 
Rev. William Walton Jones was born in Cynthiana, Kentucky, May 23, 18Z^. 
His early life was spent in Howard County, Missouri. From 1838 to 1842 he sold 
goods in Bolivar, Missouri. He was converted at the Mitchell Campground, in August, 
1841, Rev. David Ross preaching. He united with the Methodist church, was licensed 
to exhort by Rev. S. S. Colburn, and licensed to preach in 1842 by the Greenfield Quar- 
terly Conference; Rev. J. M. Kelley, P. C, and Rev. Thos. Wallace, P. E. For a time 
he was junior preacher with Elijah Perkins on the Springfield Circuit. He was re- 
ceived on trial in the Missouri Conference in 1843, together with a number of msn 
who served long and well the church. His first appointment was Osceola, and second 
Booneville Circuit. When the St. Louis Conference was organized he remained with 
that section, and traveled the following works, each one year: Wesley Chapel, St. 
Louis, Warsaw, Lexington, Arrow Rock, Warsaw District, Booneville Circuit, and 
located in 1851. Deacon's orders were received in 1845 and Elder's in 1847. Mr. 
Jones was readmitted into the Missouri Conference in 1868 and traveled the following 
works: Fulton Circuit, two years; Chillicothe District, three years; St. Charles 
District, three years; Fayette Circuit; Keytesville Station, and St. Joseph District, 
one year each; Mexico District, three years; Huntsville Circuit, two years; and 
Roanoke, one year. In 1885 he was transferred to the Southwest Missouri Conference 
and traveled the following works: Longwood, Appleton City, Corder, one year each. 
In October, 1888, he received appointment to Gilliam. Death came to him one week 
after the appointment, October 16, 1888. Rev. William W Jones was a man of 
commanding appearance, resembling in a striking way Robert E. Lee; a princely 
preacher and a gentleman of the first rank in the home. Full of life as a young man, 
the grace of God changed him so that his unusual powers were devoted to the work 
of the church. The first Quarterly Conference the writer of this sketch remembers 
was the fourth on the Fulton Circuit in August, 1868. The subject of the pastor for 
the following year was up. Father Selby spoke of W. W Jones as the man he pre- 
ferred to all others for the peculiar needs of the chargs at that time. Somehow the 
preference was regarded and the preacher was not a disappointment. What power 
in those deep, dark eyes, and what grace in that manly form! 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



97 



REV ROBERT GARLAND LOVING, A. M. 



The spirits of great men, like immortal ships, sail the ocean of 
Time, bearing the treasures of civilization. — Dr. James W Lee. 



By Rev. Bowman D. Sipple. 

Robert Garland Loving, A. M., 
was born in Nelson County, Vir- 
ginia, February 1, 1808; was 
converted under the ministry of 
Dr. Wm. A. Smith in the same 
county and united with the 
Methodist Church in 1827; en- 
tered Augusta College, Ken- 
tucky, in 1829, from which insti- 
tution he received his A. B. 
degree in 1832, and A. M. in 
1835 (these two diplomas, signed 
by such men as H. B. Bascom, 
Professor Moral Science, Martin 
Ruter, J. S. Tomlinson and B. 
H. McGown, with Peter Akers 
as Agent, are in Central College 
Library) ; was licensed to preach 
in Lynchburg in 1835, and trav- 
eled one year in Virginia; mar- 
ried, located and founded the 
Buckingham Collegiate Institute 
for young women, the first of 
the kind in Virginia and one of 
the first in the United States. 
The ample fortune of Mr. and 
Mrs. Loving was lost by turning 
it over to pay the last indebted- 
ness on the institution. The fel- 
low teacher who received the 
money misappropriated it, leav- 
ing Mr. Loving with nothing I)ut 
his wife's slaves. About twelve 
years were spent in this work, 
probably 1835-1847. Some time 
had been previously spent teach- 
ing in Randolph-Macon. A year 

or more was spent in teaching n . . , 

in Cumberland, Va. Mr. Loving came to Missouri in 1849 and taua;nt in Brunswick; 
entered the Missouri Conference in 1852 and traveled the Fayette Circuit two years; 
was in charge of Weston High School in 1854-55, transferred to Louisville Conference 
in 1855, returned to Missouri in 1856, and traveled Auburn Circuit, 1856-7; 1 lint Mill, 
1858-9; Warrenton, 1860-61; 1862, no minutes; 1863, Ashley; 1864, Auburn; 1865-b, 
High Hill; 1867, Ashley; 1868-9, Cottleville; 1870, Wentzville; 1871, Auburn; 1872-3, 
New Florence; 1874, Madison; 1875, Williamsburg; 1876, Pleasant Grove; 1877 Mont- 
gomery City; 1878, Cedar City; 1879, until his death in Montgomery City, July Al, 
1882, he held a superannuated relation. Mr. Loving married Mary E. Worsham, ot 
Amelia County, Virginia, in 1835, who was born May 4, 1809, and died June 24, l»'»; 
a woman in every way worthy of the good man she toiled and suffered with tor 
forty years. . ■, • 

Mr. Loving and Miss Harriet Nichols, of Montgomery County, were married m 
1881 and lived happily together until his death at the age of seventy-lour years. 

Robert G. Loving was a polished Christian man, and has left no more important 
work than the record as one of the thirty men named in the act ot the legislature 
of Missouri March 1, 1855, as incorporators of Central College at Fayette, Missouri, 
Several of these men were college bred, and more than one, along with himself, hem 
diplomas of graduation. There is much between the lines of the record ot his conver- 
sion under Dr. Wm. A. Smith in 1827 and the election of the latter as President ot 
the College he helped to found in Missouri in 1868. The name of such a man should 
be held in everlasting remembrance. Brother Loving and his wite are buried at 
Troy, Missouri. 




98 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. WILLIAM BURDETT LLEWELLYN. 



A blissful Immortality to them whose holiness on earth, shall 
Make the Spirit capable of Heaven. — Wordsworth. 



Rev. William Burdett Llew- 
ellyn, the son of Samuel and 
Rachel Llewellyn, was born 
near Albany, Cumberland Coun- 
ty, Kentucky, April 1st, 1844. 
He was converted in a meeting 
held by Rev. Martin Baker, Rev. 
Hiram Parish and Rev. William 
Nea.1, Cumberland Presbyterian 
pastors. This meeting was held 
at Flatrock in Cumberland 
County, Kentucky, in 1862. He 
was taken into the church at 
that time. He was deeply and 
pungently convicted of sin and 
sought the Lord at the old fash- 
ioned mourner's bench till he 
came in possession of a happy 
pardon. From that good day 
his growth in the grace of God 
has been constant and progress- 
f ive. He was licensed to preach 
by the Quarterly Conference of 
Green River Circuit in the Ken- 
tucky Conference in 1869; Rev. 
William Slate being preacher in 
charge, and Rev. William Alex- 
ander, Presiding Elder. He 
was recommended for admission 
on trial into the Kentucky Con- 
ference by the Quarterly Con- 
ference of the above charge in 
1869; was received on trial into 
the Kentucky Conference in 
1869; Rev. M. K. Jones, Pre- 
siding Elder, and Bishop H. N. 
McTyeire, presiding. He was 
. ordained Deacon by Bishop 

McTyeire at Kinmundy, Illinois, in 1870; ordained Elder by Bishop Kavanaugh at 
Ashley, Illinois, in 1872. He has served the following charges: Illinois Con- 
ference; London City Circuit, 1869-1870; Patoka Circuit, 1870-1871; Montrose 
Circuit 1871-1872; Waverly, 1872-1873; Shoal Creek Circuit, 1873-1874; Martinsville, 
1874; following this appointment, he evangelized for ten years: Salem, 1886-1887; 
^f ^Jto 1887-1889; Mount Zion and Heyworth, 1889-1891; Murphysborough, 1891- 
Joao' ? T e ,, 0t0 -', 1893 " 1895 ; Centralia, Missouri Conference, 1895-1896; Madison, 1896- 
Hallsville, 1898-1901; Auxvasse, 1901-1904; New Bloomfield, 1904-1906. Ha 
says that more than four thousand souls have been converted under his ministry, a 
large per cent of whom united with the church. He has built under his ministry 
three churches and two parsonages. He attended school at Burksville, Kentucky, and 
Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee. He has been twice married. To Miss 
Kuth Downey in 1873, and to his present wife, Miss Ella Kramer, in 1885. They 
have three children living, Maud Llewellyn, Edna Llewellyn and Frank Llewellyn; 
Carroll C. Llewellyn, Paul Llewellyn and Lela Elizabeth Llewellyn, deceased. He has 
made it a rule to read three new books every year during his ministry. He believes 
strongly in the work of the Christian College as the strongest constructive force in 
maintaining the highest standard of manhood and womanhood. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 



99 




REV WILLIAM CYRUS RICE. 



It is a man's belief in the Immorality of the souls of his fellow- 
Men which prompts the largest sympathies and arouses the most 
Tireless service for their good. — Bishop Hendrix. 



William Cyrus, son of John W and Emily J. Rice, was born near New Ham- 
ton, Harrison County, Missouri, on May 16, 1862. 

Brother Rice was educated as a teacher at the Stanberry Normal College, Stan- 
berry, Mo., and spent several years teaching in Gentry and Harrison Counties. 

In January, 1879, he attended a meeting conducted at a country church in 
Gentry County, about five miles North of McFall, by the Rev. John Eastep of the 
United Brethren. During this meeting Brother Rice became convicted of sin and 
went to the altar where he was converted, receiving a full and definite work of grace. 
He speaks of his subsequent growth in grace in these words: "If I have made prog- 
ress in grace it is along the l>ne of a very da^nite belief in prayer, not only for 
spiritual grace, but for temporal blessings; for instance, asking for and expecting 
guidance in business. 

On August 16, 1885, Brother Rice was married to Miss Priscilla Lucinda Dotson. 
To this union were born five children : Elizabeth Rice, Stella Emily Rice, Wayne 
Rice, William Lewis Rice, and Lucy Ware Rice. 

After his marriage Brother Rice began to contemplate giving up the profession 
of a teacher to enter upon a mercantile career. He planned to open a hardware 
business, with the confident expectation of obtaining a competency that would at once 
secure his own ease and the complete education of his family. About this time, how- 
ever, the great crisis of his life occurred in his call to the ministry, and turning his 
back on the plans he had cherished for his own ease he followed the voice of his great 
Leader. He was licensed to preach in April, 1887, by the Quarterly Conference of 
the Bethany Circuit (now New Hampton Circuit) , Rev. S. B. Tablor being the 
preacher in charge, and Rev. G. J. Warren, Presiding Elder. In July, 1888, the same 
Quarterly Conference recommended bim to the Annual Conference for admission on 
trial, and he was admitted at the session which met in Gallatin the following Septem- 
ber, Bishop Hendrix presiding. 

Brother Rice completed his Conference Course in regular order, was ordained 
Deacon by Bishop Key at Fayette in 1890, and was ordained Elder by Bishop Galloway 
at Montgomery City in 1892. He has served the following charges in the order 
named: Denver, Spring Hill, Ravenwood, Ham's Prairie, Centralia, Wellsville, Aux- 
vasse, Mound City, Elmo, Skidmore, and Hallesville. 

Brother Rice has been successful in the work of the ministry. He has received 
into the church upwards of five hundred persons, has built the Middletown church in 
Montgomery County, the Stedman church in Callaway County, and the Denver par- 
sonage. He has also repaired or rebuilt the churches at Centralia and Skidmore, 
and the Tarkio Chapel in Holt County. 



100 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV HARRY WALTER BREWER. 



Contendite intrare per angustam portavi. 
Strive to enter in at the strait gate. — Jesus. 



Rev. Harry Walter Brewer, son of William Thomas Brewer and Mary Eunice 
Brewster, both of whom were members of the Methodist Church, was born in Douglas 
County, Illinois, June 1st, 1882. He was converted in December, 1898, at Indianola, 
Iowa, under the ministry of Rev. Harris, and then and there joined the First 
Methodist Church. He was forcibly impressed with the thought that if he sought 
first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness, all things else would be added 
unto him, and with this idea in view, he gave himself up to the Lord and. has been 
very happy in His service ever since. His growth in grace has been quite gradual, 
reading God's word, praying and working being a source of great pleasure and satis- 
faction to him. He was licensed to preach in March, 1905, by the Mexico District 
Conference, Rev. R. F. Campbell, of Moberly, Mo., being the preacher in charge, 
and Rev. A. C. Browning, Presiding Elder. He was recommended to the Annual 
Conference for admission on trial, March, 1906, by the Mexico District Conference, 
and was received into the Annual Conference in 1906, Rev. A. C. Browning, Pre- 
siding Elder, and Bishop Key presiding. He has served as assistant pastor at Moberly, 
Mo., and at Rowena Circuit last year and reappointed this year. Seventy-one persons 
have been received into the church during his ministry. A new church at Mt. Zion, 
six miles from Paris, Missouri, at a cost of $2,000.00, has been built under his pas- 
torate. He was graduated from the Indianaola High School and was at Simpson 
College, at Indianola, Iowa, for two years. He was married to Evelyn Esthena 
Hendrix, June 28th, 1906. He says he considers his conversion the most important 
crisis in his life. He has been very greatly helped in his religious life by reading 
Dr. Hillis' books and Dr. Gordon's book. He very strongly endorses the Christian 
College. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 101 



REV ROLLIN 0. TRIPLETT. 



Christianity is the ripe fruit of Christ's inner life. — Bishop 
Tigert. 



Rev. Rollin 0. Triplett was born at Columbia, Kentucky, May 26th, 1879. His 
parents, C. T. Tripplett and M. J. Tripplett, were members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, South. He was converted at Columbia, Kentucky, in the winter of 
1893, and at the same time united with the church. The meeting in which he was 
converted was held by Rev. J. J. Smith, an evangelist; Rev. S. L. C. Coward being 
the pastor. He was licensed to preach by the District Conference of the Columbia 
District, Louisville Conference, June 2nd, 1899; Rev. Jesse L. Murrell, Presiding 
Elder, and Rev. J. S. Kilgore, preacher in charge; was recommended for admission 
on trial into the Annual Conference by the District Conference of the West Plains 
District, St. Louis Conference, May 9th, 1902; was received on trial into the St. 
Louis Conference, September 27th, 1902; Rev. J. C. L. Boehm, Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop A. W Wilson, presiding; ordained Deacon at Stevensville, Montana, August 
28th, 1904, by Bishop H. C. Morrison. He has served in order the following charges: 
Ellington Circuit, 1902, 1903; Belgrade Station, Montana Conference, 1903-1904; Wil- 
bur and Govan charge, East Columbia Conference, 1904-1905; Readville Circuit, Mis- 
souri Conference, 1905-1906. He attended High School at Columbia, Kentucky, and one 
year at Central College, Fayette, Missouri. He was married to Miss Addie L. Alverson, 
April 1st, 1902, and they have one child, Myrtle Triplett. 



102 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




MR. E. T. DINKLE. 



The greatness of a man is his strength in bearing the burd 
Of humanity. — Bishop Hendrix. 



ens 



Mr - E - T. Dinkle, of Tulip, Missouri, was born in Howard County, Missouri, 
February 24th, 1863. His parents, William L. Dinkle, and Mary E. Dinkle, were 
devoted members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and gave to their son 
the advantages of a Christian home. Brother Dinkle was converted and joined the 
Baptist Church near Columbia, Missouri, in 1880. In 1884, he was married to 
Miss Josie E. Maxey, and together they united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, 

nf° U r \ w° r , terS Chape1 ' ln 1886 - Sister Josie Max ^ Dinkle w *s a close student 
of Gods Word as well as a reader of many books, and was indeed a help-meet to 

JL tl n a 7 al fri6nd t0 her pastor - Sister Josi § Dink] e died, March 26th, 
1904. Brother Dinkle is a successful merchant at Tulip, Missouri, and is a loyal 
friend of the church. He is always interested in the welfare of the church. He 
was married July 26th, 1905, to Miss Fannie L. Carter, a woman of splendid Chris- 
tian character. Brother Dinkle and wife are prominent in the religious and social life 
of their community and are highly esteemed by all. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MEXICO DISTRICT. 103 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CENTENNIAL OFFICERS AND SECRETARIES 
OF THE FOREIGN AND HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 



WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY— OFFICERS. 

President. ... .Mrs. G. B. Harrison, Glasgow 

First Vice-President. ... .Mrs. Adam Hendrix, Fayette 

Second Vice-President. .Miss Elizabeth Billingsley, Kansas City 

Corresponding Secretary ... Mrs. Blanche Ramsey, Chillicothe 

Recording Secretary . Mrs. John Holland, Fayette 

Treasurer . Miss Hallie Sosey, Palmyra 

Auditor ... .Mrs. J. A. Smith, Palmyra 

DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Chillicothe. , Chillicothe 

Fayette. .Mrs. E. M. Dearing, Columbia 

Gallatin. .Mrs. J. W. Tanquary, Maysville 

Hannibal. .Mrs. J. A. Lanius, Palmyra 

Macon. .Mrs. A. E. Jones, Shelbina 

Mexico. .Mrs. S. P. Emmons, Mexico 

.flattsburg. .. .Mrs. H. P. Woodson, Richmond 

St. Charles. .Mrs. C. D. Avery, Troy 

St. Joseph. .Mrs. Lucy Miller, Agency 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSION SOCIETY— OFFICERS. 

President. .Mrs. P. L. Vasse, Huntsville 

First Vice-President. ... .Mrs. R. G. Terrill, Moberly 

Second Vice-President . .... Mrs. Potter Gregory, Mexico 

Third Vice-President. ....Mrs. S. P Emmons, Mexico 

Corresponding Secretary .Mrs. M. S. Palmer, Columbia 

Recording Secretary ... .Mrs. C. B. Clapp, Moberly 

Treasurer ... . Mrs. Frank Clark, Lawson 

Superintendent of Literature and Press Work. .Mrs. John Holliday, Carrolton 

DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Chillicothe. .Mrs. John Holliday, Carrollton 

Mexico. .Mrs. W P. Rowland, Mexico 

Fayette. Mrs. J. D. Bowling, Columbia 

Plattsburg. ... .Mrs. James Barthgate, Polo 

Gallatin. ... .Miss Anna Burnes, Albany 

St. Charles. 'To be supplied) 

St. Joseph. .Mrs. J. B. Davis, St. Joseph 

Hannibal. ... .Mrs. Paul W Floweree, New London 



104 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE. 




REV. HORACE BROWN. 



1 806-CENTENNI AL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 



FAYETTE DISTRICT. 

Presiding Elder, B. D. Sipple. 



Fayette Station. . S. H. C. Burgin 

Supernumerary, H. P Bond 
Columbia Station. C. M. Bishop 

Huntsville Station. .A. B. Culbertson 

Clifton Hill Station. . . .W. Wynn 

Supernumerary, R. M. Dameron 
Salisbury and Asbury .H. H. Johnson 
Prairie Hill Circuit. 



Keytesville Station. 
Dalton Circuit. 
Glasgow Station. 
Armstrong Station. 
Roanoke Circuit. 
Fayette Circuit. 



To be supplied 

• O. H. Phillips 

• J. A. Hughes 
R. M. Hardaway 

• H. E. Draper 

• E. C. Morgan 
M. Williams 



Higbee Circuit. 
New Franklin Station . 
Clark and Cooper 
Rocheport Circuit. 
Columbia Circuit. 



.D. F. Bone 

.L. C. Maggart 

N. F. Matthews 

,E. L. Rutledge 

.F. E. Moseley 

To be supplied 



S. 



Ashland Circuit. 

President Central College— J. C. Morris 
Secretary Central College — W. Carlisle 
President Howard-Payne College — H. E. 

Stout 

Conference Secretary of Education — 

A. B. Culbertson 

Conference Secretary Board of Missions 

— C. M. Bishop 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



105 



REV BOWMAN DEWEASE SIPPLE. 



Our life, whilst Thou preserv'st that life, 

Thy sacrifice shall be; 
And death, when death shall be our lot, 

Shall join our souls to Thee. — Joseph Addison. 



By Rev. A. B. Culbertson, A. M 
Rev. Bowman Dewease Sipple 
was born in Douglas County, 
Illinois, February 27th, 1869. 
His father was a Local Elder in 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, Rev. William Harrison 
Sipple. His mother, Elizabeth 
Brown Medley, was the daugh- 
ter of Rev. Joseph Medley of 
the Virginia Conference. Dis- 
tinct religious impressions with 
him date as early as the eighth 
year. As this time the practice 
of daily private prayer began, 
and also his call to the holy min- 
istry was felt. Around the fam- 
ily altar he first received the 
kindlings of divine love in 
his soul. He was brought 
to a public decision for Christ 
under the preaching of Rev. 
George W Penn, and joined the 
old Pleasant Grove church in 
Callaway County, January the 
8th, 1874. After this he con- 
tinued to seek and obtained the 
witness of God's Spirit to the 
fact that he was born of God. 
His call to the ministry meant 
to him first of all a preparation 
for this sacred work, and ac- 
cordingly he was knocking at 
the door of Central College in 
the year 1870. Four and one- 
half years were spent in this 
institution where he was faith- 
ful as a student and exercised 
a wholesome influence over the 
students with whom he came in 
contact. He considers his entrance to Central College a crisis in his life, and has 
ever been a staunch friend of the institution, never tiring in his efforts to promote 
the interests of his Alma Mater. He was licensed to preach by the Quarterly Con- 
ference of the Pleasant Grove Circuit, August 4th, 1883. The Quarterly Conference 
of this Circuit recommended him to the Annual Conference for admission on trial, 
August, 1886, and he was received the following September, Bishop Holland N. 
McTyeire, presiding. Bishop Eugene R. Hendrix ordained him Deacon at Mexico, 
Missouri, September the 11th, 1887, and September the 15th, 1889, Bishop John C. 
Granberry, at Palmyra, ordained him Elder. He received his first appointment in 
1885, and has served the following charges in the order named: Laddonia Circuit, 
one year; Humphreys Circuit, three years; Centralia Circuit, one year; Wellsville 
Circuit, three years; Ham's Prairie Circuit, two years; Mexico Circuit; two years; 
Montgomery Station, thre years; Huntsville Station, three years; and Presiding Elder 
of the Fayette District from September 1904 till the present time, 1907. He has 
received into the church six hundred and seventy-four members; Humphreys and 
Judson churches, on Humphreys' Mission, were built under his pastorate, and other 
important repairs on churches and parsonages h^ve been made. A debt of $2,000.00 
on the church at Huntsville was cancelled during his pastorate. 

His marriage to Miss Hattie Bratton, August 4th. 1888, was a happy and for- 
tunate one. God has blessed them with two daughters — Leah Augusta and Mary 
Elizabeth. His opinion of the Christian College as a .eener^l proposition is that 
the Christian College is the only institution that can develop the entire man. 




106 



CENTENNIAL VOLUM E OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. WILLIAM MARION RUSH, D. D. 

The night of Time will be forgotten in the brightness of 
Eternal Day.— Dr. Joseph Parker. 



filled 

ments 

1842, 



By Rev. B. D. Sipple. 

Rev. William Marion Rush 
was born in Marion County, Mis- 
souri about the year 1821. He 
was converted in his room, July 
6th, 1838, at 8 p. m., joined the 
Church at Moriah Campground, 
Lewis County, Missouri, August 
4th, 1838 ; was licensed to preach 
September 21st, 1841, at Fox 
River Campground, Clark Coun- 
ty, Missouri, by Rev. William 
Patton; was received on trial in 
the Missouri Conference at Pal- 
myra, October, 1841, together 
with E. M. Marvin and thirteen 
others; ordained Deacon in 1843, 
Elder in 1845. Brother Rush 
the following appoint- 
1841, Adair Circuit; 
_ _ Merimac Circuit; 1843, 
South St. Louis; 1844, Platts- 
burg Circuit; 1845, Columbia 
and Rocheport; 1846, Palmyra; 
1847, Weston; 1848-9, St. Joseph 
Station; 1850, Louisiana; 1851, 
Hannibal; 1852, Shelbyville; 
1853-4, Glasgow; 1855, Rich- 
mond; 1856-9, Brunswick Dis- 
trict; 1860-61, St. Joseph Sta- 
tion. During the war he labored 
in St. Louis by permission of his 
Conference, 1863-4. In 1865 he 
went to Plattsburg; 1866-68, St. 
Joseph District; 1869 to 1873 he 
was agent for Central College; 
1874-75, Fayette Circuit; 1876- 
79, Fayette District— thus for 
eleven years he spent himself for 
Central College and the interests closest allied with education. In 1880 affliction 
kept him in the supernumerary relation; 1881-82, Rocheport; 1883, Hannibal Dis- 
trict; 1884, supernumerary, and in 1885 supernumerated. He died at his home in 
Booneville, Mo., June 12, 1886. His first wife was Miss Olivia, daughter of the late 
Hon. James H. Birch, of Clinton, County, Missouri; his second wife was Mrs. Nelson 
of Booneville. Bishop Hendrix preached the funeral sermon, and the remains were 
buried in Plattsburg, Missouri. 

Mr. Rush was considered the greatest debater in the Missouri Conference. He had 
a striking personality, solid as a rock, and a mind that thought along logical lines. 
In the confusion of debates by all classes of speakers, it was a relief to have a master 
of argument to take the floor and clear up the fallacies and misconceptions in the 
discussion. Five times he went to the General Conference, four times as leader of 
his delegation, and received a number of votes for the Episcopacy. He was hon- 
ored with the degree of Doctor of Divinity, and was for many years a Curator of 
Central College. He excelled in the elements of personal Christian character; was 
kind, true, exemplary in the relations of husband, father, and friend; a strong 
preacher, an able writer, as his little volume on Baptism well attests, when he 
demolished the arguments of his opponent, an able defender of the faith as taught 
by the Methodist Church. During his years as pastor, Presiding Elder and Agent for 
the College at Fayette, he visited the rooms of the students, and brightened their 
lives, and helped the homesick, and encouraged the boys struggling for an education. 
His rare gifts were used for the glory of the Lord. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



107 



REV. WILLIAM GOFF CAPLES. 



For contemplation he and valor formed. — Milton. 



By Rev. Chas. B. Duncan, A. M. 

Few men, if any, have made 

a larger place for themselves in 

the history of Missouri Meth- 
odism than W. G. Caples. He 

was born at Jeromeville, Ohio, 

April 23, 1819; was the son of 

Robert F. and Charlotte Caples; 

was converted and joined the 

Church in 1835 ; studied law 

for two years; was appointed 

class leader in 1836; the fol- 
lowing year was licensed an ex- 

horter; and two years later, hav- 
ing moved to Westport, Missouri, 

was received on trial into the 

Missouri Conference. For a 

quarter of a century, save for 

two short periods when he had 

located on account of debt and 

while he was chaplain in the 

Confederate army, he belonged 

to the itinerant ranks of that 

body. 

His appointments were as fol- 
lows: Plattsburg Circuit, one 

year; Weston Circuit, one year; 

Keytesville Circuit, two years; 

Huntsville Circuit, two years; 

Glasgow Station, two years; 

Brunswick Station, two years; 

Hannibal Station, two years; 

Weston District, four years; 

Weston Station and High School, 

one year; Agent for Central Col- 
lege, two years ; Fayette District, 

one year; Brunswick District, 

three years ; Glasgow Station, one vear. 

Early in life he was married to" Miss Charlotte Gist, daughter of General George 

W. Gist, of Maryland. She died in 1848 and he was afterward married to Mrs. 
Bayley, of Brunswick, Missouri. 

He was a man of high social qualities, communicative, entertaining and instruc- 
tive. He was likewise a man of rare force of character, intellectual power, and purity 
of heart. On the Conference floor and in the deliberations of the body he was a 
leading spirit. To all the great interests of the church he was keenly alive, entertain- 
ing broad ideas of her work and enlarged views of the plans and means of her suc- 
cess. The esteem in which he was held by his brethren is shown by his election, in 
the absence of the Bishop, to preside over the Conference of 1861. He was a strong 
advocate of Christian Education. While on the Weston District he established a 
High School at Weston and another at Plattsburg. He planned and pleaded for a 
system of schools co-extensive with the State. His plan embraced one College to 
become in time, as our resources developed, a university, and a secondary school for 
each Presiding Elder's District to be a feeder for the great Central College, but 
he saw the passing away of his own secondary schools. Two years of his life were 
spent in raising an endowment for Central College at Fayette, Missouri. His work 
for Central College is for all time. 

In the pulpit he had scarcely an equal, and no superior, in the State. As a 
preacher he was earnest, his doctrine was sound, his illustrations striking, his argu- 
ments strong and convincing. His power over an audience was marvelous and often 
the slain of the Lord were many. 

At Glasgow, Missouri, October 18, 1864, at the zenith of his power he was mor- 
tally wounded by a shell from a Confederate battery. Four days later he uttered 
his final words of victory on earth : "0 ! what am I gaining, gaining, gaming, and 
fell on asleep. He is buried at Brunswick, Missouri. 

One of his sons, Hon. R. B. Caples, a lawyer of ability and integrity, lives in 
Glasgow, Missouri. 




10K 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



' " - 1 





REV SAMUEL H. C. BURGIN. 



Go, speed the stars of Thought on to their shining goals. — 
Emerson. 



Rev. Samuel H. C. Burgin, son of Henry S. Burgin, was born September 7th, 
1871, at Lorraine, Harrison County, Missouri. Both parents were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted January 10th, 1882, at Lor- 
raine, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. S. S. Hardin, and joined the church at 
the same time, when only six years old. His conversion was very clear and satisfac- 
tory. He was licensed to preach May 28, 1897, by the Kansas City District, South- 
west Missouri Conference; Rev. C. M. Hawkins, D. D., preacher in charge, and Rev. 
W. T. McClure, Presiding Elder. The Central Church, Kansas City, Quarterly Con- 
ference recommended him to the Kansas City District Conference by which he was 
recommended to the Southwest Missouri Annual Conference, May 28th, 1897; and he 
was received into the Annual Conference on trial in 1897; Rev. W T. McClure, Pre- 
siding Elder, and Bishop 0. P. Fitzgerald, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by 
Bishop John C. Granbery, September 24th, 1899, at Neosho, Missouri; ordained Elder 
by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, September 18th, 1904, at Springfield, Missouri. Appoint- 
ments filled are: Kansas City, Campbell St. and Garland Avenue, one year; Camp- 
bell Street, Kansas City, Missouri, two years; Butte, Montana, St. Paul Church, two 
years; Windsor, Missouri, two years; Fayette, Missouri, Centenary Chapel, now serv- 
ing his third year. During his ministry eight hundred and forty members have been 
added to the church. His education was obtained at Woodland College at Independence, 
Missouri, and at Central College at Fayette, Missouri. He was married to Miss 
Lora E. Miller, October 18th, 1899, and has one child, Herschel Steele Burgin. When 
engaged in business in Kansas City, Missouri, he was called from above to preach 
the Gospel, but hesitated for more than three years before making the decision that 
placed him in the ministry; this he considers the most important crisis in his life. 
Shakespeare's works, Pilgrim's Progress, and Imitation of Christ are some of the 
books which have helped him most. In his estimation the importance of the Christian 
College cannot be over-estimated. Brother Burgin is a Christian gentleman, a good 
pastor, and a fine preacher. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



109 



MR. ARTHUR FERDINAND DAVIS. 



As from the darkening gloom a silver dove 
Upsoars, and darts into the eastern light, 
On pinions that nought moves but pure delight, 
So fled thy soul into the realms above. — Keats. 

By Prof. Wm. A. Webb, A. M. 

Arthur Ferdinand Davis 
was born in Ralls County, 
Missouri, March 29, 1842, and 
died in Fayette, Missouri, 
January 4, 1907. He grew 
to manhood among the whole- 
some influences of a Christ- 
ian home; his parents, Tem- 
ple Harold Davis and Frances 
Hendren, being members of 
the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. Entering 
Central College in 1858, he 
applied himself diligently 
and successfully to his studies 
and became a leader among 
his companions in all things 
that pertained to the literary 
and social advancement of the 
student body. It was during 
this period that in company 
with his classmate and future 

brother-in-law, Eugene R. 

Hendrix, he united with the 

church. 

At the close of the second 

year he was compelled to 

leave college on account of 

ill health, and entered upon 

the active business career 

which he followed until his 

death. In 1869, he was mar- 
ried to Miss Sallie Cockran. 

She died, however, within a 

year, and in order to shake 

off the gloom of this bereave- 
ment and to gratify his taste 

for study and travel he spent 

the next year in an exten- 
sive tour around the world. 

From this trip he brought 

back not only a portfolio filled 

with reproductions of the 

most famous pictures of che 

ol -''-world galleries, but a 

mind stored with charming 

reminiscences and delightful 

memories. Fortunate indeed 

was the guest or friend who 

was permitted to enjoy an evening of conversation in his company. VoW . 

He was married on June 22nd, 1875, to Miss Mary Belle Hendr ix of 1 ayette 
Missouri. The following year he removed to Fayette, and from that time on h is 

life was intimately identified with the intellectual, social, and religious life ot tins 

community. To this union were born two children Arthur Forman and Murray 
Hendrix. The death of his son Arthur at the age of five years Profoundly affected 

his life by deepening and intensifying his religious nature As a , memo ™.°\^ 
son he established in Central College a few years later "The Arthur Davis i Loan 
Fund" of $5,000.00 to be used in helping worthy young men of h ™ te " ™ans m 
securing a college education. This benefaction was of a piece with many ^ no Die 
contributions both of time and money to the College of which he was Curator and 
Treasurer for almost a quarter of a century. 





tv 

Hi 



,«.vm 



\ 



:,:>H 






T3 w 

<D 43 
in 
in 
<& +j 

^ 2 

^ 0) 



g2 

« o3 



0). 








U-p to 

<u £ «* 

c* ° 2 

^5 -^ ft 

-m to ^ 

to ft 3 
O 

s ^ 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



Ill 



REV. CHARLES McTYEIRE BISHOP, D. D. 

Mist may rest upon the surrounding landscape, but our own 
Path is visible from hour to hour, from day to day. 

— William E. Gladstone. 

By Rev. George M. Gibson, A. M. 
On February 2nd, 1862, in 

Ash County, North Carolina, 

there was born to the Rev. E. 

W. S. Bishop and his wife, Julia, 

their first son, whom they named 

Charles McTyeire. The father 

was a highly cultivated and most 

useful man, for thirty-five 

years a member of Holston Con- 
ference, Methodist Episcopal 

Church, South. The grand- 
father was also a Methodist 

preacher, teacher and college 

president. Thus the subject of 

this sketch began life with "a 

goodly heritage." 

Converted in early childhood, 

he joined the Church in 1873, 

under the ministry of Dr. D. W. 

Carter, now of Mexico. 

In 1884 he graduated from 

Emory and Henry College, in 

which institution he was adjunct 

professor of Latin and Greek 

during 1886-1887. In 1887 he 

joined Holston Conference and 

was sent to Ashville, North 

Carolina, where he remained 

two years. On June 3rd, 1889, 

he was married to Miss Phoebe 

Eleanor Jones of Ashville, a 

woman whose culture and beau- 
tiful character pre-eminently 

fitted her for being the help- 
meet of such a man as Bishop. 
In 1889 he was transferred to 
the Southwest Missouri Confer- 
ence and stationed at Melrose 

Church, Kansas City, where he remained four years. From here he went to Lexing- 
ton for two years; Brooklyn avenue, Kansas City, one year; Melrose again, for two 
years; Nevada, three years. In 1901 he was transferred to the Missouri Conference 
and stationed at Francis Street Church, St. Joseph, where he remained four years. 
From St. Joseph he went to Columbia, where he is still pastor. 

While in St. Joseph Dr. Bishop visited the principal cities of the Eastern States, 
studying modern church buildings, and as a result suggested to the architect all the 
main features of the splendid new Francis Street Church, St. Joseph, Missouri. In 
the summer of 1900 he traveled in Europe. 

The honors that have been conferred on Dr. Bishop by his Church indicate the 
strength of the man as well as the esteem of his brethren. The honorary degree of 
D.D. was conferred by Central College in 1899; he was a member of the Inter-church 
Conference on Federation, New York, in 1905; member of the General Conference in 
1906, by which body he was made a member of the General Board of Missions, and 
also a member of the Commission on Unification of Women's Missionary Societies; 
he has been president of the Preachers' Institute of the Missouri and Southwest Mis- 
souri Conference from its beginning; has been lecturer on the Poetical Books of the 
Bible at the Scarritt Bible and Training School, at the Missionary Training Institute 
of Nashville, Tennessee, and at the Summer School of Theology at the Southwestern 
University of Texas. He is at present writer of the "Senior" and "Intermediate Quar- 
terlies" of the Sunday School literature of our Church. 

Dr. Bishop is a man of scholarly attainments, with splendidly disciplined mind. 
On the platform and in the pulpit he is a man of superior effectiveness. His preaching 
is characterized by spiritual insight, incissive utterance, luminous presentation of 
truth, and over it all there is the glow of a refined imagination which charms while 
it impresses. 




112 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. WILLIAM HENRY LEWIS, D.D. 



The distinction of the path of the just is that more and more 
Light shines upon it. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



By Rev. A. B. Culbertson, A.M. 

Rev. William Henry Lewis, 
now one of our oldest and hon- 
ored superannuates, is in his 
ninety-third year, having been 
born in the state of Virginia, 
March, 1815. Pious parentage 
was his inheritance. His father 
and mother knew their sins for- 
given. For more than three- 
quarters of a century the son 
has been able to say, "I know 
that my Redeemer liveth." His 
conviction for sin was pungent, 
his conversion clear, and his 
soul was made unspeakably 
happy. He believes in full and 
complete salvation, and has en- 
joyed it at times through his 
long Christian life. During the 
• war his license and ordination 
papers were destroyed, hence 
data concerning them has not 
been furnished. His appoint- 
ments, beginning with the fall 
of 1843, have been Keytsville, 
one year; Jefferson City, two 
years. During these years at 
Jefferson City a revival of 
marked power was held. The 
entire city and surrounding 
country came under its influence 
and felt its power. Three hun- 
dred and fifty persons professed 
faith in Christ, among the num- 
ber were twenty-one members 
of the Missouri Legislature. A 
prominent business man, after 
vniiori /Mif ~„a ~, *.- j • . ,i his conversion in this meeting, 

as h >Z \??«\ P f mt0 . ^e streets seven barrels of whisky and brandy, exclaiming 
2 1% l am done with this traffic." He has held many other meetings of great 
cZhl JIZ T n £ ^T rgGS a ? d a f lstin g his brethren of the ministry. From Jefferson 
vars-t»StWf i U1S ° r f ° Ur years; Boon ville, two years; Independence, two 
Sw^i! 7 6 VG l ears; Was in char S e of Howard-Payne College during the 
thl reSi'r m tZ^l teachm Z £ Wes ton and other places. After going back into 
ton three v^tS & W *? at Plattsbur S> one year; Richmond, two years; Carroll- 
Mrat Jomerv Pit J E ' J^V Colum bia, three years; Louisiana, one year; 

fof™r y (ht!l r ye . a ^ Wh t re he had most ^rked success; then at St. Charles 
viUe thr"ee vear R ^ ?r hlS ,l har p, two yearS ° nce before) ; OTallon and Wentz- 
dutv towkflLp/ thls t™ e the shadows were lengthening so that he deemed it his 
ins this his W P »™ nnu f ted / ela tlon to his conference. A^parsonage was built dur- 
Sed to tv the ffi t men > g 1 . 8 f ducation , received at Randolph-Macon College, 
thefoss of his bosoT^± 0n f ° r th g. lo *g and useful career. Thrice he has suffered 
he was married Ju£ 2 q7iS' ^ S first wife was Miss Christian Byrd, to whom 
B Lucv B C T A I w t? 6 't T £ e n T ames of the children of this wife are: Henry 
the second time to M^'a ^^^ h B " M ' E " Sallie and L B - He was married 
are his child™ bv fh \l w^T'r?' ^°?£ ington ' A P ril 18th > 1869 ' E ' H - and Everett 
Susan SavaJe S ?hf^LS 1,°? lhe 9th ° f November - 1881, he was married to Mrs. 

and usefu??areer To \t \t ^ w th the WOrds ofone who has had such a wide 
fgnored bv either .hllt th .°^«ul they will mean much. "The Bible neglected or 

people and I would wL / + ' 1S a T en / ce to the interests and safety of the 
Stain and strenither? ^Tr^ ™ ord ° f c ™™^ to our Methodism of Missouri. 
reverenced » stlengthen the Christian Colic-, whe re the word of God is taught and 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



113 



REV WILLIAM FRANKLIN BELL. 



To be pure in heart is the true glory of intelligent life. — Bishop 
Marvin. 



By Rev. A. B. Culbertson* A.M. 



Rev. William Franklin Bell, 
the son of John W- and Eliza- 
beth C. Bell, who were both 
members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, was born 
February 16th, 1881, in Old 
Franklin, Howard County. He 
was converted at a camp meet- 
ing held near Old Bloomington 
by Rev. Reuben Aldridge and 
Rev. Jesse Green. From a child 
he felt a call to the holy minis- 
try, and fifty years of faithful 
response to that call has been 
the joy of his life. The Bloom- 
ington Quarterly Conference li- 
censed him to preach in 1850, 
and recommended him to the 
Missouri Annual Conference for 
admission on trial, September, 
1851, and during the same 
month by the Annual Conference 
in session at Fayette, with Wil- 
liam Capers as Bishop, he was 
admitted. He received his Dea- 
con's orders in 1853, and Elder's 
orders in 1855. 

He has served the following 
charges: Fulton Circuit, Mary- 
ville Circuit, Oregon Circuit, 
Chillicothe Circuit, Carrollton 
Circuit, Athens Circuit, Savan- 
nah Circuit, Lancaster Circuit, 
New Franklin Circuit, Columbia 
Circuit, Bucklin Circuit, Paris 
Circuit, Fayette Circuit, Sharps- 
burg Circuit, Paris Circuit, Shel- 

bina Circuit, Bloomington Cir- , -,.■,•_„. -RVanV 

cuit, Kirksville Circuit? Sue City Circuit New Florence Circurt Roanoak New Frank 
lin, St. Charles District, Keytsville and Salisbury Circuit, Fayette Par is , * i anklin 
and Higbee Stations. Two good church houses were > built under his 'Pastorates .He 
has been married twice. First, August 2nd, 1854, to Miss Martha L. ^y ""^ cond 
to Miss Sarah D. Ridgeway. The names of his children are: John B., Anna Belle 
Stapleton, William Caples, Marvin Payne and Ada. wam u oy . OY( , pnt t?pv W 

He has been in the conference the longest of a ny living member «c ^ «<£ ^ 
H. Lewis, D.D. This long ministry has been richly b essed both™ the alvataon ot 
the unsaved and building up of the believers Probably as ™^ny as fifteen hundred 
souls have professed faith in Christ under his preaching. He knows the JKethodwt 
doctrines, believes in them with all his soul and preaches them with c £«™^*™ 
power. His wise and conservative counsel is highly imzed and so ^ by "is brethren. 
Hear his word on the Christian College: "It is all important to ^^f^^S 
if we desire them to carry out the mission God ordained them to accomplish m tne 
salvation of the world." 




114 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSO URI METHODISM . 




REV HIRAM D. GROVES, D.D. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 115 



NOT DEAD— NOT LOST— NOT FAR. 



The following was written by T. Berry Smith in memory 

of the late Dr. Hiram D. Groves, President of 

Howard-Payne College, in Fayette. 

Not dead! 

No! no! not dead, just laid away from sight 

To slumber undisturbed through one long night 

Instead of many brief ones such as fall 

In swift recurrence o'er us one and all. 

If thou art glad to lay thy weary head 

Upon the pillow of thy nightly bed, 

And lose thyself in slumber, wherefore weep 

When loved ones rest in nature's dreamless sleep? 

Since now we wake when night has passed away 

In the old likeness of the former day, 

May we not hope to see them face to face 

Who in the churchyard have their resting place? 

Believe the Master, o'er and o'er He said — 

"Why weepest thou? Only asleep — 

Not dead — not dead!" 

Not lost! 

No ! no ! not lost, just parted for a day 
While we make journey on the homeward way. 
When shades of evening fall and with desire 
We seek our own at every friendly fire 
And find them not, then 'neath night's diadem 
Turning our faces toward Jerusalem 
And thither coming, by and by we'll find 
The ones whom yesterday we left behind — 
Not on the streets by passing scenes beguiled 
Where Mary, mourning, sought her missing child, 
But in the Father's house and His employ 
Where Mary found at last her precious boy. 
There in the midst of God's sanhedral host 
We'll hear : "Why sought ye me? I was 

Not lost— not lost!" 

Not far! 

No! no! not far, just hidden from our eyes 
Which wide would open with a glad surprise 
Could we but for one moment have the power 
Elisha's servant had on Dothan's tower, 
To see how near us are the hosts unseen 
Guarding our lives, whose bucklers held between 
Serve day and night to foil the quivering darts 
A wanton world flings at our aching hearts. 
Our eyes are holden and we cannot see 
How near our loved ones in the shadows be; 
Thro' cloudless days and days without a star 
Close by our sides like sentinels they stand 
Keeping the promise of the last command : 
"Lo! I am with you always" — near — 

Not far — not far. 

Fayette, Mo. 1906. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



117 




REV HENRY ELBERT STOUT, A.M. 



Science and Faith must ever be united; they are the two wings 
Whereby alone we can soar to the knowledge of God. — Canon 
Farrar. 



Rev. Henry Elbert Stout was born in Carroll County, Missouri, near Bosworth, 
November 12th, 1873. His father was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, and his mother was a Scotch Presbyterian, but for a number of years she had 
been a member of the Methodist Church, and died in that faith. He was converted 
when about twelve years old in Northern Nebraska, and jointed the Church in June, 
1890, under the ministry of Rev. H. L. Davis. His was a conversion in childhood; 
having had a mother who knew God, he became acquainted with Him early in life, and 
hence the transition was not great. From a child he felt the call to preach the un- 
searchable riches of Christ, so he obeyed and found the "hidden gold." He was licensed 
to preach by the Fayette District Conference in the spring of 1898; Dr. T. E. Sharp, 
preacher in charge, and Rev. J. R. A. Vaughan, Presiding Elder. He was recom- 
mended to the Annual Conference for admission on trial by the Macon District Con- 
ference held at Paris, Missouri, April 19th, 1901; received into the Annual Conference 
on trial at St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1901; Rev. J. A. Mumpower, Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop Candler, presiding. Ordained Deacon by Bishop Galloway at Mexico. Missouri, 
September 6th, 1903. He has served the following charges. Clark Circuit, Mexico 
District, 1901-1902; Centralia Station, 1902-1906; President of Howard-Payne College, 
1906. About two hundred persons have been received into the Church under his 
ministry. He attended High School in Northern Nebraska, and Central College, 
Fayette, Missouri, from which he was graduated in 1901. He was married to Miss 
Genelle Cunningham, November 5th, 1902, and they have one boy, Sidney Elbert 
Stout. He thinks the time when God spoke to him through His spirit, saying: "Follow 
me," and immediately after his graduation when he was tempted to turn his back upon 
his chosen life work, were the greatest crises of his life, but with God's help victory 
was his. Besides the Bible, he has been greatly helped by the reading of McLaren's 
books, "In An Upper Room," Henry Van Dyke's short stories, and his Gospel for a 
World of Sin, and the biographies of our great men, Luther, Wesley, Knox, Carey, etc. 



lis 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV MOSES UPSHARD PAYNE. 



For Love hath no measure in his magnanimities.— Sir Edwin 
Arnold. 

Rev. Moses Upshard Payne 
was born in Woodford County, 
Kentucky, near Versailles, Octo- 
ber 25th, 1807, and died at his 
home, near Payne, Iowa, August 
9th, 1895. In his boyhood he 
was intimately acquainted with 
Thomas F. Marshall and John 
J. Crittenden, natives of the 
same neighborhood and boys to- 
gether. Mr. Payne early learned 
the trade of cotton spinning, and 
followed the occupation for some 
years in his native county and 
later at Maysville, Kentucky. 
He spent a considerable part of 
his middle life in New Orleans, 
where, by industry and economy, 
he became a prosperous and in- 
fluential factor in the cotton 
business of the South. In the 
midst of his New Orleans busi- 
ness he foresaw the Civil War 
impending, and before the crisis 
came, he disposed of most of his 
property there, and invested in 
unimproved land in the great 
Northwest. Mr. Payne was 
twice married. His first mar- 
riage was to Miss Mary D. 
White. Of this marriage three 
children were born. One, Jacob 
A. Payne, is still living. In Sep- 
tember, 1867, he was marrried to 
Miss Sarah H. Patton, of How- 
ard County, Missouri. Of this 
marriage two children were 
born, both living. The elder is 
Sarah Martha, who is the wife of Rev. S. P Cresap, of the Missouri Conference. The 
other is Moses Miller Payne, a successful farmer and business man, living near Payne, 
Iowa. Mr. Payne was considered by all who knew him as an extraordinary man. Of 
strong personality, large mental endowments, great capacity for work and splendid 
business instinct, he was at the same time a man of invariable integrity, large- 
hearted benevolence, and a Christian gentleman. He was converted at seventeen 
and joined the Methodist Church. At twenty-one he was licensed to preach. He had 
great insight into the truths of the Bible. He was practical, sincere and earnest 
in his preaching. His words carried peculiar force with them, because back of them 
was a life of faith and consistent living. He gave without stint and cheerfully, when 
convinced of a need. He listened with patience and interest to every appeal; he was 
anxious to know needs; he sought opportunities where he could place his money 
wisely. He aided very materially in laying the foundation of Methodism all over 
North Missouri, Southwest Iowa, Eastern Nebraska and the great Northwest. He 
purchased Howard-Payne College and gave it to the Missouri Conference. Central 
College was also the recipient of large gifts. He gave Paine Institute $25,000 and a 
like amount to the Church Extension Board. He sympathized with all bodies and 
parties having as their definite purpose the destruction and prohibition of the liquor 
traffic. He frequently contributed to their funds. All in all, Moses U. Payne's long 
life was eminently useful and certainly successful. Drawing near the end of this 
life's scenes there was perfect composure and beautiful peace. No clouds begloomed; 
no remorse disturbed. The close was like the setting of the sun. He left the darkness 
here; the light of the Eternal Morning was upon his face; gladly he went out with 
his Pilot into the unending day. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



119 



REV BENJAMIN FRANKLIN JOHNSON, M. D. 



To that Jerusalem above with singing I repair. — Charles Wesley. 



By Rev. John Anderson, D.D. 

Rev. Benjamin Franklin John- 
son, M.D., son of William and 
Nancy Johnson, was born in 
Norfolk, Virginia, February 
14th, 1822. At the age of eight 
years he came with his family 
to Missouri. When he was fif- 
teen he made a profession of re- 
ligion, and was an earnest, ex- 
emplary Christian and exerted a 
wide influence for good during 
his early manhood. He attend- 
ed the Academy at Danville, 
Missouri, and was graduated 
from the Missouri Medical Col- 
lege, St. Louis, in 1848. Dr. 
Johnson felt the call to preach 
the gospel, but shrank from the 
great work, feeling he was not 
equal to it, and that he might 
be useful and happy and do 
great good in the practice of 
medicine. He realized in later 
life that he had erred and that 
he should have responded to the 
call to preach instead of study- 
ing medicine. 

In May, 1847, he and Miss 
Catherine Wheeler were married 
at Danville, Missouri. During 
the six years following he at- 
tained to a large and remunera- 
tive practice, and no man ever 
had fairer prospects for distinc- 
tion in his profession, and the 
accumulation of wealth than Dr. 
Johnson gave up when, in Feb- 
ruary, 1854, he applied for li- _,. ., , -, ,, .,, 
cense to preach at the Quarterly Conference of Warrenton Circuit, at Marttasville, 
Rev. E. M. Marvin, Presiding Elder. He was admitted on trial into the Missouri 
Conference in 1855. His ministry was distinguished by its simplicity and earnest- 
ness, and he was successful in winning many to the Christian life He ma de no 
pretension to learned or ornate sermonizing, nor did he boast of what ; he _ had given 
up to preach the gospel, but as a wise masterbuilder he labored diligently to establish 
the Kingdom of his Lord. His strong common sense and sound business methods 
enabled him to render a notable service to the Church in getting the colleges under 
way just after the war. He was the chief instrument in raising the money, Jl,^" 
(a large sum for that time), to put what is now the old academy building occupied 
by Federal troops during the war, in repair so that school might begin in l 1866 .And 
later, when Howard College had been sold and was entirely out of the hand oi 
the Church, a debt which was upon the property at the beginning of the war ^ being 
the cause of the alienation of this valuable property from the church; Dr. Johnson 
went to Rev. M. U. Payne, of Rocheport, and presented the matter to him and 
returned, after the two had considered its importance together and prayed during the 
night for guidance, with Brother Payne's check for about $9,000, the amount required 
to satisfy the claims of those who then held title to the property. 

He was a member of the Board of Curators of Howard Payne College for about 
twenty years, and was the chairman of the Board for several years of that time ana 
served also as financial agent for both Howard-Payne and Central Colleges In 1S»U he 
was granted the superannuated relation at his own request and September I4tn, ie»*, 
he entered into rest, passing away at his beautiful home at Ya ^ ett ^ Anderson 




120 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV EZRA BRECKENRIDGE CROOKS, A. M. 
MRS. MARY E. GROVES CROOKS, A.M. 



But all that is, and has been, and shall be, is just completing 
Our character, adding finishing touches to our symmetry. — Dr. 
F B. Meyer. 

The above came of Methodist stock of several generations standing and were both 
born in the homes of Methodist itinerants. 

Ezra B. Crooks entered life in Hickman County, Kentucky, October 6th, 1874. At 
thirteen he was converted in an old-fashioned camp meeting and entered our Church 
in Waverly, Illinois. In 1894 he entered Central Academy, and in 1899 Central College 
honored him with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He was licensed to preach by the 
Rushville District Conference, June 17th, 1897, Rev. O. T. Rogers being his pastor, 
and his father Presiding Elder of the district. He was admitted on trial the following 
fall into the Illinois Annual Conference. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Oscar P 
Fitzgerald, in 1899, and entered the Theological Department of Vanderbilt University. 
He was graduated as Master of Arts from that University in 1901 ; was transferred to 
the St. Louis Conference and appointed to the Manchester and Fenton Circuit. Before 
the succeeding Annual Conference he was accepted by the Board of Foreign Missions 
and appointed to work in Granbery College, Juiz de Fora, Brazil. After eight months' 
study of the language, he was admitted into full connection in the Brazil Mission 
Conference and ordained Elder by Bishop Alpheus W. Wilson, and appointed pastor 
of the Piracicaba and the Capivary Circuits; next year he was made Presiding Elder 
of the Sao Paulo District, which he served for two years, until his return to America, 
in September, 1906. 

Mary E. G. Crooks, daughter of Rev. Hiram D. Groves and Mrs. Anna Bratton 
Groves, was born September 26th, 1876. Hers was a jovous and protected girlhood, 
passed principally within the precincts of Howard-Payne College. By this noble insti- 
tution she was repeatedly honored, being graduated from the School of Art in 1895; 
from the School of Vocal Music in 1897; and given the degree of Mistress of Arts in 
1900. She joined the Church when five years of age. September 10th, 1902, she 
accepted the life and work of Rev. E. B. Crooks and went as a Missionary to Brazil. 
She was greatly beloved in the Mission and especially so by the Brazilian converts. 
If her heart ever grew faint with longing for home and native land, this was never 
expressed either by word or look to her husband. The hardships and loneliness of the 
little home were all hers, yet others knew not of her burdens. On May 5th, 1906, she 
quietly left this life after a few hours of illness, during which there was no return 
to consciousness and no farewells said. She left a little girl and a baby boy to the 
bewildered care of their father, and now her body sleeps in the Protestant burying 
ground in Sao Paulo, Brazil. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



121 




REV WILLIAM A. DAVIS, A.B. 



Obedience brings light, and the light of God discloses new spheres 
Of obedience. — Dr. O. E. Brown. 



Rev. William A. Davis was born July 8th, 1865, in Warren County, Missouri. 
His parents, James Bryan Davis, and Permelia Davis, were both members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. His mother is still living. He was converted 
in 1881, at his home near Boles, Franklin County, Missouri, under the ministry of 
Rev. A. T. Tidwell, and joined the Church at Fayette, Missouri, under the ministry 
of Rev. Wm. Penn, October 12th, 1881. He had been a penitent for about a month, 
but cannot tell when the precious peace crept into his heart. One day he found him- 
self trusting and enjoying great peace. He had a clear call to the ministry soon after 
his conversion, which he resisted until he was in an entirely backslidden state. He 
was brought to a sense of his condition while listening to Brother J. H. Ledbetter 
preach. He sought again the favor of the Lord and found it. He had meditated 
much on the subject of perfect love and groaned after that blessing. On his way to 
his next Circuit, as he rode along through the woods in Livingston County, he received 
in answer to a prayer of faith the power to love Him with the whole heart, and his 
neighbor as himself. He rejoiced evermore in this fulness of love. He was licensed to 
preach by the Fayette Quarterly Conference October 20th, 1884; the same _ Quarterly 
Conference recommended him to the Annual Conference for admission on trial August 
4th, 1886, and he was received on trial that same year; Rev. J. H. Ledbetter, Presiding 
Elder, and Bishop H. N. McTyeire presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop E. R. 
Hendrix, September 9th, 1888. He served Renick Circuit, Prairie Hill Circuit, Jameson 
Circuit, Albany Circuit, and is now Missionary to Japan. Under his pastorates one 
church was begun, one finished and one built. He attended the public schools and 
Central College, Fayette, Missouri, from which institution he was graduated. He was 
married to Miss Ada Steva Forster, March 6th, 1889. 



122 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV EDWARD LEE RUTLEDGE. 



Ours is the humble, modest, detailed action of trying to convert 
Sons, daughters, neighbors, and friends. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



By Rev. T. H. B. Anderson, D.D. 

~ "The arrows come so 

thick," said a Greek to 
Leonidas at Thermopo- 
lye, "that they darken 
the sun." "Then we 
shall fight in the 
shade." Here is a man 
armored; he fights as 
courageously in the 
shade as in the sun- 
light. Superior numbers 
and splendid equip- 
ment have no power 
over him. Give him a 
place to stand, an op- 
portunity to pray, men 
to whom he can preach, 
and the slain will be 
many. "He knows 
whom he has believed," 
and knows that the 
word he preaches "shall 
not return unto Him 
void." 

First — Physically, he 
is in perfect health; 
has a closely knitted 
frame, with bone and 
muscle perfect. The 
contour of his face in- 
dicates purpose, kindli- 
n e s s , forcefulness. 
What he plans, he exe- 
cutes; and whether he 
succeeds or fails, there 
is neither boastfulness, 
nor ruefulness. H e 
never cries over spilt 
milk. He does his best, 
and no man can do 
more. 

Second — Mentally, he 
thinks on straight lines. 
The millennium, the 

T^k^^lf h tf^ 6tC " * nd n ° ^ in ^ theology. '"CbetvesThTfhere 

i^L^nthr^^t 11 ^^^ hui , does not give us the dft y jt wil1 be s in - He be " 

an othnti ' b ?V he ^ ay -f 1 nd hour "he knows not. As to healing, the Lord 
tions renentarJp f«ft£ how > K h * Wl11 . ™t s *y. He dwells upon central trutHs-convic- 
"perfect Move " ' "^ ' WltneSS ° f the spirit and the S lorious experience of 

more T contwd a t^t^ iteer ' he £ ai " s steadily; and those who hear him are more and 
The t?embHn^ "if" J « 1S f nd ™, ed ™ th utterance. He gives no "uncertain sound." 
d^gmatifor^ratn'er 1^1^' " ""^ S °'" *"* n ° * lace in his ****- He is 

trainlnTwTw!?, S^T* 1 A advanta 8' es ha ve been fair; not a graduate, but the 
opportunity ZervfhVZf- ¥ ter ^ ^ Uni versities can only give the student an 
Pastor cantur ,$* S ^^ Up ° n h ™ whet her he will make it of service. Any 
an hour with ctX S f ? t0 * ™™***Yj "ve hours daily with the best authors, and 
Twelve hours i?, 1^ ^ WlH mak f him a scholar of no sm *ll ability. There are 
home duties RntlSl T ? re en ° Ugh to s P end in P astor al visiting and attending to 

Fifth HpiSf? Purpose; speaks accurately; thinks correctly, 
chara^e^ brother bel -ed. Frank, honest an? irenic are 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



123 




MR. JOHN WESLEY BELL. 



Men can be to other men as the Shadow of a Great Rock in a 
Thirsty land. — Drummond. 



John Wesley Bell, son of George W Bell and Mariah A. Bell, was born September 
19th, 1850, in Warren County, Virginia. Both parents were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He was converted in 1868, in Asbury Chapel, Warren 
County, Virginia, under the ministry of Rev. James March, and joined the Church 
at the same time. He was converted at the old-fashioned Methodist mourner s bench, 
and still has a firm belief in the old-time religion of our fathers. He has gained relig- 
iously as the years have gone by, has a stronger faith and a more abiding trust in 
the will and word of God, and finds more things for which to offer praise to the bouti- 
ful giver of life, and more to admire and less to condemn in his fellowmen. His educa- 
tion was received at private schools of Virginia. Brother Bell has been a great help 
to Methodism in Rocheport, and in Boone County, as many pastors and presiding elders 
can truly testify. The Lord bless him and his family. He has been twice married, 
first to Miss Cornelia "Potts, March 19th, 1874, of which union three children were 
born, to-wit: Carrie Rush, George B. and Beulah W- Bell. Married the second time 
to Miss Osie J. Potts, June 18th, 1884, and of this union seven children were born- 
Anna C, Osie Marvin, Ethel Gray, John W., Jerome P., Sarah Whitmer and Eunice L. 
Bell. Some of the books that have proven beneficial to him, aside from the Bible, 
have been Bunyan's Pilgrims' Progress, Marvin's Life of Christ, and lhe * utur ?^" e ' 
by Dr. D. R. McAnally He came to Missouri in 1871, and moved to his present home 
in the fall of 1874. He has served as class leader and Sunday School Superintendent 
for fifteen years, trustee of church property thirty years, and steward for twenty-nve 
years, and always ready to make full reports at the Fourth Quarterly Conierence. 



124 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. ALBERT BEAUREGARD CULBERTSON, A.M. 

To Reason, and on reason build resolve, that column of true 
Majesty in man. — Young. 



Albert Beauregard Culbertson, 
son of James A. G. Culbertson 
and Sarah (Selby) Culbertson, 
was born in Callaway County, 
Missouri, near Prairie Chapel 
Methodist Church, January 3rd, 
1861. The father was an earn- 
est Presbyterian and the mother 
as earnest a Methodist. There 
was common sense religion in 
the home, for the son was con- 
verted at the family altar at the 
age of thirteen, "through the in- 
fluence of both father and moth- 
er." At the first opportunity 
the young convert was received 
into the membership of the Prai- 
rie Chapel Church. The death 
of a grandfather, that prince of 
Callaway Methodist stewards, 
Wm. Selby, gave the boy of 
eleven years serious thoughts, in 
which he could hear the voice of 
the departed patriarch singing; 
a testimony of his father in 
class meeting; and a sermon in 
a revival by Dr. Lacey, a Pres- 
byterian minister, these are the 
circumstances that called for 
and produced immediate sur- 
render to Christ. 

The first joy after conversion 
came in the gift of one dollar — 
his all — to Missions at the pas- 
tor's call. Hours of greatest tri- 
umph have been when alone, 
reading God's Word, and in 
^ prayer. While being ordained 

Deacon earnest prayer for full surrender and entire consecration to the work of the 
ministry a marked evidence of answer came. "A careful study of Job, Isaiah, Luke, 
Jonn Komans and Gallatians have transcended all else in enriching my life and 
revealing to me the wonders of His wisdom and grace." 

Dates: Lie ensed to preach by Fulton Station Quarterly Conference, 1886, M. L. 
uray, F.U, and W W. McMurry, P.E. Recommended for admission to traveling con- 
nection by Centenary Charge, St. Joseph, while serving the charge as supply. Re- 
ceived on trial in the Missouri Conference, September, 1890, R. H. Cooper, P.E., and 
Joseph b. Key bishop. Ordained Deacon at Palmyra, Missouri, September 15tK 1889, 
Jf, ioq° p J ° bn C ' 11 ? ran ^ ry; ordain ed Elder by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, September 
yth, 1894, at Carrollton, Missouri. Appointments filled: Centenary, St. Joseph, two 
pJ^m , an ? a i la V two y e A ars 5 Shelbina Station, two years; Palmyra, four years, also 
President of Centenary Academy the latter part of term; Glasgow, four years; Fulton 

W rS ° ne ^ Y + l ar V a « d H r tsv ! Ile since 1904 t0 date, 1906. In these pastorates live 
hundied and thirty-five have been received into the Church. During the term at 
w So ^^Church Y aS re P aired at a cost of $600, and at Huntsvilli the parsonage 
has been built over at a cost of $1,300. 

nnnvi^Tp 013 ? ^^^! 68 H ve been the P ublic and private schools, and the classical 
Ur A S , at t n 1 q£° §f' f ? m - which ins titution was received the degree of Master 
T»n£™ Vi % r il a£ takmg post ^aduate work in "History of Philosophy," 
rS»fL; r ? ghS i- Albert B - Culberts °n and Miss Ann Elizabeth Harrison, of 
h3 5 ?T ty ' Mls . s oun, were married March 18th, 1891. Four sons and two 

ft^ilW aiwpi^ WeS3 ?^ h0 - me ' James Be ™ard, Dulcenia, Harrison Payne, 
KS ^ lbert Bledsoe a " d W iUiam Terrill. The law office and the school work 

c»U tn\Z »£}} V1 t W T re ? an ? nce callin £ the sub J ect of this sk etch aside. The 
call to the ministry has been too clear to permit of wavering. 

Bowman D. Sipple. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



L25 



REV HENRY HORWOOD JOHNSON. 



Omni robore corroborate 

Strengthened with all might. — St. Paul. 



Rev. Henry Horwood Johnson, son of Henry 
and Mary Johnson, both members of the Wes- 
leyan Methodist Church of Bristol, England, 
was born July 2nd, 1866, in the City of Bristol, 
England. He was converted at the Cotham 
Wesleyan Church, at the close of the Sunday 
School, at the earnest solicitation of his Sun- 
day School teacher, Charles Phillips, but he 
believes the chief factor was the godly life and 
teaching of his mother. It was during family 
prayers conducted by his mother that both bis 
father and himself were brought under convic- 
tion. It has been the constant aim cf his life 
to grow in grace, and God has blessed him 
with a clearer revelation of His will, and he 
has earnestly endeavored to pursue the path 
He points out. He loves God and his fellow- 
men. He was licensed to preach by the Local 
Preachers' Meeting of the King Street Wes- 
leyan Circuit, Bristol District, English Confer- 
ence. Rev. George Latham was chairman of 
the District and Superintendent of the Circuit. 
He was fully accredited as a local preacher 
June 4th, 1888; was recommended to the Mis- 
souri Annual Conference, July 22nd, 1893, by 
the Quarterly Conference of Marceline and 
Brookfield, Macon District; and was received 
into the Missouri Conference on trial at Mon- 
roe^City; Rev. C. Grimes, Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop Atticus G. Haygood presiding. Or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop A. G. Haygood, September 17th, 1893, at Monroe City; 
ordained Elder by Bishop John C. Granbery, September 3rd, 1899, at Fayette, Mis- 
souri. Appointments served: Marceline and Brookfield (supply), 1892; New London 
Circuit, 1893; Huntsville, 1896; Memphis, 1900; Monroe City, 1901; Albany, 1902; 
Salisbury and Asbury, 1904. About two hundred and sixty-four persons have oeen 
received into the Church on profession of faith under his ministry. The Huntsville 
Church and the parsonage at Salisbury were built during his pastorates. He was 
educated at the Grammar School, Bristol, England. This school articulated with 
Oxford University; he spent five years there, but did not finish the course. He was 
married to Miss Kayte E. Morgan, of Clifton, England, and they have one child, 
Leslie Morgan. The hour he promised God that he would never refuse to do any- 
thing he was called on to do in His service, but would make an effort to accomplish 
it in His name and leave results with Him, was possibly the most important crisis m 
his life. Pilgrim's Progress, Baxter's "Saint's Rest," "Tongue of Fire, Spirit Pi lied 
Life," "The Mind of the Master," and "The Upper Room" have been some oi the 
books that have proven very helpful and beneficial, aside from the Bible, in his Chris- 
tian life. He believes that all higher education should be under Church auspices. 




126 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISS OURI METHODISM. 



REV S. WESLEY ATTERBERY 



Is not the pilgrim's toil o'er paid 
By the clair rill and palmy shade? 
And see we not, up Earth's dark glade, 
The gate of Heaven unclose? — Keble. 



By Rev. A. B. Culbertson, A.M. 

Asbury and Eliza Atterbery 
were living on a farm near Fay- 
ette, Missouri, when the subject 
of this sketch, Squire Wesley 
Atterbery, was born, November 
16th, 1841. The names of the 
father and son suggest Meth- 
odist love. Rev. S. W. Atter- 
bery's conversion, when seven- 
teen years old, was clear and 
definite. God then and there 
gave him such witness of the 
Spirit that he has ever been 
able to look back to his conver- 
sion with assurance and grati- 
tude. 

The call God gave him to the 
ministry was like his conversion, 
distinct, and he heard it with a 
glad heart and willing mmd. 
His opportunity for education 
was in the public schools and 
about sixteen months at Central 
College. Among religious works 
that have inspired and helped 
him are "Ralston's Elements of 
Divinity," Bledsoe's Works, and 
the books in the Conference 
Course. Several church houses 
have been built by him, and he 
has led scores of souls to light 
and salvation. He was married 
to Mrs. Mary B. Cochran (nee 
Holt) , March 25th, 1875. 

His license to preach was 
granted by the Fayette Quar- 
terly Conference, September, 
1863, and the Quarterly Confer, 
ence of the Flint Hill Circuit recommended him to the Missouri Annual Conference for 
admission on trial, August, 1868, and the following September in Mexico, Mo., he was 
admitted, at which time Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh ordained him Deacon. In September, 
1872, he was ordained Elder by Bishop George F. Pierce. His appointments have all 
been in the Missouri Conference, as follows: Rocheport Circuit, one year; Forest City, 
one year; Savannah, one year; St. Joe, Tenth street, two years; Presiding Elder of the 
Gallatin District, four years; of the Plattsburg District, three years, then at Jameson, 
two years; Gallatin Mission, two years; Huntsville Circuit, two years; Paris, two years; 
Clarence, one year; Prairie Hill, one year; Renick, one year. At the conference oi 
1891, he took a superannuated relation and is today on that honored roll of our Confer- 
ence. As was said of Barnabas, he is a good man, full of faith and the Holy Ghost. 
At his home in Huntsville he is loved and honored by all who know him, and his godly 
influence abides. It is well to note carefully what this man of long years and wide 
observation has to say concerning schools:- "The Christian college is very necessary 
in all its work for both church and state." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



127 



REV EDWARD MELVIN MANN. 



When other lights go out, the Gospel kindles a brighter and a 
Diviner light. — Bishop Haygood. 



By Rev. T. H. Swearingen. 




Rev. Edward Melvin Mann, 
son of Alfred Mann and Nan- 
nie Frances Mann, was born on 
a farm near Keytesville, Mis- 
souri, in 1847. He was hanpily 
converted, August loth, 1867, at 
a meeting held near Brother 
John P. Williams' home, three 
and one-half miles west of 
Keytesville, Missouri. Brother 
Mann was called of God to 
preach, and was so impressed b> 
the Holy Spirit that he felt 
"woe is me if I preach not the 
Gospel." He was licensed to 
preach by the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Prairie Chapel on the 
Keytesville charge, in 1870; 
Rev. William Penn, Presiding 
Elder, and Rev. J. F. Shores, 
preacher in charge. Brother 
Mann was admitted on trial into 
the Missouri Conference at Car- 
rollton, in 1871; Bishop Kava- 
naugh presiding. He had served 
as junior preacher under Rev. 
John F Shores on the Keytes- 
ville Circuit the year previous 
to his joining the Conference. 
He was ordained Deacon at 
Hannibal, Missouri, by Bishop 
Pierce in the fall of 1872; 
Elder by the same Bishop in 
Denver, Colorado, the fall of 
1874. He served five charges 
in the seven years he was 
pastor: Fillmore Circuit, Arch 
Street, Hannibal, Denver. Mob- 

erly and Fayette. He was compelled to give up his work at Fayette on account 
of failing health. He was so ambitious and so consecrated to his work that 
he had to be persuaded much before he would consent to quit his much loved 
employ. He died in peace April 2d, 1877, in his parents' home in Keytesville, Missouri. 
He counted it a God-given privilege to be cared for by his father, mother, brothers 
and sifters, who did all that loved ones could do for him. I was the pastor of Keytes- 
ville Circuit at that time, and was with him often before he died. A short time before 
he passed away, he asked Dr. Marquis, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, and myself, 
to go pray in secret for him, that God might give him relief in His own way, at His 
own time, for His own glory. When we returned from prayer his face lighted up 
and he said, "You don't know how full my poor heart is; I am too weak to tell 
you, but God answers prayer." In a few minutes he passed away in his sister's arms. 
Thus closed the good man's earthly life. I preached his funeral and we laid him to 
rest until God calls him again. Twenty-six years later I was sent back as pastor for 
two years to Keytesville, and during my last pastorate I was called to preach the 
funeral of his aged mother. Oh, that God, the Father, may bring all the family 
to Heaven at last. 



128 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MRS. ADAM HENDRIX. 



Calvary is a love-token given to the whole Universe. 

— Bishop Marvin. 



' .. '■■■■-.-,■•. ■ 




....-, * 






■■^^■'■ /: ^-m^\-- 




;■:>.,,- 




































































































































































































































































■'■"■■ ■-■:'■ 








■ . .,. f ...tV%^i'rw , ■■?■::-;■■; Xy-wl 












^l^^^3^^^^^^^0^ 



mmm^-- : -, ■ ?'■■■■■ ■<■■ ■*$': : ^'■■".•^^^^» 



































































































































































$k<x^d$ 
















A 




















:■:■'""■ \'"-'*' : : ■''^^^■^^A^% : if 


WF 


\ - : 




^K' 




















■■■■.■ ■ ..■■■.;:■.■ 






Jlffe 






.^^^^'-.: 




flP 


















;: ^^^^^^:; 






■;"'■■ «;^ 











































































































































Mrs. Adam Hendrix, so 
long President .-f the 
Women's Foreign Mission- 
ary Society of the Missouri 
Conference, and a Life 
Manager of the Woman's 
Board of Missions of 
the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, interested 
in every good work, espe- 
cially in education and 
missions, deserves a place 
in the annals of the first 
hundred years of Method- 
ism in Missouri. She has 
survived for more than 
thirty years her devoted 
husband, Adam Hendrix, 
who was so long Curator 
and Treasurer of Central 
College, and one of its 
most liberal benefactors, 
having given the first 
$5,000 toward the $100,000 
fund raised after the Civil 
War. Mrs. Hendrix was 
Miss Isabel Jane Murray 
and was born in Baltimore 
County, Maryland, De- 
cember 18th, 1820. Her 
grandfather, John Murray, 
was born in Scotland. Her 
father, John E. Murray, 
was sheriff of Balti- 
more County, Maryland, 
at the time of his mar- 
riage to Sarah Baseman, 
who was of Welsh 
descent. Mrs. Hendrix 
was the eleventh of four- 
teen children, ail of whom 
lived to have families, save one, who died in infancy. She joined the Methodist 
Church in Maryland when a child and never transferred her membership but once, 
and that was from her home to Fayette, Missouri, where she had lived for sixty* 
three years. In 1844 she married Adam Hendrix and removed to Howard County, 
Missouri, where he taught school for some years, later became Treasurer of Howard 
County, and for many years was a well-known banker, a warm friend of Mr. Robert 
A. Barnes of St. Louis, whose large benefactions of more than a million dollars to 
the Methodist Church were in part influenced by that friendship. Mrs. Hendrix was 
the mother of five children, three of whom survive, Bishop E. R. Hendrix, Mrs. A. 
F. Davis and Wilbur F. Hendrix. The cherished wish of their parents was to give 
them the best possible equipment for life. The eldest, Lieutenant F. M. Hendrix, 
graduated at the United States Naval Academy and the late Joseph C. Hendrix, a 
member of Congress and a prominent banker in New York city, took his course 
at Cornell University. Mrs. Hendrix, or "Mother Hendrix," as the Central and 
Howard-Payne students love to call her, has always taken the deepest interest in 
yr>ung life, and despite her fourscore and seven years, is mentally alert, sympathetic 
with all that is good, possessed of most excellent .judgment, a wise counsellor, a cheer- 
ful, jovous believer. The "Isabel Hendrix School," in Bello Horizonte, Brazil, is named 
for this lover of missions. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



129 



MRS. WILLIE LOCKE COOPER. 



Sow sunbeams on the rock and moor, 

And find a harvest home of light! — Horalius Bonar. 



Mrs. Willie Locke Cooper, 

wife of Rev. Rice H. Cooper, 

was born in Chariton County, 

Missouri, July 6th, 1851. In 

early life she became a member 

of the Methodist Church, and 

ever afterward endeavored to 

live up to the high standard of 

her Church. In the winter of 

1877, January 10th, at Bruns- 
wick, Mo., she entered into 

wedded life, and to plighted 

vows was ever true. Nine chil- 
dren were born to bless her love. 

Harry Merchant and Maybird 

died in infancy. Mr. Samuel 

Cooper is one of the substantial 

business men of Fayette. Miss 

Leutie Locke Cooper is a young 

woman of education and refine- 
ment. Robert Cooper and Paul 

Cooper are coming into young 

manhood. Miss Byrd Cooper is 

an accomplished young lady. 

Mark Cooper is the youngest son 

and Miss Constance is the 

youngest of the family. 

It fell to the lot of Rev. R. H. 

Cooper and his wife to live eight 

years in St. Joseph, Mo. There 

they owned a city home, and to 

that dear home the weary itiner- 
ant returned all those years to 

enjoy the fellowship of that 

happy fireside. It was here that 

this writer first became ac- 
quainted with Brother and Sis- 
ter Cooper. It was here I first , , , , . 
felt the charm of the truly unselfish life of Sister Cooper. She had many domestic 
and social duties, but she was never too busy to come into the study and greet with a 
cordial welcome the visiting minister, no matter what his place in the Conference might 
be. Her gentleness endeared her to her husband's friends. In the city, with its many 
allurments and temptations, she stood for truth and integrity. In her Church, she 
advocated the things which make for progress and advancement. When the time came 
for her to leave St. Joseph, she left enshrined in the love many dear friends. It was 
her joy to help in planning their last home, Sunny Side, Fayette, Mo. She entered 
gracefully into the Christian and classic life of Fayette. Her ample new home even 
enlarged her love for entertaining. She sat as a queen at the head of her table, dis- 
pensing hospitality to her guests. When the shadows of suffering fell across her 
spirit, this home to her was all the sweeter. The roses at the doorway were planted 
by her own hands. She was a lover of beauty and of God. When the angels of God 
came they received her spirit into a mansion in the skies. The dear home and tne 
sweet roses of Heaven are hers forever. 




130 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- ALONZO V BAYLEY. 



As the embodiment of love the human spirit finds in Christ the climate 
And the conditions exactly adapted to its own realization. 

—Dr. J. W. Lee. 



Rev. Alonzo V Bayley, whose 
father was a prosperous mer- 
chant of Brunswick, Missouri, 
was born March 20th, 1846. 
His mother was a daughter of 
Dr. Mace C. Spencer, who 
moved from Virginia to Bruns- 
wick about 1835. She married 
Rev. W. G. Caples and died in 
1865, in St. Louis, Mo. Bro. 
Bayley was converted and 
joined the church under the 
ministry of his step-father at 
the age of fifteen. He attended 
the home schools, good ones, till 
they were closed by the Civil 
War, then entered Washington 
University, of St. Louis. 

On account of the death of Mr. 
Caples he at once left school to 
go to the relief of his mother 
and younger brothers and sis- 
ters, the older brothers being 
absent in the Confederate 
Army. 

He took a course in commer- 
cial college and was employed 
in a commission office in St. 
Louis; then as secretary by 
Rev. Jas. 0. Swinney, of Glas- 
gow; then read law for a short 
time under Judge Thos. Shack- 
leford till convinced he ought to 
preach. He was recommended 
by the Brunswick church, Rev. 
Wm. Perkins, pastor, and was 
licensed, signed by Horace 
tt Brown, presiding elder. 

t? wa « recommended for admission on trial by the Quarterly Conference of Glas- 
?°7l + l V ' a , J? n » P astor > and Rev. Wm. A. Mayhew, presiding elder; was admit- 

ted to the Annual Conference on trial at Weston, 1868. He was ordained deacon, 1870, 
Bisho aV pirrce by Bishop McT yeire, and elder in 1872, at Nebraska City, by 

enn In l 884 ,.^ parried Miss Belle M. Clough, a noble Christian, of Columbia, Mis- 

KVpVi m 1900, leaving three sons and two daughters— Alphonso V. Bayley, 

Albert L. Bayley, Ernest R. Bayley, Minnie B. Bayley, and Julia C. Bayley. 

Q + Af l- mmiS ™ y . as been in Kansas, Nebraska and Missouri, attended with revivals 

pLi 5°2l J^atsburg, Dearborn, Canton and Clarksville, with camp-meetings at 

raoia and bhelbyville and erecting churches at Kirksville and Gallatin. 

table twen ty-hve years he assisted Brother Vincil at the Conference Secretary's 

Tv! ter * h £ty-twc> years of active service, impaired health required superannuation. 

i* rv™°" gn £! s J n ?? ther died when h e was nineteen, to her teaching and example he 
is more indebted than any other. 

consider'aV* 11 ^ childhood ' fa mily and friends have been partial, the Conference kindly 
tained! Unspeakable sorrow > brotherly sympathy has cheered and God's grace sus- 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



131 



REV. WILLIAM PENN. 



But ye are come unto Mount Sion, and unto the city of the 
Living God, the heavenly Jerusalem.— St. Paul. 



Rev. William Penn was born 
February 21st, 1836, in Warren 
County, Kentucky. He was a 
son of Rev. James Penn and 
Mary Penn, both of whom were 
members of the Methodist 
Church all their lives. He was 
a brother of Rev. John Wesley 
Penn, Rev. George W. Penn, 
Rev. Thomson Penn, Edward 
M. Penn and James W Penn. 
He was converted September 
1st, 1850, in Green County, 
Kentucky, and was received 
into the church the evening of 
his conversion. His growth in 
grace steadily increased for 
thirty-five years, or during his 
ministry. Much depended upon 
system and punctuality in the 
use of the means of religious 
growth. He was for a time a 
licensed exhorter under Rev. 
James M. Green, pastor of the 
Montecello Circuit; his father, 
Rev. James Penn, being the 
assistant preacher under Rev. 
Horace Brown, Presiding Elder, 
who employed him. He was rec- 
ommended for license to preach 
by the church at LaGrange, at 
which place he was attending 
school; the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Hydesburg, Hannibal 
District, recommended him to 
the Annual Conference, and he 
was received into the Annual 
Conference in 1853; Rev. 
Andrew Monroe, Presiding 

Elder, and Bishop James O. Andrew presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop 
Early at Richmond, Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop J. 0. Andrew at Glasgow, 
Missouri. Brother Penn served our Circuits and Stations acceptably. His greatest 
work was as Presiding Elder. He was one of our best Presiding Elders. Many souls 
were converted in the time of his ministry, and it was his pleasure to minister to 
their edification in the faith. He attended Rev. Mr. Whipple's Academy at LaGrange, 
Missouri. He was a student all his days, and became a master in his line. He was 
Curator of Howard Female College for about ten years of his itinerant life, and 
took great interest in Christian education. He was married three times, first to Miss 
Maria E. Earnest, in January, 1854; then to Miss Orion E. Stephenson in December, 
1867; and to Miss Susan M. Matheny, March 15th, 1882. His children are Earnest 
E. Penn, Mary E. Penn, Laura B. Penn, Henry C. Penn, Florence A. Penn, Thomson 
J. Penn, and Edwin M. Penn. "The church has been my first and strongest love," he 
wrote. Brother Penn sent his sons to Central College and gave them the best possible 
education. He died at Woodlandville, Boone County, Missouri. 




132 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV HENRY EDGAR DRAPER, A. B. 



As God created Man, so God's Son created Manliness. 

— Dr. William A. Quayle. 



Rev. Henry E. Draper, the subject of this sketch, was born in Smith County, 
Tennessee, January the 13th, 1873. His parents, Brice R. and Mary Coward Draper, 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and brought up their children 
m the faith. . 

Being thrown on his own resources at the age of twenty, he set out to ok™ 1 " 
an education at all cost, and for ten years struggled to this end. First he attended 
the country and village schools, taught four years in his native state, and afterwards 
came West, attended the Missouri State University, and graduated from that institu- 
tion with the A. B. degree, 1903. 

June the 1st, 1891, under the preaching of that rare evangelist, Rev. Sam P. Jones, 
he was converted and afterwards joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in 
South Carrollton, Kentucky, receiving the ordinances of baptism from his uncle, the 
Rev. S. L. C. Coward, of the Louisville Conference. His license to preach was 
granted by the Lebanon, Tennessee, District Conference, June 28th, 1895. 

His marriage to Miss Ova M. Perkins in 1898 has been a happy one. Mrs. Dr aPJ* 
is gifted especially in working with the Juniors of the church. In the year 1898 
they came to Missouri. His first work in Missouri as a preacher was on the Columbia 
Circuit, which he organized and where he preached as a supply for five years. The 
Fair View church on this Circuit was built during his pastorate. He joined the Mis- 
souri Conference at Mexico, Missouri, September, 1903, and was ordained Deacon by 
Bishop Hendrix two years later at Palmyra, Missouri. He considers that the way was 
opened to him to complete his University course in answer to prayer. Thrice blessed 
the man who can point to some season and say "I know God then heard and answered 
my prayer." God's answer to one prayer is the pledge and assurance of other and 
greater answers. 

It is no wonder that this man has been abundant in labors and that scores of 
souls have been led to Christ under his ministry, since he counts it his highest privilege 
to serve God in the capacity of a minister of the Gospel, and prays only for efficiency 
and qualification as God sees best. This coming September, 1907, he will close a 
very successful four years' pastorate at ArmstroKg. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



133 




REV ROBERT MORRIS HARDAWAY. 



May all that is noble in our thought embody itself in all that is 
Generous in Action. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Rev. Robert Morris Hardaway, son of Benjamin Aker Hardaway, was born in 
Breckenridge County, Kentucky, October 18th, 1854. He was educated under Dr. D. 
C. Clarkson, a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University. In 1875 he entered Vanderbilt 
University, this being the first year in the history of this noble institution, and in 
1878 finished his course, one among her first graduates. On September 18th, 1879, he 
was married to Miss Mary Emma Cox, also a pupil of Dr. D. C. Clarkson, and later 
a graduate of Logan Female College, Russellville, Kentucky. Four children were 
born of this marriage, Mary Elstone Hardaway, John Benjamin Hardaway, Robert 
Morris Hardaway and Wallace Duncan Hardaway. In the same month of his wed- 
ding, September, 1879, he was received into the Louisville Conference at Madisonville, 
Kentucky, and was appointed to Shepherdsville, Kentucky. He served twelve years 
in this Conference, his last charge being Brandenburg. By a transfer of territory he 
was led to join the Illinois Conference in 1890, and served seven years as Presiding 
Elder of Pana District, preacher in charge of Kinmundy, Nashville and Marion 
Churches. In the year 1897 he joined the Missouri Conference, in which he has 
served Osborn, Millville, Hardin, St. Charles and Glasgow. Brother Hardaway is a 
good preacher and a fine pastor. His wife is one of the noble women of Methodism. 
His sons are men of promise. He preaches a thoughtful gospel and attends to all the 
details^ of a Methodist preacher's work. He can be depended upon to bring up his 
collections, and all this work is done by wholesome methods. 



134 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JAMES HENRY HAGER. 



Man's religious, moral, and intellectual activities are evermore 
And everywhere the Spirit's field. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. James Henry Hager was born in Cabol County, Virginia, near the City of 
Huntington, August 13th, 1846. When about three years old his father moved to 
Kentucky where he was reared. His father was Harmon Daniel Hager, and his moth- 
er's name was Letitia Brown Hager. Both parents were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, from the time he was a small boy. Their home was the 
preacher's stopping place during the life-time of his mother. He was converted in 
1868, in Jackson, Kentucky, when alone, a little after nightfall. He had been a 
seeker for two years. He had joined the church when ten years old under the minis- 
try of Rev. W. W. Chamberlain, of the Kentucky Conference. He was religiously in- 
clined from his youth up. He was licensed to preach by the West Liberty District 
of the Kentucky Conference, Rev. Elkanah Johnson, Presiding Elder, October 31st, 
1868; the same Quarterly Conference recommended him to the Annual Conference in 
1871, and he was received into the Annual Conference that same year; Bishop Wight- 
man, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Wightman in 1874, at Mt. Sterl- 
ing, Kentucky; ordained Elder by Bishop Kavanaugh, at Charleston, West Virginia, in 
1876. He served a number of charges in Kentucky and West Virginia before being 
transferred to the Missouri Conference in 1886. He now lives in Oklahoma. He has 
received about four hundred and seventy-eight persons into the church, with perhaps 
nearly as many more who have been converted in the meetings in which he has labored. 
He received his education in the common schools of Kentucky, and also received private 
instruction under Rev. N. G. Robinson and Rev. Lewis Mays, both of whom were good 
scholars and gave him great help in carrying on his studies. He was first married 
to Miss Elmira Combs, July 13th, 1868, and again married to Miss Ruann L. Walsh, 
August 18th, 1872. The following named children were born to him: Samuel Eugene 
Hager and Warren Stewart Hager (children of his first wife), and Lulu Bell Hager, 
Letitia Alia Hager, May Grace Hager, Sally Hager, James H. Hager, Annie Lillian 
Hager (children of the second marriage) His oldest son was licensed to preach by 
the Millersburg Quarterly Conference, Kentucky. Rev. James H. Hager, his son, is 
a missionary to Japan, and a man of high standing. 









Le&al Publishing Co. St.Louis 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 135 



HON. THOMAS SHACKELFORD. 



And as those nightly tapers disappear when day's bright lord 
Ascends our hemisphere, so pale grows Reason at Religion's 
Sight. — Dryden. 

Thomas Shackelford, layman, is the son of Mr. Thomas Shackelford and Mrs. 
Eliza Chieves Shackelford. His father was a native of Virginia and his mother was 
a native of North Carolina, of Huguenot stock. His father was not a professor of 
religion. He had imbibed the sentiments of Tom Paine and was a constant reader of 
Paine's "Age of Reason." His mother was reared in the Baptist faith and was 
converted under the ministry of Rev. A. P. Williams. She attended a three-weeks 
debate between Rev. A. P. Williams and Rev. Jesse Greene. As a result of that 
debate she united with the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Thomas Shackelford was born in Saline County in the state of Missouri on the 
6th of February, 1822. He was converted at Glasgow, Missouri, in September, 1847, 
under the ministry of the Rev. W- G. Caples, and joined the church then and was 
baptized by Rev. Andrew Monroe, Presiding Elder. He says he made the mistake of 
his life prior to his conversion by judging Christianity by the walk of the worst 
rather than the best members. The beautiful walk of his mother, elder sister, and 
brother-in-law, made such an impression upon him that he was convinced that some- 
thing more was wanted to secure human happiness than a moral life, that true virtue 
was "temptation resisted." Joy and Peace came while reading in the silence of his 
own room the fifth chapter of Romans, the first verse beginning: "Therefore, being 
justified by faith we have Peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ." But 
Doubts came and he never felt assured until he resolved to work in the service of the 
Master in every way he could. He was appointed leader in a class composed of old 
members of the Church. He now looks back with pleasure and gratitude to the 
many uplifting scenes in that classroom. The next step was to attend faithfully to 
all the means of grace. The work in the Sabbath School was a delight. He was 
thus impressed with the conviction that in order to maintain Spiritual and Physical 
health that a faithful attendance on the means of grace would break the monotony 
of business life and while good for the Spiritual man would also insure bodily health 
and thus give joy and peace in life's pilgrimage. He early refused the use of 
tobacco in any form. When a small boy leaning on his mother's lap she asked him 
to promise her that he would never enter the doors of a saloon. It is a sweet remem- 
brance of this mother when he can say in truth he never violated that promise. He 
was the author of the legislation on the subject of Temperance put in Discipline 
at the Memphis General Conference. 

Let me close this sketch in the language of David Starr Jordan: "My message 
shall appeal to enthusiasm in things of life. A call to do things because we love 
them, to love things because we do them, to keep the eyes open, the heart warm and 
the pulse swift as we move across the field of life." 



136 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JOHN ANDREW HUGHES. 



Let not my bark in calm abide, but win her fearless way against 
The chafing tide. — Keble. 



By Rev. A. B. Culbertson, A. M. 

Rev. John Andrew Hughes is the son of Kentucky Methodists, Henry and Hero 
Hughes. He was born in Owen County of that state, August 20th, 1871. His "Second 
Birth" was given him around the fireside in the County of Callaway, Missouri, during 
the autumn of 1886. He did not join the church till 1888. His growth in grace 
has been constant and gradual, and his love for God and sympathy with his fellow- 
men develops from day to day. He was granted license to preach by the Mexico 
District Conference, March the 20th, 1902, Rev. John Anderson, D. D., presiding, 
and one year later he was recommended by the St. Charles District Conference to 
the Missouri Annual Conference for admission on trial. The Annual Conference 
met in Mexico, Missouri, September, 1903, and he was received on trial, Bishop 
Charles B. Galloway presiding. His first appointment was Silex Circuit, St. Charles 
District. He served this charge three years, and last conference (September, 1905). 
Bishop E. R. Hendrix appointed him to the Dalton Circuit in the Fayette District. 
Twenty-five persons have been added to the church under his ministry. He attended 
school at Westminster College for some time, but did not complete the course. 

He was married to Miss Jennie Norvell, September 24th, 1903. 

He is fond of history and considers that "Redford's History of Methodism in 
Kentucky" has exercised a great influence over him. His words for the Christian 
College are: "It supplies a deep felt need to which the merely secular schools do 
not minister." 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



137 




DR. CHARLES W. WATTS. 



Beholding shall confess that here on earth God hath dispensed 
His bounties as in Heaven. — Milton. 



Dr. Charles W. Watts was born in Huntsville, Missouri, August 24th, 1844. He 
vas dedicated to the service of God by Holy baptism in infancy by the Rev. Jesse 
Jreen, of precious memory, in 1844. He was called to preach, and preached his 
irst sermon in 1849, to a congregation of children in his father's yard, the occasion 
>eing the funeral of a canary bird. They buried little Dick in a match box in the 
garden, and many were the heart aches and tears that were shed from pure sorrow 
md grief. The sermon was preached at the request of his sister who went to Jesus 
n 1865. A lady is still living in Huntsville, Missouri, who heard that sermon and 
vas converted. He was licensed to preach in 1872, by Rev. B. H. Spencer. In 1874 
ie was received on trial into the Annual Conference at St. Joseph, Missouri; Bishops 
keener and Marvin presiding at that Conference. Dr. Watts served the following 
charges: Gosneyville, Kearney, Haynesville, Rushville, New Market, Weston, St. 
Joseph, Missouri, at Frederick Avenue Church, Auxvasse, Norborne, Farber. He 
ocated in Mexico, Missouri, in 1886, and since then has helped in various fields of 
abor in Tennessee, Arkansas and Missouri as an evangelist. He was ordained Deacon 
>y Bishop McTyeire in 1876, at Hannibal, Missouri, and ordained Elder by Bishop 
iVightman a few years later at Louisiana, Missouri. A great many people have been 
'eceived into the church under his ministry, and he has baptized many infants. He 
says that whatever he has accomplished in the ministry has been done by God's help 
>nly, his motto being "Jesus and the Resurrection." 

This sketch should not come to a close without a tribute to the father and 
nother of Dr. Watts. These were devout and influential people in Fayette, Missouri. 
Lney were choice spirits. 



133 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MRS. SUSAN ANN ROBERTS RICH. 



The Bible was intended to enlighten Man upon those matters 
Which appertain to his own condition, duty and destiny. 

^ — Bishop Marvin. 



Susan Ann Roberts, the 
daughter of James Roberts and 
his wife, Clarissa, was born in 
Garrard County, Kentucky, 
September 28th, 1828. At an 
ear3y age she moved with her 
father and his family to Boone 
County, Missouri, and they set- 
tled on a farm on a portion of 
which is located a part of the 
town of Ashland. While yet 
quite young she was converted 
and joined Salem Baptist 
Church, near Ashland, under the 
ministry of Dr. Noah Doyle, but 
afterward, her father having 
been converted and having 
been largely instrumental in 
erecting a church building on 
his farm and having assumed 
church relations with the Meth- 
odists, Susan also united with 
the Methodists. In 1849 her 
mother died and the duties of 
housekeeper for a large family 
of children and servants de- 
volved largely on Susan. On 
September 26th, 1854, she was 
united in marriage with the 
Rev. George W- Rich, the then 
preacher in charge of Ashland 
Circuit, the Rev. Enoch M. Mar- 
vin performing the marriage 
ceremony. Mr. Rich was a 
Northern-born man and because 
of that fact her Kentucky 
father expressed very emphatic 
disapproval of the marriage 
when the proposition was first 
submitted to him, but afterward became thoroughly reconciled and was heard to 
say: "When you do strike a good Yankee he is a very acceptable man." Mrs. Rich 
accompanied her husband to the various Circuits which he traveled as a Methodist 
preacher until her condition of health rendered her unable longer to do so. During 
the war between the States she was thrown from a horse, the back of her head 
striking against some hard substance causing injury to the nerves that produced a 
palsied condition which continually grew worse till her death. Her school °PP or ,~ 
tunities were not good, but she was by nature well endowed mentally, shrewd, and, 
though somewhat reserved, possessed of a fine sense of humor; before the hardships 
of life began to make inroads on her physical system she was a beautiful woman, 
tall, active, with black hair and eyes. Her reading was confined, for the most part, 
to the Bible, books of sermons of which Marvin's was her favorite, and the St. 
Louis Advocate. Three of her children, Samuel, Charles and Ida, died in infancy. 
One brother, William M. Roberts, Ashland, Missouri, one sister, Mrs. Julia A. Britt, 
Rockville, Missouri, three children, John A. Rich, Slater, Missouri, Mrs. Lula Warren, 
Lexington, Missouri, and James B. Rich, Fayette, Missouri, survive her. She died 
at the home of her son-in-law, Prof. Alfred P. Warren, at Fayette, May 1st, l 8 "r 
and her body was deposited beside that of her husband's, in the old cemetery therc- 
The surviving children fully expect that the family will be reunited in Heaven. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



j 39 



REV. GEORGE WHEELOCK RICH. 



Heaven gives us friends to bless the present scene; resumes 
Them, to prepare us for the next. — Young. 

Rev. George Wheelock Rich 

was born in Chittenden County, 

Vermont, November 21st, 1818. 

His father was Samuel Rich, of 

English descent; his mother, 

before her marriage, Sarah 

Wheelock; they were devout 

Congregationalists ; both died 

before George was ten years 

old, though he continued under 

the care of religious people till 

he reached his majority. His 

guardian carefully prepared 

him to enter College but, seized 

with the "Western Fever," as 

soon as he became possessed of 

his small patrimony he left 

Vermont in 1840 and never re- 
turned. For two years he 

taught school in Jackson 

County, Michigan, then went to 

Fort * Leavenworth, Kansas, 

where lived his brother, Hiram 

Rich, a merchant. In 1843 he 

went to Santa Fe, returning the 

following August. For several 

years he was a very efficient 

district school teacher in How- 
ard County, Missouri, and in 

1851 (quoting his language), 

"at a camp-meeting held at 

Bethel, between Fayette and 

Glasgow, resulting in many 

conversions, I was most power- 
fully converted; this work was 

of God." At once he began to 

respond to the call to preach, of 

which he entertained no doubt, 

exhorting and conducting religious services at the request of Rev. Andrew Monroe, 
Presiding Elder. Licensed to preach in the Spring of 1852, he was assigned work 
on the Huntsville Circuit as junior under Rev. Martin L. Eads, preacher in charge. 
Pursuing the usual course of study he was ordained Deacon by Bishop Kavanaugh, 
1854; Elder by Bishop Pierce, 1856. He was over six feet tall, very strong physically. 
Dr. Joseph H. Pritchett says of him: "He had naturally a good mind and average 
education for his day. His early ministry was remarkably efficient. His thoughts 
were clear, his feelings profound." He was known among his brethren as the 
weeping prophet." I have no doubt that he injured himself, physically, by over-ex- 
ertion in preaching, prompted by the impulses of his strong, emotional nature. Because 
of "over-exertion in preaching" his throat gave out, compelling him to locate m 1858; 
teaching one year at Rocheport, one in Howard High School; in 1860 he purchased 
and moved to a farm in Howard County. Of great energy and endurance he worked 
with the hired hands in the field, "always lifting the big end of the log." He taught 
school in the winter and preached nearly every Sunday till silenced by the authorities 
for refusing to take a certain oath prescribed for preachers; being lodged in jail he 
was released through the importunities of friends. He would have succeeded well as a 
money-maker had he devoted his efforts thereto. Readmitted in 1868, in 1870 super- 
numerary, effective in 1875 and so continuing till superannuation in 1887, though 
thereafter he continued to preach till stricken with his last illness. After conference 
superannuation he was instrumental in erecting a new church building in baline 
County which bears the name, "Rich Chapel." Saturday, December 23d, 1889, against 
the protest of family and physician, he rode from his home in Slater, Missouri, ten 
miles, to Walnut Grove, preached and administered the Lord's Su PP e * t^® - nex * day, 
returned home Monday and took to his bed, where he remained till he died March 5th, 
1890. Shortly before his death he testified to his faith in God. 




140 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. DR. WILLIAM B. WATTS. 



Then farewell Night! of darkness, now, no more; joy breaks, 
Shines, triumphs; 'tis eternal day. — Young. 



Rev. Dr. William B. Watts 
was born in Madison County,. 
Virginia, October 4th, 1804. He 
died in Chariton County, Mis- 
souri, December 12th, 1S78. He 
was twice married, first to Miss 
Sarah Blakey, and during her 
life they were converted, they 
being young people fond of 
worldly pleasures. While at- 
tending a camp-meeting near 
Ruckersville, Virginia, she was 
convicted of sin and went to the 
altar for prayer; he, thinking 
that if she became a Christian, 
it would spoil all their pleasure, 
went to the altar and led her 
to a tent. The minister seeing 
it, called on the congregation to 
get on their knees and pray for 
that young man. They joined 
in prayer as one voice, the min- 
ister leading; it was not many 
moments until he was power- 
fully convicted, and his cries 
for mercy were heard at the 
altar; then went to the tent 
from the altar and he and his 
wife were happily converted be- 
fore they left their knees. 
From that time on his life was 
one of a consistent Christian. 
His second marriage was to 
Miss Elizabeth Burton, his first 
wife dying in early life. His 
second wife was always a help 
to him in his Christian life. In 
1835 he moved to Missouri with 
his family. Soon after he was converted he felt the call to preach the Gospel, which 
he did and was ordained Deacon by Bishop Morris in Fayette, Missouri, in 1839; 
ordained Elder by Bishop Paine in St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1850, when he took work 
as an itinerant, but owing to his family being too cumbersome he only sustained this 
relation to the Conference a year or two. After that he had regular appointments 
as a local preacher, until stricken with paralysis in 1867. From that time up to 
the time of his death he preached whenever he was able. He was also a great Tem- 
perance worker and did much good in that work. He helped a great deal in pro- 
tracted meetings and was the means of bringing many souls to Christ. Though gone 
to his reward there is yet fruit of his labors left to carry on the work. One who 
knew him for forty years says that his life was one of constant piety and that he- 
had a constant desire for the salvation of souls. This sketch is signed by Mrs. T~ 
E. Gilliam, Mrs. P, S. Williams, daughters, and Mrs. M. M. Pitts, a sister. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



141 



REV. JOSEPH Y. BLAKEY. 



The spider's most attenuated thread is cord, is cable, to man's 
Tender tie on earthly bliss; it breaks at every breeze. — Young. 

By Rev. Bowman D. Sipple. 
Rev. Joseph Y. Blakey was 
born in Howard County, Mis- 
souri, November 20, 1836 ; united 
with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, as a seeker of 
religion in August, 1855, under 
the ministry of Rev. M. R. 
Jones at Haynesville Missouri; 
was converted at Antioch 
Church, near Hainesville, in a 
meeting held by the "O'Kelley- 
ite" Methodists, now "Christian 
Union"; was married to Miss 
Ella Arnold in Clay County, in 
1861; was licensed to exhort by 
the Greenville Society, Haynes- 
ville, now Kearney and Lathrop 
Circuit, Weston, now Platts- 
burg District, May, 1862, Rev. 
W. A. Tarwater, Presiding 
Elder; was licensed to preach, 
August, 1862, Rev. M. R. Jones, 
Presiding Elder; supplied the 
Liberty Circuit, 1866-7; Rev. 
William M. Rush, Presiding 
Elder; was received on trial at 
Macon, September 5, 1867, and 
ordained Deacon by Bishop 
Marvin; ordained Elder in 1871, 
by Bishop Doggett, and contin- 
ued to preach the Gospel, that 
had done him so much good, as 
long as strength would permit. 
The pastoral charges served 
were in the following order: 
Camden, Gallatin, Spring Hill, 
Brunswick and Keytesville, Lin- 
neus, Platte City and Weston, 

Montgomery City, Jonesburg, Pleasant Grove, Fulton Station, St. Charles Station, 
Chillicothe Station, Albany Station, Lawson and Lathrop, Cameron Station, Bruns- 
wick Station, Triplett, Hardin, New Franklin and Clark, Armstrong, Cedar City, 
Madison, and Glasgow Circuit. For one year he was a superannuate, the result of 
many years of suffering in the midst of toil. More than twenty years before his 
death the writer of this sketch first knew him, and he was then a great sufferer. 
Yet he did his work faithfully. Brother Blakey was a strong preacher of the Word, 
ready in debate, possessed of a kind heart, well suited to the pastoral work which he 
kept up faithfully. Many boys were inspired to a better life by his talks about the fire- 
side in the country home as he spent the night; many homes were blessed by his 
earnest prayers at the family altar; strong friendships were formed with the best 
people in humble life as well as in wealthy homes. His mission was to all classes. 
He had access to the young people. As he grew older it was his delight to have 
young preachers to help him in revivals. No jealousy was in his heart. The strongest 
words of commendation would be given in public and private for the services of 
such young men. The list of appointments indicates a successful ministry. In the 
midst of his labors in one of the last charges he served the writer found him as 
eager to save souls as in his earlier years. His last year was spent with the 
knowledge of the approaching end. The preparation did not bring gloom and despair 
to him. "On the contrary, it was a happy year, a year of deepening humility and 
broadening love." For thirty-one years he had not missed a conference. The 
Missouri Conference met in Memphis, August 31, 1898. Joseph Y. Blakey did not 
answer to his name at roll-call, for he was within seven hours of the roll-call above. 
He died in Fayette, Missouri, in the county of his birth, where he was loved and 
appreciated most. 




142 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- DAVID FRANCIS BONE. 



To take the Cross and follow Thee, where love and duty lead, 
Shall be my portion and my praise. — Madame Guyon. 



By Rev. A. B. Culbertson, A. M. 

Rev. D. F, Bone, the son of Levi and Catherine 
Jane (Burros) Bone, who came from Kentucky 
and settled near Carrollton, Missouri, in 1839, was 
born on a farm near that town, January 5th, 1843. 
His mother was a niece of Rev. Ruben Burrow, 
who helped to found the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church. When only four years old his father 
died, but his mother kept the fire burning on the 
home altar. At the age of seven, while his mother 
was singing, "Home, Sweet Home," his heart was 
touched and conversation together soon brought 
to him sweet peace of soul. Beirlg left with the 
early care of his mother, and having joined the 
Confederate army when only seventeen years old, 
deprived him of much early school advantages. In 
the army under the preaching of Bishop Enoch 
M. Marvin he was led to see that he had gone 
far away from his God and, after a whole night 
of struggle in prayer, he could truly say "The 
Lord has restored unto me the joys of His 
Salvation." He considers this night of prayer the 
crisis in his Christian career. Though a member 
of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, the 
church of his mother in his boyhood days, he 
placed his certificate of membership from the 
army church with the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, at Carrollton, Missouri. In 1868, this 
Quarterly Conference gave him license to preach 
and recommended him for the traveling connec- 
tion. In the fall of 1868, he was admitted on trial into the Missouri Annual Confer- 
ence, which met at Weston, Missouri. He received his Deacon Orders in 1879, and 
Elders Orders in 1873 — sickness having prevented his being present at the conference 
of 1872. He has been an active itinerant for thirty-six years hi the Missouri Con- 
ference and has served the following charges in the order named: Camden, two years; 
Norborne, one; Mandeville, one; Liberty and Missouri City, one; Osborn, two; Platte 
City, two; Davis Chapel and Mount Moriah, two; St. Joseph Circuit, three; Hundley 
Chapel, one; Tenth Street, one; Savannah, two; Maryville, one; Mound City, two; 
Hoagland Chapel, one; Fayette Circuit, two; Centenary — St. Joseph, one; Dearborn 
Circuit, four; Lineville, one; Gallatin District, four; Monroe City, two, and now in his 
third year as pastor of Higbee Circuit. He has married twice. First to Miss Ella 
M. Devlin. Their children are Rev. Joseph Marvin, Charles Spencer, Fannie Laura, 
Frank Lee, and Anna Ella. September 3rd, 1885, he was married to Miss Nannie 
V. Paulette. Their children are Mary, Catherine, Paulette and Mildred Virginia. 
"Pilgrim's Progress," "Saints Rest," "Man of Gallilee," "Fletcher's Checks," "The 
Mind of the Master," and "Skilled Labor for the Master" are books he has read with 
great profit. 

Of the Church School he says: "The church must endow, equip and maintain 
far better colleges and universities, if she would train the young men and women, 
save the church, the state, the nation, and the world: and this is her only business 
in the world." 

He has been especially gifted with evangelistic powers, and those who have pro- 
fessed faith in Jesus under his preaching are numbered by the thousand. Many of 
the preachers in the Missouri Conference whom he has assisted in meetings will tes- 
tify to his gifts in this direction. Six church houses and three parsonages have been 
built under his pastorate. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



143 



REV. THOMAS HOWARD SWEARINGEN. 



Sed recipietis virtuem Spiritus Sancti, postquam supervenerit 
in vos. — Jesus. 

But ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come 
Upon you. 



Rev. Thomas Howard Swear- 

ingen was born March 9th, 

1852, in Platte County, Mis- 
souri. His father, John Swear- 

ingen, and mother, Miiia Jane 

Swearingen, were both mem- 
bers of the Missionary Baptist 

Church. He was very marvel- 

ously converted at a campmeet- 

ing held by local preachers at 

Morrow's campground not far 

from Perrin, Missouri, Septem- 
ber 15th, 1870. He joined the 

church the 19th of September, 

at the said camp ground. He 

has never to this day doubted 

the great work God did for 

him at that time, but his 

growth in grace, on account of 

his unfaithfulness, as he terms 

it, was much slower than it 

should have been. After preach- 
ing for a number of years, the 

Holy Spirit convinced him, 

through the Word as he studied 

it, that he could be sanctified 

and be made perfect in love, 

so as he had taken vows upon 

him to go into perfection, (per- 
fect love in this life), he began 
earnestly and prayerfully to 
seek it, and continued seeking it, 

more or less, for years, and 

God, true to His promises, 
sanctified his soul June 22nd. 
1896. He was licensed to preach 
by the Quarterly Conference of 
Osborn Circuit, Plattsburg Dis- 
trict, held at Stewartsville, Missouri, September 12th, 1874; Rev. D. F. Bone preacher 
in charge and Rev. W. E. Dockery, Presiding Elder. He was received into the 
Missouri Annual Conference on trial at St. Joseph, Missouri, September 15th, 1874; 
Rev. W. E. Dockery, Presiding Elder, and Bishop John C. Keener, presiding. He was 
ordained Deacon at Hannibal, Missouri, September 17th, 1876, by Bishop Holland N. 
McTyeire, and was ordained Elder by Bishop David S. Doggett at Macon City, Mis- 
sorui, September 15th, 1878. Appointments filled, commencing in 1874: Polo Charge, 
1874-1876; Keytesville, 1876-1877; Beckenridge, 1877-1878; transferred to Western 
Conference and was stationed at Wyandotte, Kansas, from 1878 to 1880; Atchison,. 
Kansas, 1880-1881; transferred back to Missouri Conference and served at Platte- 
City from 1881 to 1882; Lathrop and Lawson, 1882 to 1884; went to Colorado, and 
when Brother Lee died, he was appointed to fill out his time at Morrison Chapel,.. 
Denver, Colorado, in 1885; then at Millville, Missouri, from 1885 to 1889; Platts- 
burg, 1889-1891; St. Joseph Circuit, 1891-1895; Savannah Circuit, 1895-1898; Stur- 
geon, 1898-1900; Keytesville and Asbury Chapel, 1900-1902; Armstrong, 1902-1903; 
supernumerary 1903-1904; Hallsville Charge, 1904-1906; supernumerary at present, 
1906-1907, and possibly longer. He has received into the church about fifteen hundred;: 
built two churches while on Polo work; finished up one at Holt; built one on St. Joseph 
Circuit; bought the lot at Savannah; built the parsonage at Wyandotte, Kansas; fin- 
ished one at Atchison; built a new one at Savannah; bought the parsonage at Mill- 
ville; paid for one at Keytesville, and built one at Armstrong. His education was re- 
ceived at public schools, with two terms at Central College, Fayette, Missouri. He 
was married March 20th, 1879, to Miss Isabelle N. Bryan. 




144 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV FRED EARNEST MOSLEY. 



Life is given for Culture; Culture is bestowed for fruit. — Dr. 

Joseph Parker. 

By Rev. A. B. Culbertson, A. M. 
Rev. Fred Earnest Mosley first saw the light of day in Clinton County, Missouri, 
June 5th, 1877. He is the son of Henry C. and Catherine Mosley, both members 
of the Missionary Baptist Church. 

He was "Born Again" at Kearney, Missouri, December, 1897, after being brought 
under deep conviction for sin by the preaching of evangelist Weaver of the Presby- 
terian persuasion, and earnestly seeking pardon for two days and nights. As soon 
as God gave peace to his soul he applied for admission into the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, at Kearney, Missouri. Rev. L. N. Wagoner, pastor. With his con- 
version came a distinct call to preach the gospel. This call was, for a time, resisted, 
even to the spiritual hurt of his soul. But finally, in the Providence of God, he gav a . 
himself wholly to this call, and has since had joy in His service and clear evidence 
of divine approval. 

He received his license to preach from the Fayette District Conference, May 
the 10th, 1900, Rev. John Anderson, D. D., Presiding Elder, and Rev. G. M. Gibson 
was his pastor. 

For his school life he spent three years in Central College and one year in the 
Missouri State University. 

At the Fayette District Conference, March 29th, 1905, he was recommended to 
the Missouri Annual Conference for admission on trial, and was received in the fol- 
lowing September, Bishop E. R. Hendrix presiding, and ordaining him Deacon at the 
session of this Conference. 

He served, as a supply, the Columbia Circuit from December 1904 to the close of 
that Conference year, and was appointed by Bishop Hendrix to the Columbia Circuit 
September, 1905. 

He has taken twenty-seven members into the church. "The Cure of Souls" by 
Ian McLaren has impressed him, and he believes the Christian College is of value 
both to church and state, inasmuch as such a college develops Christian manhood 
and womanhood. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



145 




REV- LUTHER CARLISLE MAGGART. 



I would the great world grew like thee, 
Who grewest not alone in power 
And knowledge, but by year and hour 

In reverence and in charity. — Tennyson. 



Rev. Luther Carlisle Maggart was born, August 8th, 1869, at Milan, Sullivan 
County, Missouri. He is the son of the Rev. W. C. Maggart and Sarah Elizabeth 
Maggart, both of whom were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
He was converted in November, 1890, at St. Charles, Missouri, in a meeting con- 
ducted by the Rev. W. H. Lewis, D. D., and it was his personal appeal that led 
Brother Maggart to Christ. He was licensed to preach, August 22nd, 1892, by the 
Quarterly Conference of the St. Charles District; Rev. W C. Maggart, preacher in 
charge, and Rev. Geo. W. Penn, Presiding Elder. He was recommended to the Annual 
Conference by the same Quarterly Conference at the same time, and was received into 
the Annual Conference in September, 1892, at Montgomery City, Missouri; Rev. Geo. 
W. Penn, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Charles B. Galloway, presiding. He was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop W. W. Duncan, September 15th, 1895, at Macon City, 
Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop Warren A. Candler, September 4th, 1898, at 
Memphis, Missouri. He has served the following appointments: Saverton Circuit, 
1892-1893; Glasgow Circuit, 1893-1894; Memphis Circuit, 1894-1895; Brashear Cir- 
cuit, 1895-1896; Atlanta Circuit, 1896-1899; LaPlata, 1899-1900; Queen City Circuit, 
1900-1902; Clarksville Circuit, 1902-1905; New Franklin Circuit, 1905-1907. He has 
received about six hundred persons into the church under his ministry. He built a 
beautiful church on the Glasgow Circuit, began one at Elmwood, and purchased a 
parsonage at Atlanta, Missouri, and repaired a parsonage or church house on each 
charge he has served. He built the new brick church at Eolia, Missouri. His educa- 
tion was received at Breckenridge, Chiliicothe, and St. Charles College. He was 
married to Miss Esther C. Zumwalt, October 12th, 1893. Brother Maggart, himself 
the son of a Methodist preacher, has grown in his love of Methodist doctrine and 
usage. He is loyal to the church committed to his care, and labors zealously to pro- 
mote the interests of all the organized boards of the church. He is a reader of good 
books and keeps abreast with the best things in literature. He is ready for the 
educational campaign which is to mark the Methodism of Missouri in 1907. 



146 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- NICHOLAS FRANKLIN MATHEWS. 



I seek two things in this world, Truth and Love; whosoever 
Assists me in this search is a friend indeed. — John Wesley. 



Rev. Nicholas Franklin Math- 
ews was born October 3rd, 1862, 
near Chillicothe, Livingston 
County, Missouri. He is a son 
of Stephen B. Mathews and 
Mary H. Mathews. His father 
is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, and 
his mother belongs to the Chris- 
tian Church. He was converted 
in January, 1885, in Zion Bap- 
tist Church near his old home 
in Livingston County, under 
the ministry of Rev. Bane. He 
was convicted of sin about 1875, 
under the preaching of Rev. M, 
N. Allen, but did not fully sur- 
render and confess Christ until 
1885. Year by year his path- 
way grows brighter, his heart 
is fixed and he knows in whom 
he has believed. He loves every- 
body and desires their good, and 
loves God supremely. He was 
first licensed to preach by the 
Missionary Baptists, April 15th, 
1890. In May, 1893, he was 
received into the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, at 
Central Chapel, on the Spring 
Hill Circuit, Gallatin District; 
Rev. W. C. Rice, pastor, and 
Rev. W. A. Hanna, Presiding 
Elder. He was recommended to- 
the Annual Conference for ad- 
mission on trial by the Quar- 
terly Conference of Chillicothe 
• , • , ,, . . ., in August, 1894, and was re- 

ceived into the Annual Conference on trial in September, 1894, at Carrollton, Missouri; 
S e I' *i • jT" 1 ' Pressing Elder, and Bishop Eugene R. Hendrix, presiding. He 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop 0. P. Fitzgerald September 5th, 1897, at Albany, Mis- 
S" 1; °J- ine • E1 T T er , by Bish °P Alpheus W. Wilson September 7th, 1902, at Chilli- 
cotne, Missouri. He has served the following appointments : Green Castle, one 
year; tfraymer, two years; Excello, one year; Memphis Circuit, one year; Atlanta, 
one year; Downing, two years; Brashear, three years; Queen City, one year; his 
present work is Clark and Cooper. Between two hundred and fifty and three hundred 
persons nave united with the church under his ministry. Under his pastorates the 
parsonage at Green Castle was built, and a church enterprise started, and a one-half 
interest held by the Baptists in a church at Downing, Missouri, was also bought. He 
received his education m the public schools and at Avalon College. He was married 
He p i ™ .u ra Ga £ n September 25th, 1888, and their children are, Le Etta Math- 
tu a Sr Mathews, Wesley Mathews, Cramer Mathews, Mae Mathews, Fae Mathews, 
Madge Mathews, Fern Mathews and Vern Mathews. He says that possibly the most 
Q™? -* ir cris ! s . m *"s life was when he decided to follow the dictates of the Holy 
bpirit calling him to the ministry. Some of the books, aside from the Bible, which 
nave neiped him most, are Watson's Institutes, "In His Steps," "Kept for the Mas- 
ters use, and Pilgrim's Progress." Brother Mathews says the Christian College 
sends out better citizens than any other school, and the progress of the nation, 
as well as the church, depends largely on the wise management of our Christian. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



147 




REV. SAMUEL MARVIN WILLIAMS. 



Man's responsiveness to God is the true glory of his being. 

— Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. Samuel Marvin Williams was born April 27th, 1868, in Pike County, Mis- 
souri. He is a son of Jacob Williams and Susan M. Williams, both of whom were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted in November, 
1890, and joined the church at New Harmony, Missouri. He was converted under 
the ministry of Dr. T. E. Sharp, during a revival in which he was assisted by Rev. 
0. B. Holliday. His conversion took place in his room. Deeply penitent he took up 
his Bible and opened it at the twenty-seventh Psalm, and while reading this precious 
Psalm his heart was suddenly filled with gladness and his sorrow turned to joy. His 
growth in grace has come gradually and his strength has increased with service. 
He has a deeper love and a stronger determination to do God's wilf, and His pres- 
ence is ever precious to him. He "was licensed to preach in April, 1903, by the St. 
Charles District Conference at Troy, Missouri; Rev. M. F. Crowe, pastor, and Rev. 
Willis Carlisle, Presiding Elder. He was recommended to the Annual Conference 
by the same District Conference that granted him license to preach; and was re- 
ceived into the Annual Conference in 1903, at Mexico, Missouri; Rev. Willis Carlisle, 
Presiding Elder, and Bishop Galloway presiding. His first work was the Asbury 
church in Chariton County during the conference year of 1903-1904. Since that time 
he has served no charge, but devoted all his time to his studies in school, until this 
last year he served the Fayette Circuit in connection with his school work. He is 
now finishing his junior year at Central College, taking the classical course. He was 
married to Miss Nannie Lewis in 1892. Brother Williams is a reader of the best 
authors, and he makes good use of his reading. He is studious in his habits, careful 
m preparation for the pulpit, and pleasing in his delivery of the sermon. Withal 
he is a student of human nature, and excels in administration. 



148 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. WILLIAM SHORES. 



It is conceded that, of all the springs of conduct, the most 
Powerful and enduring is Example. — Dr. D. R. McAnally. 



By Mr. James B. Shores. 

Rev. William Shores, a pio- 
neer minister of the Gospel, was 
born in Georgia, June, 1796. 
When he was six years old, his 
parents moved to Tennessee, 
and settled near Nashville. He 
was left an orphan when only 
a lad, and was apprenticed to 
learn a trade. His foster-par- 
ents treated him badly, assign- 
ing him to tasks, and imposing 
burdens that were too great for 
one of his age. These, with 
many unkindnesses shown him, 
tended however to bring out and 
develop those essential qualities 
so necessary to true moral and 
physical manhood. In early 
life he was converted and joined 
the Methodist Episcopal Church 
and soon thereafter was licensed 
to preach. He was an active 
minister of the Missouri Annual 
Conference when it embraced 
all of Missouri and parts of 
Iowa, Illinois, and Arkansas. 
Some of the circuits he trav- 
eled covered more territory than 
many districts do at the present 
time. Devout, consecrated, and 
with a burning desire for the 
salvation of souls and the suc- 
cess of his Master's Kingdom, 
he climbed mountains, crossed 
prairies, swam rivers, suffered 
privations, endured hardships 
and overcame difficulties that he 
might be God's servant in lead- 
ing the people to Christ. While preaching in Arkansas, he swam his horse three 
times in one day in getting to an appointment, then preached to the people while 
the water dripped from his clothing, having no change of raiment. Religious services 
were held in private houses, which were usually built of rough, unhewn logs. These 
houses were few and far apart. The settlements were often thirty miles apart, and 
nothing but blazes on the trees to indicate the way, there being no roads. On one 
occasion, when tire day was dark and dreary on account of continuous rain, he lost 
his way and was compelled to spend the night in the wilderness, while bears growled, 
wolves howled and panthers screamed around him. Bold, fearless, gifted in prayer 
and full of faith and the Holy Ghost, no wonder he succeeded. At the Conference 
held at the Fayette Campground in Howard County, in 1828, he was granted a 
location at his own request, his means being exhausted and his health beginning to 
fail. In September, 1829, he was married to Miss Susan R. Johnson. Eight child- 
ren were the fruit of this union. Rev. J. F. Shores, a sketch of whose life appears 
elsewhere in this volume, being one of them. Brother Shores settled on a farm near 
Fayette, and did much good for his Master as a local preacher. He died in his 
seventy-sixth year, honored, respected and loved by his family and a host of friends, 
and went home to be with his Lord. 

"Servant of God well done, 

The battle's fought, the victory won." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



149 



REV- JOHN FLETCHER SHORES. 



Christian workers shall never quit their thrones; they shall 
Reign forever and ever. — Dr. Talmage. 



Rev. John Fletcher Shores 
was born September 4th, 1833, 
in Howard County, Missouri. 
He is a son of Rev. William 
Shores and Susan Rice Shores. 
Both parents were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He was converted in 
Howard County, Missouri, at 
Bethel Camp Ground in 1850, 
under the ministry of Rev. A. 
Monroe, and others. He had 
joined the church a year previ- 
ous to this time, however, under 
the ministry of Rev. B. H. Spen- 
cer. After having been an ear- 
nest seeker for religion for one 
whole year, his conversion was 
sudden. The influence of his 
father, mother and oldest sister 
was instrumental in his conver- 
sion. He had a license to exhort 
about seven months before he was 
licensed to preach, but never 
tried to exhort but twice. He 
was licensed to preach by the 
Rocheport Quarterly Conference, 
Rev. Tyson Dines, Presiding El- 
der; this same Quarterly Con- 
ference recommended him to the 
Annual Conference, September 
2nd, 1858, and he was received 
into the Annual Conference in 
1858; Rev. Tyson Dines, Presid- 
ing Elder, and Bishop John 
Early, presiding. He was or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop H. H. 
Kavanaugh, September 16th, 
I860, at St. Charles, Missouri; was ordained Elder by Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh, 
August 20th, 1865, at Hannibal, Missouri. He served the following appointments: 
Green Castle Circuit, Memphis Circuit, Junior preacher on Shelbyville Circuit, Albany 
Circuit, New Franklin Circuit; appointed to Gallatin Circuit, but did not go to it 
on account of war excitement; Mexico Circuit, Gallatin Circuit, Nebraska City Station, 
Savannah District, Keytesville Circuit, Norborne Circuit, Brunswick Station, Stur- 
geon Circuit, Clarksville Circuit, Montgomery City Circuit, Liberty Circuit, Keytes- 
ville Circuit, Salisbury Circuit, Ashland Circuit, Prairie Hill Circuit, Chillicothe Dis- 
trict. He received about five hundred and twenty-five persons into the church. Under 
his pastorate eight churches were built, and he assisted in purchasing and paying for 
several parsonages. He attended Howard High School, the Rev. William T. Luckey and 
Dr. Carr W. Pritchett being two of his instructors. He was married to Mrs. Alice Lar- 
zelere, October 20th, 1868, and they had one child, Frank V. Shores, who died in 
infancy. Brother Shores entered into rest, February 6th, 1905, and is buried at 
Brunswick, Missouri. 




150 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




MR. G. G. SUDZUKI. 



Mr. Sudzuki was educated at Central College, Fayette, Missouri, and is one of 
our brightest graduates. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 



151 




MR. CLAUD MARION RICHMOND. 



Walking in the light, we shall receive increase of illumination; 
Thankful for the morning dawn, we shall see the noontide splen- 
dor. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Mr. Claud Marion Richmond was born in Moundville, Vernon County, Missouri, 
August 29th, 1876. At the age of five his parents moved to Western Texas and at 
the age of nine he entered one of the grammar schools of Abilene, Texas. In June, 
1886, in company with his mother and sister, he returned to Moundville, Missouri, where 
the family remained awhile in town and later moved on a farm for a year near 
Schell City, Missouri, and then came back to a farm adjoining Moundville. Mr. Rich- 
mond in September, 1894, left home for Morrisville College where he spent two years 
in study. The year '96-'97 he spent on the farm and part time in his father's store. 
Having decided to go into business, September 29th, 1897, he left to enter Spalding s 
Commercial College, Kansas City. In August, the following year, he returned home 
for a short time. In February, 1899, he was called to accept a position as stenogra- 
pher for a large dry goods wholesale house in St. Joseph, Missouri. He remained here 
until August, when feeling the call to go into Christian work, he decided to finish 
his college work at Morrisville, but September, 1900, he decided to enter Central 
College, where he remained three years, lacking a half year's work finishing the A -H. 
course. Mr. Richmond was an enthusiastic Aristotelian and Y. M. C. A. man. He 
made the foot ball team '00, '01 and '02. Won the mile run in '02 and the halt-mile 
run in '01. Mr. Richmond was active in the social and religious life of the college. 
In December, 1901, he decided, while at the State Convention of the Young Mens 
Christian Association at Columbia, to go into Association work as a life work. Octo- 
ber 1st, 1903, he went to Chicago to enter Y. M. C. A. Institute and Training School 
and finishing his course at the summer term at Lake Geneva m July, 1905, he re- 
turned to South McAlester, I. T., where his parents had moved. 

September 26th, he received a call to be Social Work Director of the San * rancisco- 
Young Men's Christian Association, where he remained until he was called as Assistant 
Secretary at San Jose. Here the earthquake changed his future and September l&tn 
he was called as the Boys' Work Director of the Pasadena (Cal.) Young Men s 
Christian Association. Mr. Richmond is having great success with the boys ol Pasa- 
dena but still has a very warm place in fiis heart for dear old Central, and nis class* 
mates who are scattered from gulf to lakes and coast to coast. 



152 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




FAYETTE DISTRICT PARSONAGE, MISSOURI CONFERENCE. 



The Missouri Conference stands eighteenth in the list of membership, and in the 
number of Presiding Elders, sixteenth in traveling preachers and value of parsonages, 
fourteenth in parsonages, fifteenth in churches, and eleventh in value, and twelfth in 
missions. Of the forty-six conferences, the Missouri and South West Missouri are the 
only large conferences without a district parsonage. Such institutions do not seem to 
grow in Missouri. The day of blanks in this column in the minutes has passed. Two 
enterprises are now on the way. The St. Charles District has such an enterprise on 
the way. In March, 1905, the Fayette District Conference discussed the Presiding 
Elder's home, and decided to secure one. W W Gray undertook the work of securing 
enough money to make a start. He raised a subscription of $1,200 in Fayette, and 
the remaining $1,800 was apportioned to the various charges in the district. The prop- 
erty was contracted for in September, 1906, and the deed passed into the hands of the 
trustees May 9, 1907, when $2,000 was paid on the property. The remaining $1,000 
is being collected in and the property will be kept in excellent condition. The location 
is one block from Centenary Chapel and Central College, and two blocks from Howard- 
Payne. The building and grounds are large, well arranged, with fruit and outbuild- 
ings. It will be a relief to the man appointed to the Fayette District the first of 
September to know that a home is waiting for him even though he is going to a school 
town where rent is high and houses, at that season of the year, extremely scarce. It 
is difficult to understand why the church in Missouri has been totally unconcerned in 
all the past about homes for the nine men who have traveled her districts. They have 
labored for the full payment of preachers' salaries and the benevolences, and for par- 
sonages and churches. So many interests have been involved that the Presiding Elders 
themselves have hesitated to make an appeal for homes for themselves. The present 
time is so full of possibility that every district should see that a district parsonage 
is begun. 

The first Board of Trustees for the property is composed of the following men: 
A. F. Davis (since deceased, and succeeded by his son, Murray F. Davis), W. W Gray 
G. W Dimmitt and E. W. Rucker of Fayette and L. S. Harlan of Clifton Hill, John 
J. Walkup of Armstrong, and J. A. Stewart of Columbia. 

The property will be kept in repair by assessing an additional one hundred dollars 
per annum on the Presiding Elder's salary and collected along with that fund and paid 
into the bank by him. The entire district will thus be interested directly in the main- 
tenance of the property. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— FAYETTE DISTRICT. 153 



REV HIRAM D. GROVES. 

Rev. Hiram D. Groves was born in Andrew County, Missouri, November 19th, 
1845; died in the hospital in Kansas City, Mo., November 16th, 1905. His remains 
were taken to Fayette, Mo., where he was buried November 19th, his sixtieth birthday. 
He was converted and called to the ministry in early life. He was a very useful 
man in the itinerancy; diligent, earnest, painstaking, he was ever successful in his 
Master's work. Gracious results followed inevitably the efforts of such a man. He 
entered Central College in April, 1868, in order to prepare himself for his work; here 
he remained for over three years pursuing the Classical Course. He joined the Mis- 
soui Conference in 1871, of which he remained an honored member to the end of 
his life. 

He was married September 10th, 1872, to Miss Anna Bratton, who was a help- 
meet indeed, and she joyously shared with him all the burdens and triumphs of his 
laborious and useful life. 

In 1888, Dr. H. K. Hinde, having resigned the presidency of Howard Female 
College, Brother Groves was chosen by the Board of Curators as his successor. 

While devoted to the itinerant work, he consented to assume this new responsibility, 
and entered with hearty zest into the work, September, 1888. For nearly eighteen 
years he gave the strength of his manhood to the great work of Christian education, 
and eternity alone can reveal the impression for good he made upon the character 
and life of the young women of our land. 

During his administration the name of the school was changed to Howard-Payne 
College, and he was instrumental in enlarging and extensively improving the building. 
Success crowned his efforts in this work of education, and he was known far and wide 
for his work's sake. 

Central Colelge never had a better friend than in Rev. Hiram D. Groves. His 
portrait appears on page 114, and a poem concerning his death on page 115. 



154 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE. 




WOODSON INSTITUTE. 
Prof. Willis Marvin Board, B. A., President. 



1 806— CENTENNIAL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 



PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



Presiding Elder. 
Plattsburg Station. 
Richmond Station. 
Osborn Circuit. 
Kearney and Lathrop. 
Supernumerary - 
Edgerton Circuit. 
Platte City and Parkville 
Weston and Waldron. 
Millville Circuit. 



• M. L. Gray 

.H. C. McPherson 

.C. B. Duncan 

.A. Snowden 

• J. M. Bone 

.J. T. Kimsey 

W M. Baker 

.C. K. Shilling 

.J. D. Hunt 

.H. I. Cobb 



Hardin Circuit. 
Rayville Circuit. 
Missouri City Circuit. 
Excelsior Springs Station 
Liberty Station. 
Smithville Circuit. 
Kingston Circuit. 
Lawson Station. 
Polo Circuit. 
Cowgill Circuit. 



.E. C. Swann 

W. L. Myers 

W W. Wilson 

.J. H. Hubbard 

R. E. Dickenson 

W. P. Owen 

.J. R. Hedges 

.F. P. Mapel 

.J. W. Budd 

W. N. Giddens 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



155 



REV MARCUS LEMON GRAY. 



The celestial area around the Throne of the Redeemer, for 
Spaces wider than an angel's vision can sweep, will be crowded 
With the purchase of His blood. — Bishop Marvin. 



By Rev. Ward M. Baker. 

Rev. Marcus L. Gray, son of 
Emmanuel Lemon Gray and 
Martha Ellen (Graham) Gray, 
was born eight miles west of 
Shelibyville, Missouri, October 
7th, 1857. He was educated in 
Shelbyville High School, Cen- 
tral College, and Vanderbilt 
University; he became a student 
of books, a strong thinker, and 
continues in the paths of schol- 
arship. The power of a Christ- 
ian home had helped to direct 
his life. In the fall of 1874, 
while on a visit to his uncle, 
J. R. Graham, of Clinton, Ken- 
tucky, he fell under deep con- 
viction of sin, and joined the 
church; finally while in the line 
of duty, as Rev. J. M. Flatt was 
preaching, light from the glory- 
world came into his spirit. Glory 
shone round about on that mem- 
orable day. Life, and life more 
abundant expresses his progress. 
The call to the ministry was 
unmistakably clear. He re- 
ceived Deacon's orders in 1882, 
at Plattsburg, Missouri, and 
Elder's orders in September, 
1885, at Columbia, Missouri; 
both ordinations by Bishop 
Granbery. His appointments 
are as follows: St. Charles, 
Fulton, Aux Vasse, Wellsville, 
Rocheport, Salisbury, Cameron, 
Lineville, Gooding Church, St. 
Joseph, Platte City and Weston, . , » . rxT ^ , 

Cowgill, Chillicothe District, and Plattsburg District. Earnest and faithful work 
has characterized his pastorates. Revivals in each class, missionary zeal, g round ? a 
on knowledge, wise and wide visitation, a clear and strong gospel from the pulpit, 
have been the aims of his ministry. At St. Charles, a $1200.00 parsonage debt was 
paid; $3300.00 was expended at Fulton remodeling the church; a new parsonage was 
built at Wellsville, and everywhere improvement and care of the property placeci unaer 
his pastorate. His admirable system, executive power patience courage, untiring 
energy and zeal have been most clearly shown in the Presiding Eldership, tsy ms 
initiation, faith and perseverance, various building enterprises have been begun or 
carried to completion. Notably, Chillicothe, Milan, Holt, Excelsior Springs and King- 
ston churches. The silver bells ring in the happy anniversary of his marriage to 
Miss Margaret Henton, of Louisville, Missouri. He is a pure man, a consecratea 
Christian, a diligent and sympathetic pastor, a thoughtful and earnest preacner, a wise 
executor, and an untiring worker. May this volume, of which he is the able editor, 
be his lasting memorial. 




156 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. CHARLES BERNARD DUNCAN, A. M. 



A nobler occupation need no man desire than to be a fellow- 
Worker with God. — Dr. Frederick W- Robertson. 



Rev. Charles Bernard Dun- 
can, son of Judge W- H. Dun- 
can and Mary J. Duncan, was 
born February 16th, 1872, near 
Shelbyville, Shelby County, Mis- 
souri. He was converted at 
Duncan Chapel, a church named 
for his grandfather, Mr. Levan 
Duncan, in Shelby County, Mis- 
souri, January 2nd, 1893, under 
the ministry of Rev. V. J. Millis. 
He joined the church at the 
same time and place, and on the 
following night. He was brought 
up under the most wholesome 
influences. His grandfather on 
his mother's side, Mr. William 
0. Lowman, was one of the well 
known Sunday School Superin- 
tendents of Shelby County, Mis- 
souri. Brother Duncan's conver- 
sion grew out of these blessed 
influences. He has made steady 
growth in his knowledge of di- 
vine things. He was licensed to 
preach in April, 1896, at Hig- 
bee, Missouri, by the Fayette 
District Conference; Rev. T. E. 
Sharp, D. D., preacher in charge 
and Rev. J. R. A. Vaughan, 
Presiding Elder; was recommen- 
ded to the Tennessee Annual 
Conference by the Nashville Dis- 
trict Conference; was received 
into the Missouri Annual Con- 
ference, at St. Joseph, Missouri, 
in September, 1901; Rev. C. 

SmbTr ar i r 6th A 190 C an f£ M?* He WaS orddnS i g^^^p E gSl^ 
S~ 16 K th ' 19 ° ' at Fulton, Missouri; was ordained Elder by Bishop E. R. Hen- 

do ntmPiffi fih ?' £?°?-' at ,?S! myra ' Mi s«>«ri. He has served the following ap- 
Eu HpW y ^T' i? 01 " 1904 - He is se ™g his third y^r at Richmond, 
obS\i? P i f med i W ° hundred and seventy-nine persons into the church. He 
Central PnlW f ™ ?« C0Unt 7 Schools of Shelb y Count ^ Shelbyville Academy, 

derbHt Un^fStv ^ ? r • he / raduated ™ June, 1898, with A. B. Degree, and Van! 
H 1 ?Z f^Jri graduatln S fro . m th at institution in June, 1901, with B. D. Degree, 
mmistrv th P S "i f conversion and the decision made at that time to enter the 
£ nulnTt adrCf ^ m P° rtan V crisl l.°f his lif e- Rev. Charles B. Duncan is pleasant 
follow P hinfwftl;i! consecu 4 lve thl n nk er, and felicitous in expression. His auditors 
sermonicThoT^hf^ T£ u He / eads th ^ best books and studies them. His line of 
he™SSuthtfn?«n3 hl ? h f ?rder, and of the most helpful character. As a pastor 
work of the churPb C0 T n 1 f cle ; tl0U , s - Naturally, he is interested in the great educational 

^this^sh^wnrnoi to^^t^T** ^ ° f ***' ^^ ^^ DunCan ' BUd 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



157 



MR. HARRY P WOODSON. 



One of the Credentials of the Christian Religion is that it has a 
Sane bearing on our human lives and living. — Dr. William A. 
Quayle. 

By Rev. Chas. B. Duncan, A. M. 
Mr. Harry P. Woodson, son 
of Thomas D. and Sabina L. 
(Hughes) Woodson, was born 
at Kingston, Missouri, March 
23, 1859. In early childhood 
his parents removed to Rich- 
mond, Missouri, where practi- 
cally all of his subsequent life 
has been spent. He was edu- 
cated in the Richmond Public 
schools and the Missouri State 
University. After completing 
his education he engaged in Ihe 
mercantile business for a rhort 
time in Carrollton, returning to 
Richmond he formed a part- 
nership with Mr. W H. Dar- 
neal in the same business under 
the firm name of Woodson & 
Darneal. In the spring of 1905 
he retired from the firm. He 
is at present connected with 
the Ray County Savings Bank, 
but devotes the greater part of 
his time to the management of 
the large financial interests 
under his control. Sound and 
discriminating in judgment, 
honest and conscientious in all 
transactions, active and keenly 
alert toward every opportunity 
he has a very successful busi- 
ness career. 

He was converted and united 
with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, at Carrollton in 
November, 1879. He has ren- 
dered efficient service to the , 
church in almost every field open to laymen. For a number of years he has been 
both steward and trustee of the local church. Eleven years of faithful service nave 
been given to the Sunday School as Superintendent. A number of times he has been 
a delegate to both District and Annual Conference. His brethren also honored him 
by electing him delegate to the last General Conference which met at Birmingham, 
Alabama, in May, 1906. Church Extension and Christian Education, those interests 
of the church which were so ably fostered by his father, the late T D. Woodson, have 
especially appealed to the son. He has for some time been a valued memoer ot tne 
Conference Board of Church Extension, while the success of Woodson Institute has 
been due in no small measure to his abiding interest and wise counsels. While busny 
engaged with the present day work of the church he has his face toward the luture. 
He has broad and comprehensive views of the mission and work of the church ana 
is a close student of the great movements that are shaping her destiny. 

November 16, 1881, he was married to Miss Stella H. Galtney of Yazoo Uty, 
Mississippi, who has contributed her full share to the building of their Christian 
home. They have four children, Dr. Thomas D. Woodson, James R. Woodson, Ulara 
Galtney Woodson and Harry P, Woodson, Jr. Few parents have had clearer con- 
ceptions of the responsibilities growing out of the relation of parent to child ana 
few have more faithfully and conscientiously tried to meet these obligations, as a 
reward for their work of faith and labor of love they have seen all their children 
become Christians in childhood. , .„ „ ,, „ „ A 

In his church life in Richmond, he is officially associated with Brothers Geo A. 
Hughes, Prof. G. B. Grumbine, J. K. Joiner, J. J. Riley, A. B. Conrow, b. L. tfay, 
C W Dawson, and John E. Hill. 




158 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- JOSEPH THOMAS DEVLIN. 



I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have 
Kept the Faith.— St. Paul. 

Rev. Joseph Thomas Dev- 
lin was born in Sussex 
County, Delaware, in 1811, 
and died at Lawson, Mis- 
souri, October 21th, 1878, ana ib 
buried at Richmond, Missouri. 
His father, Patrick Devlin, was 
a Catholic, and his mother, Mar- 
garet Devlin, an Episcopalian. 
He was converted when fourteen 
years of age at Wilmington, 
Delaware, and joined the church 
at once. He always connected 
the recollection of his awaken- 
ing and conversion with that of 
the sickness and death of a sis- 
ter three years younger than 
himself, and regarded that mel- 
ancholy occurrence as being 
used by the Father of all for 
the accomplishment of his con- 
version. No thought, so far as 
man could discover, ever entered 
his mind, save his duty to his 
Maker and his fellow-men. We 
never knew so good a man; 
never saw one who seemed so 
burdened with the care of souls 
as he, and never saw a man 
whose life was so completely 
devoted to the cause of his Mas- 
ter. His Christian character 
will grow brighter ?nd brighter 
through the cycles of time, and 
will be perpetuated, elevated and 
glorified in eternity. He was 
licensed as a local preacher near 
Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1837; 
Rev. William Mack, being the Presiding Elder; he was recommended to the Annual 
Conference by Rev. Glanville and Rev. Caples, and received into the Annual Conference 
at Columbia, Missouri, October 7th, 1845. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Soule, 
at Columbia, Missouri, October 7th, 1845; ordained Elder by Bishop W. Capers, 
at Glasgow, Missouri, October 3rd, 1847. He served the following appointments: 
Plattsburg Circuit, 1845-1846; Cravensville Mission, 1847-1848; Richmond Circuit, 
1849-1850; Carrollton Circuit, 1851-1852; Platte City Circuit, 1853-1854; Savannah 
Circuit, 1855-1856; Plattsburg Circuit, 1857-1858; Richmond Circuit, 1859-1860; Mill- 
ville Circuit, 1861-1862; in 1863 he was supernumerary; Spring Hill Circuit, 1864- 
1865; Carrollton Circuit, 1866-1868; Platte City Circuit, 1869-1870; Plattsburg Cir- 
cuit, 1871-1872; Liberty Circuit, 1873-1874; New Market Circuit, 1875-1876; Haynes- 
ville, Circuit, 1877-1878. His preaching was not in the words of man's wisdom, 
but in the power and demonstration of the Holy Spirit. Scores, hundreds, and may 
we not say, thousands, of happy, redeemed souls will appear in Heaven as his witnesses, 
and will be shining stars in his crown of rejoicing forever. No man can number the 
souls he brought into the fold, nor estimate the extent of his labors. The following 
churches were built under his pastorate: Richmond, Carrollton, Todd's Chapel and 
Plattsburg. He received his education in the public schools and at night school in 
Wilmington. Delaware. He was married to Miss Sarah Ann Cable, April 3rd, 1834, 
and the following children were born to them: Mary Devlin, Charles Devlin, Julia 
Devlin (Mrs. J. W. Shotwell), Lucetta Devlin, Joseph H. Devlin, Fannie Devlin (Mrs. 
F. W Joy), Ella Devlin (Mrs. D. F. Bone), Horace G. Devlin and Wakefield Devlin. 
Only three of these children are now living, to-wit: Mrs. J. W- Shotwell, Horace G. 
Devlin and Joseph H. Devlin. His wife, Mrs. Sarah A. Devlin, who is now ninety-two 
years old, is living with her daughter, Mrs. J. W. Shotwell, in Richmond, Missouri. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



159 



THOMAS D. WOODSON. 



But he to Heaven was vowed through his industrious life, and 
Christian faith calmed in his soul the fear of change and death. 

— Wordsworth. 



By Rev. Chas. B. Duncan, A. M. 
Thomas D. Woodson, son of 
Robert S. and Hulda Ann 
(Young) Woodson, was born in 
Woodsonville, Hart County, Ken- 
tucky, March 10th, 1828. He 
grew to manhood in his native 
state and received a common 
school education. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Sabina L. Hughes, 
a native of Clark County, Ken- 
tucky, December 5th, 1854. She 
departed this life, April 11th, 
1871. To them three children 
were born — Miss Annie Wood- 
son, Harry P, Woodson and 
Virginia Woodson, wife of Dr. 
Robert Sevier. He died at 
Richmond, Missouri, August 
28th, 1902. Volunteering in 
1847 in the war against Mex- 
ico, he served in the Fourth 
Kentucky Infantry until peace 
was restored, when he came to 
Kingston, Missouri, and en- 
gaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness. After a trip across the 
plains to California he moved 
to Richmond in 1863, where the 
remainder of his life was spent. 
In 1868, he assisted in the or- 
ganization of the Ray County 
Savings Bank, served as its vice 
president for a number of 
years, and was afterwards made 
president. His industry, fru- 
gality, sound judgment, fore- 
sight and integrity secured for 
him the confidence of his asso- 
ciates in business and made him an unusually successful business man. As a citizen 
he took an active interest in public affairs and could always be relied upon to do his 
part in any movement which had for its object the social, moral or religious betterment 
of the community. 

He was converted and united with the Church in the year 1866. At that time 
there was born within him a love for, and interest in his Church and her ministry, 
which was one of the notable characteristics of his after life. Though an active man 
with many business interests he was never too busy for the work of his Church. He 
had been abundantly blessed with this world's goods and as he had freely received, so 
he freely gave. He served his Church faithfully as steward for a number of years 
and the interests of the preacher were always safe in his hands. He had an abiding 
interest in the young life of the Church and for a long time was Superintendent of 
the Sunday School. He continuously represented his district as delegate to the Annual 
Conference until age and failing health compelled him to ask to be relieved of that 
duty. When the Conference Board of Trust was appointed and a suitable man was 
required to manage the sacred funds of the Conference claimants, Brother Woodson 
was selected for that important position. He likewise served for a number of years 
as treasurer of the Conference Board of Church Extension. These funds he adminis- 
tered as a sacred trust and it was his invariable rule to give them preference over his 
own, many times even at a financial loss to himself. 

He was very much interested in Christian education. When the Plattsburg District 
built a secondary school at Richmond he was the most liberal contributor and the school 
was named Woodson Institute in his honor. 




160 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. WARD McKIM BAKER, B.D. 



The Church still blesses him who for her service cares. — Goethe. 



Rev. Ward McKim Baker was 
born in Callaway County, Mis- 
souri, May 4th, 1870, on a farm. 
He is a son of Dr. John Samuel 
Baker and Adela N. Baker. His 
father was a member of the 
Presbyterian Church, and his 
mother is a Methodist. He was 
converted and joined the Church 
at Fulton, Missouri, under the 
ministry of Rev. John A. Bea- 
gle, in April, 1886. Always 
knowing and believing in Christ 
Jesus, he had given no close 
thought to the matter of per- 
sonal acceptance of Christ un- 
til one Sunday morning Brother 
Monroe asked him if he did not 
think he should be saved. The 
thought found lodgment in his 
heart and the following Tues- 
day evening at the sacred altar 
of the old two-story church he 
found personal acceptance. Re- 
newed assurance and the witness 
of the Holy Spirit have come to 
him, and he has had visions of 
God along the way. Peace, com- 
fort and strength and more are 
his to-day. Temptations very 
strong have beset his way, but 
he has triumphed thus far. He 
knows in whom he has believed. 
He was licensed to preach De- 
cember 11th, 1888, by the Quar- 
terly Conference of West End 
Church, Nashville, Tennessee; 
Rev. Walker Lewis, D.D., 
preacher in charge, and Rev. Robert A. Young, D.D., Presiding Elder; was recom- 
mended to the Annual Conference by the Quarterly Conference of the Mexico District, 
August 7th, 1890, and was received into the Annual Conference that year at Fayette, 
Missouri; Rev. John A. Mumpower, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Key, presiding. 
He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Charles B. Galloway, in 1892, at Montgomery 
City, Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, in 1894, at Carrollton, Mis- 
souri. He has served the following charges: Boone County Mission, 1890-1891; 
Excello Circuit, 1891-1892; Macon Circuit, 1892-1893; Marceline and Bucklin, 1893- 
1895; La Plata, 1895-1896; Callao, 1896-1898; Milan, 1898-1902; De Witt, 1892-1893; 
Brunswick, 1893-1895; Edgerton, 1895-1897. He has received about three hundred 
and fifty persons into the Church. The church at Milan was built under his pastorate. 
He attended Fulton High School, from which he graduated in 1883; Westminster 
College, Fulton, graduating from that institution in 1888, with B.S. degree; two years 
of classical theological course, regular B.D. course, at Vanderbilt University, with 
highest commendations from Dean Tillett. He was married to Miss Frances Maud 
Belshe, at La Plata, Missouri, June 3rd, 1896, and two children have blessed their 
home, Florence Adela Baker and Robert Luther Baker. He says he believes that the 
visits of pastors to his home in earliest childhood was the strongest influence, outside 
of home, on his life. He was always blessed with the best of instruction in Sunday 
School. Under the classical shades of the beautiful Vanderbilt Campus, he had his 
final struggle for a surrender to God's will to enter the ministry. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



161 




JUDGE WILLIAM LAWSON CULVER. 

The truest statesmanship is that which seeks to find the plan of 
God. — Bishop Candler. 

By Rev. Ward M. Baker. 
Judge William L. Culver was born in Kentucky, November 6th, 1835. His parents, 
R. E. Culver and Mary A. Culver, came to Missouri in pioneer days and settled in 
Clinton County, Missouri. The mother, now past ninety years of age, lives with nel- 
son, and is an ardent Presbyterian. He attended the Masonic College at Lexington, 
Missouri, and is a man of fine natural ability, well-read and cultured in mind and heart, 
he has many of the best books in his library, and a meritorious work especially from a 
Southern author, he eagerly purchases. He married Miss Virginia McMichael, daugh- 
ter of the highly respected Thomas McMichael, of Plattsburg, Missouri. They walked 
in congenial companionship for eighteen years, and had around them a family ol 
children, four of whom are living: Judge R. E. Culver, a prominent attorney of 
St. Joseph; Thomas M. Culver, a horticulturist of Southwest Missouri; Paul M. 
Culver, the owner of a fine stock farm, in Clinton County, Missouri, and Mrs W. A. 
James, of Lawson, Missouri. Charles M. Culver, third son of Judge Culver, Hved to 
manhood and his family resides in Plattsburg. Twenty-five years ago Judge Culver 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary B. Bland, his present companion. orabont 
fifty years Brother Culver has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He has amassed a comfortable fortune, and it has been his pleasure to admin- 
ister in financial things to his Church. He is a man of prayer and has been stewara 
and Sunday School Superintendent for many years. He has been a member ol the 
Board of Curators of Central College for Women, at Lexington, Missouri, and Wood- 
son Institute, at Richmond, Missouri. A frequent delegate to the District and Annual 
Conference, he has ever endeavored to attend and be of service. He is devout, earnest, 
faithful, conscientious and spiritual. He has been active m political life and stanas 
firm for right issues. He has presided over the County Court of Clinton bounty 
for two terms of four years each. We delight to honor our laymen who, like our 
brother, have stood as the mainstays and support of our local churches. 



162 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV HUGH CORVILLE McPHERSON, A.M. 



He was made not only to know, and reason, and feel, but to 
Achieve. — Bishop Marvin. 



Joseph S. and Phoebe Ann McPherson, the parents of Hugh C. McPherson, were 
old-time Methodists, living near Jonesville, Lee County, Virginia, where Hugh was 
born, October 4th, 1865. While teching school, he was converted near Albany, Mis- 
souri, in 1889. That year he entered Central College, and joined the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, at Fayette, in January, 1890. Having decided to enter the min- 
istry, he was licensed to preach by the Fayette Quarterly Conference the same year; 
Rev. W. F. Packard, D.D., P.C., and Rev. J. H. Ledbetter, P.E. He remained in 
Central College, graduating in 1894. Soon after graduation the Quarterly Conference 
at Fayette recommended him to the Missouri Annual Conference for admission. How- 
ever, he was received into the Southwest Missouri Conference in the fall of 1894; 
Bishop E. R. Hendrix, presiding, Rev. W. C. Bewley, P.E., presenting his credentials. 
He was ordained Deacon at Webb City, September, 1896, by Bishop W W. Duncan, 
and ordained Elder by Bishop W. A. Candler at Lexington, Mo., in September, 1898. 
His appointments have been as follows: Seneca, 1894, 1895, 1896; Mt. Vernon, 1897; 
Scarritt Collegiate Institute as Professor, 1898; transferred to St. Louis Conference 
and appointed to Marvin Memorial, 1899. He was married to Miss Annie E. Howard 
of Hazelhurst, Mississippi, August 23rd, 1899. They have one son, Howard D. In 
September, 1900, he transferred to the Missouri Conference and was appointed to 
Louisiana, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903; Troy, 1904, 1905; Plattsburg, 1906. 

Thus far he has received over three hundred souls into the fellowship of the 
Church of Christ. He built a church at Seneca, Missouri, and one at Mt. Vernon, 
Missouri. He built the parsonage at Louisiana, Missouri, and the one at Troy, Mis- 
souri. The parting of the ways came to him when he finally and fully decided to 
preach the Gospel. Lonely and dissatisfied, he decided to test Jesus and his power to 
direct his life. He has been a reader of good books, such as Wesley's Sermons, 
Christus-Auctor, Munsey's Sermons, and many others. He thinks that if the Chris- 
tian College declines, the Church is destined to weaken. Even the state must have 
men of hearts as well as heads. The Christian College promises both. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



163 



MR. THOMAS McMICHAEL. 



It is our wisdom to accept our own existence with gratitude, 
And to strive after the high ends proposed to us by the Creator.— 

Bishop Marvin. 

By Rev. D. R. Shackelford. 
I first became acquainted with 
Thomas McMichael in Platts- 
burg, Missouri, in the autumn 
of 1868. I was sent to Platts- 
burg Circuit in September of 
that year, and on my arrival 
there, among the first brethren 
I met was Thomas McMichael. 
The four leading men in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, in Plattsburg at that 
time, were Nathan Vance, 
Thomas McMichael, Abraham 
and George Funkhouser. They 
were all men of means and 
strong friends and supporters of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. There were many other 
faithful men and women in 
Plattsburg beside the above 
named. I am entirely unin- 
formed as to the early life of 
our brother. The very brief 
data furnished me simply said 
that Thomas McMichael was 
born in Xenia, Green County, 
Ohio, May 22nd, 1810; that he 
was married to Miss Hannah 
Morgan of Mt. Jackson, Shenan- 
doah County, Virginia, October 
4th, 1836. Thomas McMichael 
and wife settled in Plattsburg, 
Clinton County, Missouri, about 
the year 1840, where they resid- 
ed the remainder of their lives. 
Here they reared their family of 
five sons and two daughters, and 
here they found sepulture. This 

latter date brought them face to face with the stern realities of frontier life, 
and perhaps no man wielded a stronger or happier influence in moulding society 
for good, and establishing the prosperity of that town and county than did Thomas 
McMichael and family and those who co-operated with them. He was enterprising 
m business, and God blessed him with an ample store of this world's goods. He 
adopted two Scriptural axioms: (1) "To be diligent in business, fervent in spirit, 
serving the Lord," and (2) "To do justly, love mercy and walk humbly with God." 
He reminded me of some of the Old Testament Patriarchs in the generousness and 
grace of his hospitality. There was in him a cordiality toward his pastors that was 
very charming. He was one of the most correctly thoughtful laymen I ever had the 
privilege of knowing. He was a man of great common sense and thought, and had 
gathered a valuable store of knowledge from reading good books. Thus equipped, 
he was a valuable help to his pastor and the Church. His piety was of a deep and 
solid cast and drew its life and inspiration from the word of God and close vital 
communion with Him. My work carried me away from him in his later years, so 
that I cannot speak as I would of his ripening for the life that is to come. His home 
life was to me most charming. He occupied his proper rank in the heart and conduct 
of his wife and children. His affection for them was of the most beautiful type and 
theirs alike for him. Late in life the loss of his youngest son, Thomas, Jr., at the age 
of seven or eight years was much like the loss of Joseph to Jacob, and then the early 
death of his younger daughter, Josephine, one of the lovliest young ladies I ever knew, 
was a sore bereavement; so that there was a tinge of sadness in his language and 
manner afterward. But I feel sure that out of it all the Lord brought him by His 
grace and kept his life hidden with Him above. He was a man of strong character 
and of decided convictions and experience *as a Christian. He was certainly one of 
the most consistent and influential Christians I ever knew. 




164 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




LIBERTY CHURCH. 



Rev. R. E. Dickenson, Pastor. 

This church was built under the pastorate of Rev. Howard L. Davis. This gives 
us a good church building at Liberty. The official Board, 1907, is made up as follows: 
Dr. R. E. Sevier, John Lindau, J. W. Harrison, Dr. F. H. Mathews, Judge L. G. 
Hopkins, Hon. Martin E. Lawson, W- B. Strong, Rev. H. C. Hankins. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



165 



REV- ROBERT EDWARD DICKENSON, A.M., B.D. 



What possibilities appear in our natures since we see what 
Christ made of it. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. R. E. Dickenson, son of 
Robert W and Catharine J. 
Dickenson, was born at Cross 
Timbers, Hickory County, Mis- 
souri, September 4th, 1875. 
When nine years of age his 
mother died, but not without 
leaving a profound impression 
upon his young life. Before go- 
ing away she exacted a promise 
from him that he would meet 
her in Heaven. In times of 
doubt this incident in his early 
life has served as an anchor. 

In a few years his father mar- 
ried Miss Mattie R. Davis, a sis- 
ter of Rev. L. H. Davis, of the 
St. Louis Conference, and this 
good woman has been a genuine 
mother to him during all these 
years. 

He attended the public schools 
until seventeen years of age, 
when he entered Morrisville 
College. Already a member of 
the Church, having joined in 
the summer of 1890 at home 
during the pastorate of Rev. W 
K. White, he found most con- 
genial surroundings at college, 
and during the first year was 
licensed to preach. An uncle on 
the maternal side, Rev. John F. 
Williams, a useful preacher in 
the Baptist Church, being a 
very devout man, no doubt had 
something to do in helping to 
mold the young life for a call to 
the ministry. Spending five years in Morrisville College, he graduated with the degree 
A.B. in the spring of 1897. In the autumn of the same year, he entered the Theological 
Department of Vanderbilt University, where he spent three consecutive years, gradu- 
ating with the class of 1900. He now holds the degree of B.D. from Vanderbilt. 
While a student in the University he joined the Tennessee Conference at Columbia, 
Tennessee, in October, 1899, and was appointed as pastor of Alex Erwin and Love 
Chapel. This charge he served one year, and during his pastorate the present brick 
church building, Alex Erwin, was erected. The previous building had been destroyed 
by fire. He had served more than a year as pastor of Epworth Mission, a church in 
the factory district of Nashville, supported by the Epworth Leagues of the city. 

September 4th, 1900, he was married to Miss Annie R. Wynne of Nashville, 
lennessee. She came from a staunch Cumberland Presbyterian family, and was 
the daughter of W. G. and Mollie Cassetty Wynne. In October, 1900, he was ap- 
pointed pastor of Hobson Chapel, a suburban church of Nashville, and was serving 
his second year when appointed as missionary to Mexico. He was appointed pastor 
of the American Congregation in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, and continued as pastor 
irom the summer of 1902 to the autumn of 1904. Owing to the ill health of Mrs. 
Dickenson he was compelled to return to the United States, and coming to his native 
fv e ' was stationed as pastor of Liberty, where he has served till the present. During 
the Conference year 1895-6, he served as senior preacher of Humansville Circuit, 
iQiT/i v : ^' -^ eer y being his assistant. At the commencement of Morrisville College, 
1904, his Alma Mater did him the honor to confer upon him the degree of A.M. 




166 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- MIDDLETON RICHARD JONES. 



The river of Christ's love broke out in the Eternity before 
Creation, runs through the world, and will empty into the 
Eternity before us.— Dr. William E. Munsey. 



Rev. Middleton Richard Jones 
was a native of White County, 
Tennessee, born December 27th, 
1821. Brother Jones came from 
Tennessee to Illinois in 1842, and 
settled in Marion County, where 
he was converted and united 
with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, the same year. 
He was licensed to preach in 
1849, at Parkville, Missouri, by 
Rev. William Patton, Presiding 
Elder. The same year he was 
received on trial into the Mis- 
souri Conference of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, South, 
and appointed to the New Mar- 
ket Circuit. He continued to 
fill important charges as pastor 
until 1861, when he was made 
Presiding Elder of the Weston 
District. In 1863, as were many 
other good and true men, he 
was driven into exile. He found 
a safe refuge in Illinois, where 
he took an active part in the 
organization of the Christian 
Union Church, of which he be- 
came a prominent leader. This 
organization after a few years 
changed its name to Episcopal 
Methodist Church and organ- 
ized the Illinois Conference, and 
before the General Conference of 
1874, the name was again 
changed to Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, and the Illinois 
was received into the sisterhood 
of Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Brother Jones was a 
fraternal delegate from that Conference to our General Conference in 1870, and a 
member of the General Conference at Louisville in 1874, as a delegate from the same 
body. He remained in the Illinois Conference, filling important appointments, mostly 
in the capacity of Presiding Elder, until 1874, when he returned to his old Conference, 
the Missouri. From this time he traveled successively the St. Charles, Plattsburg, 
Macon and St. Joseph Districts. In 1889 he was appointed to Arch Street Church, 
Hannibal, where he did valuable service for the Church and was greatly beloved by 
his people. His next appointment was on the Renick Circuit, but his work on this 
charge was of short duration, but even in this brief time he greatly endeared himself 
to the people, and his ministry was well received and gave promise of great useful- 
ness to the Church and the cause of Christ. Brother Jones was twice married. First, 
to Miss Nancy Wilson in Illinois, in 1842. Several children were the fruit of this 
marriage, three of whom survive; Mrs. Dr. Asbury, of Linneus; Rev. R. P. Jones, of 
the Missouri Conference, and the younger son, who is a successful merchant at Mays- 
ville, Missouri. He was happily married the second time in Illinois in 1886, to Miss 
Eiiza Burpo, daughter of Rev. Thomas Burpo, for many years until his death a mem- 
ber of the Alabama Conference. Brother Jones died at the residence of Thomas 
Brockman, near Renick, Missouri, November 25th, 1891, after a brief illness of eighteen 
hours. His last words to his weeping wife, just before he became unconscious, were: 
"My precious wife, I regret to leave you alone, but (pointing upward) it is all right 
up there." His work was done. His faithful ministry of over forty-two years was 
ended. God saw that it was enough and said to him: "Come up higher; enter into 
the joy of thy Lord." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



167 



REV. SAMUEL ALEXANDER. 



And with the morn those angel faces smile 
Which I have loved long since, and lost awhile !- 



-John Henry Newman. 



Rev. Samuel Alexander was 
born February 16th, 1836, near 
Elizabethtown, Carter County, 
Tennessee. He is a son of John 
Alexander and Delilah Alexan- 
der. Both parents were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He was con- 
verted in 1853, at Turkeytown 
Camp Ground, Tennessee, under 
the ministry of Rev. Joseph 
Hasken, and joined the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South, 
at the same time and place. His 
conversion was bright and clear, 
and his zeal for souls at once led 
him into work for Christ. Sam- 
uel Alexander was a true and 
faithful man — one that served 
God first. As a Christian his 
piety was thorough and con- 
sistent, always possessing a 
cheerful and happy spirit, but 
never vain or trifling. The first 
impression on the minds of 
strangers when he appeared in 
public or private was that he 
aspired to be holy above all else. 
In the earlier stages of his sick- 
ness, he was full of ecstacy 
when religious exercises were 
joined in, whether of singing or 
prayer. It almost seemed that 
his zeal literally consumed him, 
and such had been the case from 
the inceptive steps of his career. 
He felt as if employed by the 
Master. The work was great — 

the time was short — he must hasten out to improve the light as it lasted. He was 
licensed to preach in 1860, at Bloomington, Missouri; Rev. Walter Toole, Presiding 
Elder, and Rev. James Penn, preacher in charge. He was recommended to the Annual 
Conference by the Bloomington Quarterly Conference in 1860, and was received on trial 
into the Missouri Conference in 1860 ; Rev. Walter Toole, Presiding Elder, and Bishop 
Kavanaugh presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Kavanaugh in 1865, at 
Hannibal, Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop Doggett in 1866, at Richmond, Mis- 
souri. He served the following charges: Chillicothe Mission in 1860; Bucklin 
Circuit, 1861-1862; Gallatin Circuit, 1863; Supernumerary on account of health, 1864; 
Millville Circuit, 1865-1867; Linneus Circuit, 1868; Salisbury Circuit, 1869-1871; 
transferred to Holston Conference in 1872, and appointed to Saltville Circuit, Virginia. 
During these years he received into the Church about eight hundred souls. He re- 
ceived his education in the Bloomington High School. He was united in marriage 
to Miss Isabelle C. Rooker, at Brookfield, Missouri, September 29th, 1863, and the 
following children were born of this union: Olin Marvin Alexander, Delia R. Alex- 
ander and Orien Samuel Alexander. Brother Alexander was at times one of the 
most powerful men in prayer the writer has ever heard. Oh, how his soul went out 
after God. He died in Marion, Virginia, the home of his parents, February 15th, 
1874, aged thirty-eight years. Rev. Mr. Dickey says of his death: "He is gone; the 
sun went out at noon — not beneath clouds, but amid the blaze of heavenly glory." 




168 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




HARDIN CHURCH. 



Rev. E. C. Swann, Pastor. 

Hardin Church is one of the substantial church buildings of Plattsburg District. 
ine congregation is a strong one, and the membership is made up of good people. 
1 he following brethren compose the Board of Stewards: E. S. Hunt, E. M. Chase, 
A A. Young, E. M. Summers, C. G. Grove, J. W Linney, J. I. Carter, George L. 
Alcorn, J. F. Owens. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLAfTSBdRG DISTRICT. 



169 



REV EDWARD COLFAX SWANN. 



The Lord has promised good to me, 

His word my Hope secures. — John Newton. 



Rev. Edward Colfax Swann 
was born December 27th, 1865, 
in Benton County, Indiana. He 
is a son of Job Swann and 
America B. Swann. His mother 
was a member of the Presby- 
terian Church, and it was 
through her influence that he 
became a Christian. He was 
converted January 3rd, 1888, at 
Mooresviile, Missouri, under the 
ministry of Rev. J. T. McDon- 
ald, and united with the Church, 
May 5th, 1888. He had come 
home from Ludlow, Missouri, 
where he had been working on 
the railroad, just a few days 
before Christmas. He had 
grown tired of sin, went to the 
meeting with his sisters, he 
went to the altar and was tri- 
umphantly saved. He has never 
doubted his conversion, and 
there has not been a year since 
that time that he has not seen 
his advancement in divine things. 
He says continually to Him : 
"Here am I, send me/' and to 
men, "I cennre not my life dear 
unto myself that I might win 
some souls for Christ." He was 
licensed to preach in August, 
1891, by the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Breckenridge Circuit, 
Rev. J. M. Settle, preacher in 
charge, and Rev. W. E. Dock- 
ery, Presiding Elder; the same 
Quarterly Conference recom- 
mended him to the Annual Conference for admission on trial in 1892, and he was 
received into the Annual Conference that year, at Montgomery City, Missouri; Bishop 
Charles B. Galloway, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, 
in 1894, at Carrollton, Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop Candler, in August, 1898, 
at Memphis, Missouri. He has served the following charges: Green Castle Circuit, 
1892-1894; Humphreys, 1894-1895; attended school, 1895-1896; Cameron, 1896-1898; 
Kearney and Holt, 1898-1900; Platte City and Weston, 1900-1902; Edgerton Circuit, 
1902-1904. He is now serving his third year at Hardin, Missouri. He has received 
about five hundred persons into the Church under his ministry. The church at Smith- 
ville, Missouri, and the parsonage at Hardin, Missouri, were built under his pastor- 
ates. He attended the public schools, Chillicothe Normal, the District High School at 
Humphreys, Missouri, and Central College, at Fayette, Missouri. He was first married 
June, 1894, to Miss Leila Comstock, who was at one time the youngest bank president 
in the United States. She was a noble woman, possessing in an eminent degree those 
traits of character that make life beautiful and death triumphant. He was married 
to Miss Susie Edelen, March 24th, 1897, and they have three little girls, Frances A. 
Swann, Eunice Swann, and Miriam Swann, and one boy, James Edward Swann. 
Brother Swann strongly endorses the Christian College, and says that without it the 
highest and best type of manhood cannot be obtained. The Christian College turns 
out the best product physically, mentally and morally. His greatest ambition, he says, 
is to have his children educated in a Christian College. 




170 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV FRANK JOSEPH MAPEL, A.B. 



Our humanity has been enlarged, and realized, and glorified, 
Since Christ wore it, and has refused ever to lay it aside 

— Bishop Hendrix. 



By Rev. Chas. B. Duncan, A.M. 

Rev. Frank Joseph Mapel was 
born in the city of St. Louis, 
April 19th, 1870. He came of 
Methodist parentage and belongs 
to the third generation of Amer- 
ican born stock. He united with 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, at Marvin Chapel, St. 
Louis, April 1st, 1888, under the 
ministry of Rev. W. R. Mays, 
D.D. For a time his religious 
experience was not satisfying, 
but after diligent inquiry and 
an earnest seeking for a more 
perfect knowledge of the way, 
|i the mists of doubt and uncer- 
tainty were dispelled and the 
clear witness of the Holy Spirit 
was an unspeakable joy. After 
entering college he was conscious 
of the call of" God to preach the 
Gospel. In Marvin Chgpel, St. 
Louis, he received his license to 
preach, under the pastorate of 
Rev. Josephus Stephan, Rev. W 
R. Mays, D.D., Presiding Elder. 
He was recommended Cor admis- 
sion on trial by the Nashville 
District Conference, held at 
West End Church, Nashville, 
Tennessee, May, 1899, and was 
received on trial into the Mis- 
souri Conference in September, 
1899, at Fayette, Bishop Gran- 
bery presiding. He was ordained 
local Deacon by Bishop Gallo- 
way at Hannibal, Missouri. In 
September, 1896, and local Elder 
by Bishop Granbery, at Fulton, Missouri, in September, 1900. Since entering the Con- 
ference his appointments in order of time have been as follows : Rockport Circuit, 
one year; Osborn Circuit, two years; Platte City and Weston, three years; Platte City 
and Parkville, one year. He is now serving his first year at Lawson Station. During 
the fourth year of his pastorate at Platte City he projected, built and paid for the 
parsonage at that place. During his ministry he has received into the Church one 
hundred and seventy-four members, one hundred and twenty of them on profession 
of faith. 

His primary education was obtained in the public schools of St. Louis. Later he 
attended public night school for several very helpful sessions. Being convinced of the 
need of the most thorough training possible for the work of life, in September, 1891, 
he entered Central Academy at Fayette, Mo., with the determination to secure a 
finished education at any cost. After six years of study he was graduated from Cen- 
tral College with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He then spent two years studying 
Theology in the Biblical Department of Vanderbilt University, completing the Junior, 
Middle and a part of the Senior course. 

September 6th, 1900, he was married to Miss Ada Louise Latta of Nashville, 
Tennessee. She is a cultured Christian woman and has contributed much to his success 
in the ministry. They have two sons, William Latta Mapel and Frank Baldwin Mapel. 
Brother Mapel is a faithful and conscientious pastor, a hard student and a lover 
of good books. He is a strong preacher. His sermons show careful preparation and 
bear the imprint of a trained and original mind. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



171 



WILLIAM CLINTON JAMES, M.D. 



The faith that trusts and feasts is fulfilled in the faith that 
Obeys and achieves. — Dr. O. E. Brown. 



Dr. William Clinton James 
was born October 7th, 1841, in 
Union County, Illinois. He is 
a son of William James and 
Temperance Abernachy James, 
both of whom were members of 
the Baptist Church. Dr. James 
is one of seven children, one 
only surviving besides himself, 
Dr. James H. James, of Elmira, 
a practicing physician. Dr. Geo. 
James, deceased, was also a 
practicing physician at Lawson, 
Missouri. Dr. William C. 
James was converted at Jeffer- 
son School House, Ray County, 
Missouri, in the fall of 1865, 
under the ministry cf Revs. Geo. 
Huffaker and P. Wilson and 
united with the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, at the same 
time. He was converted in a 
revival meeting of great power, 
covering six weeks, at which 
there were more than eighty 
professions. This was the gene- 
sis of what afterward became 
the Lawson Class, of which he 
has been a member for the long- 
est time of any now on its rolls. 
Dr. James' conversion was of 
the sort one would look for in 
the case of a quiet, undemon- 
strative nature. He has re- 
mained steadfast. The light 
has grown brighter and the fel- 
lowship sweeter through the 
years, especially in the last 
twelve months has the presence of the Holy Spirit been a growing and deepening bless- 
ing. He attended first the public schools of Union County, Illinois, then Jonesboro 
Academy, Illinois, the Medical School, University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and 
graduated with the M.D. degree from the Keokuk, Iowa, Medical College, in 1864. 
He entered the practice of medicine in the Lawson neighborhood, continuing there 
until now, over forty-two years. Dr. James has been twice married, first to Miss 
Alice Estill, May 28th, 1874, who lived only a few months after their marriage, 
and then he married Miss Fannie Tillery, November 30th, 1881. She died February 
26th, 1902. He has two sons, William Tillery James and Donovan Erskine James. 
Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and the published sermons of Rev. Sam P. Jones are 
two of the books which have been most helpful to him. Dr. James is a man of influ- 
ence in his community, always found on the right side of moral issues, and squaring 
his own life with the square of virtue. An official member of the Church, to his 
pastors a brother and friend. A Master Mason of long standing, a physician of 
prominence, loved by all. Like the heroine of Owen Meredith's poem — 

"Born to nurse, 

And to soothe and to solace, 

To help and to heal 

The sick world. * * *■ 
In the evening of life he calmly waits the summons of the Master, looking forward 
with joy to the great family reunion in the Father's house, whither most of those held 
dear have already gone. 




172 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



PROFESSOR GRANT B. GRUMBINE, B. S., M.S. 



The Church in short, is God's University, and it lies m her 
Foundation as a school of Spiritual Life, to energize all capacity, 
And make her sons a talented and powerful race.— Bishop 

Atkins. 



Grant Bartholomew Grum- 
bine was born in Hastings, Ne- 
braska, Sunday, August 24th, 
1879. His ancestors were Ger- 
mans and of the earliest settlers 
of Pennsylvania. Members of 
the family are prominent in the 
local and state affairs of Penn- 
sylvania. 

In 1894 he graduated from 
the Carter Harrison School of 
Chicago, Illinois. In January, 
1896, he came with his parents 
to Breckenridge, Missouri, and 
filled his niche as "the man with 
the hoe," like an American to 
the manner born. In April, 
1900, he graduated from Breck- 
enridge High School, having 
completed a three years' course 
in two years. 

He entered Central College in 
the fall of 1900, where he served 
as assistant librarian during the 
session of 1900 and 1901, and 
assistant instructor of Mathe- 
matics in Central Academy dur- 
ing the session 1901 and 1902. 
He is a member of the Aristote- 
lian Literary Society of Central 
College, was captain of the foot- 
ball team of 1902 and 1903, di- 
rector of the gymnasium, mem- 
ber of the Athletic committee, 
and President of the Athletic 
Association during the session 
of 1902 and 1903. 

In June, 1903, he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. During the session of 1903 and 1904 he was in- 
structor of Mathematics in Woodson Institute, Richmond, Missouri, at the same time 
pursuing post-graduate work under the direction of the Central College Faculty. *or 
this work he received the degree of Master of Science. The thesis prepared was a 
critique of 15,000 words on Hamilton's "Moral Law." . 

December 23, 1903, he was married to Miss Mary E. Cox of Breckenridge, Mis- 
souri. She is a descendant of one of the earliest Virginia families and is a member 
of the Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

Grant B. Grumbine was elected principal of Woodson Institute in August, iyU4, 
which position he held until June, 1907, then leaving to pursue advanced study. 

"Grumbine is a man among men — he is strong in mind and body — he is a straight 
from the shoulder Christian— not a poser; he is loved most by those who have best 
chance to know him." The loyalty of his pupils shows a strength of character that 
is indicative of much personal magnetism." He is a member of the Knights Templar 
and of the Sons of the American Revolution." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



173 




REV WALTER W. WILSON. 



Men were created with the power to do wonderful works in 
The sphere of their activity. — Bishop Hay good. 

By Rev. Ward M. Baker. 
The power with which God's spirit follows a man in the inner call to the 
ministry is fully illustrated in the life of Walter W Wilson. From early boyhood he 
felt called to preach, and at the age of eighteen he was soundly converted and joined 
Hickory Grove Church, in Henry County, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. G. L. 
Taylor. Having been reared in the faith, and with a strong sense of responsibility 
to God, the call came before conversion. The sense of uneasiness and condemnation 
followed the assurance of acceptance with God. A completer consecration, the real 
joy of obedience and service came, when, after nearly sixteen years of struggle, our 
brother took up the work to which God had called him. He was licensed to preach 
by the Clinton District Conference, South West Missouri Conference, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Windsor Quarterly Conference, September 14th, 1905; Rev. S. J. 
Brown, preacher in charge, and Rev. W. M. Rader, Presiding Elder. He was recom- 
mended by the Plattsburg District Conference, Missouri Conference, which convened 
in Weston, Missouri, April 10th, 1906; Rev. M. L. Gray, Presiding Elder, and upon 
this recommendation, and after due examination, was received into the Missouri 
Annual Conference held at Carrollton, Missouri, August, 1906; Bishop Joseph S. 
Key, presiding. He was born of Methodist parentage, John W. Wilson and Nannie 
A. Wilson, in Henry County, Missouri, December 4th, 1871, and being nurtured and 
strengthened in the Lord, he was taught how to make all life honorable and success- 
ful. He had therefore a successful business career to surrender for his larger field 
of usefulness. He was trained in the district schools, Clinton High School, and the 
Missouri University. He married Miss Mary E. Miller, February 28th, 1900. John 
Miller Wilson is their only child. He supplied Missouri City Circuit the year • ot 
1905-1906, receiving thirty-one members, organizing an Epworth League, strength- 
ening and enlarging the Sunday School, securing all the conference collections and 
was returned for the second year at the desire of his membership. Common-sense, 
energy, and devotion, are his most prominent characteristics. 



174 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. GEORGE MILES GIBSON, A. M. 

God for His own sake; Goodness because it is good; truth 
Because it is lovely. — Dr. Frederick W Robertson. 



By Rev. Charles M. Bishop, D. D. 

The Rev. George M. Gibson 
was born at Pocahontas, Taze- 
well County, Virginia, Decem- 
ber 7th, 1860. He was the son 
of Wesley and Rebecca J. Gib- 
son, who were well-known in 
Tazewell and Russell counties 
as ardent Methodists and most 
respectable and useful people. 
His father was an exhorter in 
the Church for many years in 
the days when that official had 
a large influence and did a most 
important work. 

He was converted, February 
1st, 1876, at Sulphur Springs, 
Russell County, Virginia, under 
the ministry of the Rev. H. 
W- Bays of the Holston (now 
of the South Carolina) Confer- 
ence. Writing of his conversion 
he says: "Sudden as the 
lightning-flash was the vital 
change; the "purpose and de- 
sire were from infancy." He 
was licensed to preach on 
August 18th, 1883, by the Quar- 
terly Conference of Dickenson- 
ville Circuit, Abingdon District, 
Holston Conference. He at- 
tended school at Abingdon Dis- 
trict High School and Hamilton 
Institute in Virginia, where he 
was prepared for admission to 
the Sophomore class at Emory 
and Henry College, Emory, 
Virginia, from which institution 
he was graduated with the 
, . degree of B. A. in 1887. After 

his graduation he was elected a professor in St. Charles College, Missouri, where he 
taught one year. He joined the Missouri Conference on trial in the fall of 1888 
and was ordained a local Deacon at this Conference. Later in due process of time 
he was received into full connection and ordained Elder. His first charge was Troy 
and Wentzville which he served two years. Later he served the following charges 
in the Missouri Conference in the order given: Albany, Hundley Church, St. 
Joseph, Glasgow, Macon, Fayette, Richmond. In the fall of 1904 he was transferred 
by Bishop E. E. Hoss, his old College teacher and friend, to the New Mexico Confer- 
ence, and stationed at El Paso, Texas. Mr. Gibson was married to Miss Florence 
Allen at Troy, Missouri, October 14th, 1891, the Rev. C. M. Bishop performing the 
ceremony. To them have been born three children — Kate, Maude and George. 
They are a most happy family, each of them in love with all the others; and one 
would travel far before he would find a home where there is more of good cheer 
and hopefulness and Christian joy than in the Gibson home. 

Brother Gibson came early to rank among the foremost men of his Conference. 
In him are combined in a very remarkable way the qualities of the successful pastor. 
He is a studious, thoughtful, cultured man; a delightful speaker, with a clear, 
strong, sub-tenor voice; a devout Christian with a happy experience; an orthodox 
but progressive thinker, well red in modern Biblical and theological lit- 
erature. He is a man of the people, sociable, sympathetic; a good conversationalist, 
a safe adviser, courageous and skillful in dealing with souls. He knows how to 
bring things to pass. He builds up his Church both in its spiritual life and in its 
material equipment. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



175 



REV. CALVIN PLOMER CURRY. 



The highest culture and capacity are still found in the Christian 
Ranks, when the early education of such minds has been 
Favorable to Christianity. — Dr. D. R. McAnally. 



By A Friend. 



Calvin Plomer Curry 
was born in Gray Court, 
South Carolina, August, 
1869; he was a son of 
Ivory and Eliza Curry, 
Methodists ; was brought 
up in the Church; at the 
age of ten in a young- 
man's prayer-meeting held 
in his native town, he 
united with the Methodist 
Church, South, under the 
ministry of Rev. J. C. 
Counts. He was grad- 
uated from the High 
School at Gray Court. 
As a youth he took an 
active part in Sunday 
School and Church work, 
but the Master had great- 
er work for him, and a 
few years later he en- 
listed in Evangelistic 
work. From that time his 
has been a life of service; 
in his unassuming, mod- 
est way he has ceaselessly 
toiled in his Master's 
Vineyard, and not in vain 
has been his labor. He 
was licensed to preach 
April, 1905, at St. Joseph 
District Conference ; Rev. 
R. C. Taylor, preacher in 
charge, Rev. J. A. Mum- 
power, Presidihg Elder. 
May 19th, 1897, he was 
married to Miss Helen 
Pope Payne; to this union 
has been borne one child, 
Graham Payne Curry, an . . 

intelligent, interesting boy, unusually talented along musical lines. Possibly the crisis 
in the life of this man was his bright conversion in early life, but of scarcely 
less importance was his marriage to a devout Christian woman of noble char- 
acter whose inner life is singularly pure and beautiful; a fit helpmate to a con- 
secrated husband; one ever-ready to guide and aid struggling humanity toward a 
higher, better life. Of the many books which have helped him, perhaps -'The Crises 
of the Christ" and "In His Steps" have been of the greatest assistance; for years 
he has been known and designated as the singing evangelist; his songs are from 
the heart; sweet, pleading, soul-stirring. And "It is not art, but heart which wins 
the wide-world over." His power in song lies in his humility and consecration. Many 
times and oft has he made the statement that his constant prayer is to keep self 
in the background, to keep humble and lowly in this his life work. As a leader of 
Church choirs he has few superiors; he takes the crudest, rawest^ material, and by 
his enthusiasm, gentleness, power to direct and control, can, in a short time, develop 
a harmonious, well rounded chorus, delightful to hear. God grant that he may long 
live to uplift and ennoble through the potent power of song. 




176 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




THE METHODIST CHURCH IN EXCELSIOR SPRINGS, MISSOURI. 



By Rev. J. H. Hubbard. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, was organized in Excelsior Springs in 
the summer of 1883, under the ministry of Rev. Willis E. Dockery, so long of the 
Missouri Conference. The charter members of the church were John McGlothlin, 
Irene McGlothlin, Ransom Critchfield and wife, Bettie (daughter of Rev. D. Penny), 
Philip G. Holt, Elizabeth Egleston, L. J. Goff and Katherine Goff. Brother John 
McGlothlin is the only one of the number now living. He is President of the Board 
of Stewards, and also of the Board of Trustees of the Church. He has served the 
Church faithfully for about fifty years, most all of this time in the Plattsburg Dis- 
trict. The following named pastors have served this church: Rev. S. S. Hardin, 
Rev. L. B. Madison, Rev. J. S. Smith, Rev. R. W. Howerton, Rev. L. N. Wagner, 
Rev. E. L. Kendrick, Rev. H. L. Davis, Rev. Guy A. Jamison, Rev. E. S. Bottsford, 
Rev. J. P. Ball, Rev. E. J. Spencer, Rev. C. F. Wimberly and Rev. John H. Hubbard. 
The first church building was begun under the ministry of Rev. S. S. Hardin and 
completed under Rev. L. B. Madison in 1888, situated at the corner of the Concourse 
and Kansas City Avenue. The second building was begun during the pastorate of 
Rev. E. J. Spencer and completed under the ministry of Rev. C. F. Wimberly in 
January, 1904, at a cost of $6,500. During the third year's ministry of Rev. John 
H. Hubbard he completed paying the church debt of $3,100.00, including interest and 
street paving. This work has been weighing heavily on the hearts of the pastors 
and Presiding Elder, Rev. C. Grimes, Rev. M. L. Gray, Rev. C. F. Wimberly and 
Rev. John H. Hubbard, for five years. On the first Sunday in October, 1906, Bishop 
Hendrix was at Excelsior Springs and the last of the money was provided for and 
the church dedicated. Those who know the situation there can most appreciate 
the fact that the enterprise is complete, and that the church now is in a far better 
condition to do good service than it has ever been in the past. The history of this 
church is a varied one, being in a health resort, where there is so much going and 
coming. In its beginning it had a struggle for existence, as there were but few 
people who remained the year round. But as the waters cured so many people that 
were thought to be hopeless cases, the town began to take on a more permanent 
growth, and with it the church grew, so that the church with the town has about 
doubled in every way during the past five years. It is not now so hard to maintain 
the church life as formerly. While a great many people are converted and brought 
into the church that live here permanently many others are converted and come into 
the church and go elsewhere to serve God. One of the difficulties in such a place 
is that many persons who come think they will not stay long and leave their church 
membership at home, which is a hazardous way to do. It has proven the ruin spirit- 
ually of many, many souls. The two greatest revivals in the history of the church 
were conducted by Rev. J. A. Snarr, and the one conducted by Rev. Lincoln McConnell 
in January, 1907, during the pastorate of Rev. John H. Hubbard. There were three 
hundred professions during the latter meeting. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



177 



REV JOHN HENRY HUBBARD. 



No man has come to true greatness who has not felt, in some 
Degree, that his life belongs to his race, and that what God 
Gives him is given for mankind. — Phillips Brooks. 



By Rev. Ward M. Baker. 

On March 8th, 1863, our sub- 
ject was born to Rev. James 
Hubbard, a local preacher, and 
Margaret Sears Hubbard. His 
parents and his paternal ances- 
tors were Methodists. This 
farmer boy, taught to pray and 
influenced for Christ, by father, 
mother, and the best of step- 
mothers, fell into neglect. In 
the new-turned furrow, March 
18th, 1878, he pledged his life 
to God and renewed daily pray- 
er. In August, 1878, at Center 
School House, with Rev. Walter 
Toole, pastor, he united with 
the church. Two summers 
later, while seeking perfect love 
at a camp-meeting in Laplata, 
Missouri, he received a marvel- 
ous blessing; this may have 
been his conversion, he says. 
He has gone on doing the will 
of God more perfectly and seek- 
ing the power to win souls. He 
was licensed to preach in ]882; 
was received on trial at Platts- 
burg, Missouri, the same year; 
was ordained Deacon, 1884, by 
Bishop Parker, at Shelbina; or- 
dained Elder in 1886, by Bishop 
McTyeire, at St. Joseph, Mis- 
souri. His appointments have 
been: Hamburg, Oxford, 

Browning Circuits, each one 
year; Black Oak, two years; 
Renick, two years, and Cedar 
City, two years; his health hav- 

ing failed, he superannuated in 1891; 1892, Milan; two years at Bogard; Chillicothe 
Circuit, three years; Norborne, two years; Linneus, three years; Fairfax, one year; 
he is now in his third year of a successful pastorate at Excelsior Springs. With the 
basis of a common school education he has been a student of men and books. The 
books of greatest influence he names are: Ralston's "Elements of Divinity,' Wat- 
son's "Institutes," Wesley's "Sermons," Broadus' "Preparation and Delivery of Ser- 
mons," and Munsey's "Sermons." He is an interesting, engaging and earnestly spir- 
itual preacher; a soul winner, a faithful pastor, a wise and diligent executive. Nine 
hundred souls are the fruit of his ministry. The churches of Freeland and Mount 
Moriah on the Denver Circuit, Mount Pleasant on Cedar City, and the parsonages 
at Renick, Cedar City and Chillicothe are the result of his labors. He completed 
the church at Renick begun under pastorate of Rev. W. A. Davis, and the one at 
Higbee begun under Rev. W. S. Rooker. Brother Hubbard married Miss Laura Alice 
McPherson, in Gentry County, Missouri, September 1st, 1885. They have two inter- 
esting daughters, Ruth Hubbard and Iva Alice Hubbard. The call to the ministry 
came clear and distinct, while a David-like youth shepherding his fathers sheep. 
From that day he has known no other work. The record of twenty-five years is 
sketched. May another quarter of a century be his for service. 




178 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




POLO CHURCH. 



By Rev. Powell M. Cain. 

During the pastorate of Rev. J. N. Boyd at Polo, Missouri, agitation was begun, 
sentiment formed, and the building begun for a new church. During the latter part 
of his pastorate the larger part of the money was subscribed and the succeeding 
pastor found the foundation laid and the plans so well formed, and a building com- 
mittee so capable and business-like, that he was very kindly relieved of the greater 
part of the responsibility in the building. The committee consisted of J. W. Houston, 
Chairman; J. G. Withers, Secretary; C. H. Smart, Treasurer; John E. Linville, W. 
C. Stone, W. M. Estes, J. T. Hunter, J. B. Bathgate and Rev. J. N. Boyd, who was 
secretary until his place was filled by Brother Withers. The ground was broken for 
the foundation on the 2d day of June, 1903, and the cornerstone was laid the follow- 
ing October, and the building was dedicated, October 2d, 1904. Bishop Hendrix dedi- 
cated the church free from debt and more. When he finished the collection there 
was enough to pay for walks. The cost of the building, walks and everything, was 
a little more than Seventy-One Hundred Dollars. The Woman's Home Mission Society 
furnished the money for the furnishing of the church, and their taste added to 
the beauty of the beautiful church. It is a beautiful church with auditorium, Sunday 
School room, ladies' parlor, two hot air furnaces, and an up-to-date gasoline lighting 
plant. It is a credit to everyone who contributed to its success in any way. The 
Presiding Elder, Rev. Marcus L. Gray, and the pastor, Rev. Powell M. Cain, shared 
in the rejoicing of the building committee, church and community, the day Bishop 
Hendrix preached the masterful dedicatory sermon before the assembled preachers 
and congregations of the city. Mention should be made of the fact that Brother 
Charles H. Smart of the building committee had charge of the work of the build- 
ing, and he gave his personal attention to the work and the church was fortunate 
in having a builder who took personal interest in the work. It was a grand enter- 
prise, and the building of such a church means much to our cause in Polo and much 
to the community. May many souls be born into the Kingdom within its walls and 
may all who enter there be built up in spiritual things is the prayer of the writer, 
who anxiously watched the work and saw it come to a successful completion. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



179 




REV JOHN WILLIAMS BUDD, A. B. 



The ministry of the Holy Spirit is best seen in the ministry of 
Holy men whom he hath created anew in Christ Jesus unto 
Good works. — Bishop Hendrix. 



By Rev. Ward M. Baker. 
Rev. John Williams Budd was born in Sumter County, South Carolina, October 
25th, 1875. In the autumn of 1888 he joined the Sheldon Chapel, Spring Hill Cir- 
cuit, in Telfair County, Georgia, under the ministry of Rev. C. C. Hines. His 
father, Rev. James W. Budd, was a Freewill Baptist minister, but he and his wife, 
Mrs. A. A. Budd, followed their son into the Methodist Church, and the father 
became a Methodist local preacher. As to our brother's conversion, we would note 
that it was one Sabbath evening at sunset that he retired to an obscure corner of 
his father's large garden and, crying in rebellion against God for taking his brother, 
he was convicted of his own unprepared condition, and with a very heavy heart he 
fell on his face and agonized in prayer. In a few minutes God's peace flooded his 
soul. For fifteen years, in earnestness, steadfastness and faith, he has grown in 
grace and the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. His father was 
an extensive turpentine operator and was ambitious for his children to receive the 
largest advantages within their environment. This son spent three and a half years 
in South Georgia College, a preparatory school, and then completed the full four 
years' course at Emory College, Oxford, Georgia, with the A. B. degree in 1901. 
November 30th, 1901, he was married to Miss Susie Clark. They have one daughter 
and two sons, Lillian Budd, John W Budd, Jr., and William Pritchett Budd. The 
crisis of this life was in the yielding to the call to the ministry. And in the fervor 
and zeal of his ministry is manifest the force of the firm answer he gave to that call. 
His license was granted by the Quarterly Conference, Brewton Circuit, South Georgia 
Conference, Rev. M. Walker, pastor, and Rev. M. A. Morgan, acting as chairman for 
the absent Presiding Elder, Rev. George C. Thompson, November, 1893. The McRae 
District Conference, July, 1901, recommended him to the South Georgia Conference, 
which convened at Mulberry Street Church, December, 1901, Rev. M. A. Morgan, 
Presiding Elder, and Bishop Charles B. Galloway, presiding. He was received on 
trial by the above body, and at the instance of Bishop Candler immediately trans- 
ferred to the Missouri Conference and was stationed at Millville. He remained the 
pastoral limit on that circuit. He was ordained Deacon at Chillicothe, Missouri, by 
Bishop A. W Wilson in September, 1902. He is now in his second year as pastor 
at Polo, Missouri. The sixty persons received into the church by him are only a 
part_ of the fruit-bearing for the Master. Aflame with the love of God and 
missionary zeal, our brother has created a missionary conscience and secured often 
far more than the assessment from his charge. Living in the faith, knowing Jesus 
Christ crucified, he declares the mystery of the Gospel in demonstration of the spirit 
and of power. 



180 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, KINGSTON, MISSOURI. 



By Rev. C. K. Shilling. 

This church is one of the modern miracles. When I went to Kingston in Septem- 
ber, 1902, it soon became evident to me that under the existing conditions of our 
church we could not hope to make progress. The three country churches of the 
charge were put in jeopardy by our failure at Kingston. These churches were well 
located, but greatly discouraged. We owned one-third interest in a union church in 
Kingston, a dilapidated parsonage with three lots facing the court house. It was 
evident that if we held the country churches, something must be done at Kingston. 
We must have a church of our own. We had only thirty members at Kingston, and 
these were discouraged and with very little means. The most we could expect from 
any member was one hundred dollars. The pastor's wife called the few women to- 
gether and organized an Aid Society. They asked her what they were going to do, 
and she replied, "build a church, if it is only large enough for the preacher; the rest 
of us can stand outside." Like Sarah of old, they laughed. This Aid Society finally 
raised about six hundred dollars for the new church. About this time Rev. M. L. 
Gray came on the Plattsburg District. He grasped the situation at once and entered 
into the enterprise and stuck to the work to the last. The enterprise would have 
failed without his help. At the next Conference Bishop Hendrix became inter- 
ested in the new church and helped greatly by his influence. By help from every 
source that we could command, help including both Boards of Church Extension, we 
came to dedication August 12th, 1906. After an excellent sermon by Bishop Hen- 
^u^ t Vr e i. . bal . ance of the money due was raised and the house was dedicated free of 
debt. This is a modern house having an auditorium, Sunday School room, ladies' 
parlor so arranged that it can be used for class room or library, a pastor's study 
and three vestibules, choir alcove, basement with furnace which heats the entire 
n( ?use.l he building and grounds are worth about $4,000.00 or more. Among those 
™. dld valiant service in this great work may be mentioned Brothers B. F. Brown, 
William Butts, E. F. Palmer, S. B. Cline, Henry Brewer, John Harpold, J. R. Paxton, 
J. P. Meister, Rev. William Deweese, and many others. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



181 




REV- C. K. SHILLING. 



A man's living, working faith in God is measured by his Faith 
In a God who has incarnated himself in good men.— Bishop 
Hendrix. 



Rev. C. K. Shilling was born October 24th, 1859, at Felton, Delaware. He is a 
son of John Shilling and Maggie Shilling, both of whom were members ol the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He was converted in 1874, under the ministry ol 
Rev. Charles Simmons and joined the church at the same time and place. He en- 
joyed a sound conversion, one that has lasted all his life. Brother Shilling has lived 
a remarkably unselfish life. His consecration to duty is known oi all men, ana ne 
will not be without his reward. After his conversion he taught in the bunday 
School, led prayer meeting and class meeting and did anything that was laid upon 
him. He was licensed to preach by the Quarterly Conference of Walnut btreet 
Church, Kansas City, Missouri, September 15th, 1885; Dr. C C. Woods Presiding 
Elder; the same Quarterly Conference recommended him to the Annual Oonierence 
for admission on trial September 9th, 1885, but he went to school tw o y ears f™ 
was recommended the second time by the Quarterly Conference of K us sellvine, 
September 28th, 1888. He was received into the Annual Conference m 188b, Lir. o. 
C Woods, Presiding Elder, and Bishop J. C. Granbery presiding. He was ordained 
Deacon by Bishop J. C. Granbery, October 6th, 1889; ordained Elder by Bishop 
Charles B. Galloway, September 11th, 1892. He has served the following chafes. 
Cambridge, Lowry City, Lebanon, Missouri Conference, Hunnewell, Rocheport, ^eytes- 
ville, Browning, Jamesport, Spring Hill, Kingston, Platte City and Parkville He 
attended Black Swamp School in Delaware. He was married to Miss barah ^«cnen 
December 25th, 1889, a woman of refinement, faith and fidelity. Three children have 
been born to them— Charles Watson Shilling, Mattie Ruth Shilling and Mabel 
Shilling. The most intense strain upon every faculty of his being came when he 
built our new church at Kingston, Caldwell County, Missouri. The climax came with 
tears and rejoicing. 



182 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



CENTENNIAL CONDENSED MINUTES OF THE MISSOURI 

CONFERENCE. 



1. Who are admitted on trial? Harry Walter Brewer, Walter Woodfolk Wilson, 
Lee Rice Sparks, Thurston Blaine Price, Joseph Lindsey Haw, Jr. 

2. Who remain on trial? W B. Rigg, John A. Hughes, William Rutherford, 
Louis Miller Brumitt, Ortie C. Carden, Thomas Fletcher Rucker, Wilson Noblitt 
Giddens. 

3. Who are discontinued? George W Trotter. 

4. Who are admitted into full connection? Charles Jacob Chappell, Edward 
James Speer, George Thomas Ralston. 

5. Who are re-admitted? None. 

6. Who are received by transfer from other Conferences? W T. Merrill, South- 
west Missouri Conference; J. R. Abernathy, Southwest Missouri Conference; R. 0. 
Triplett, East Columbia Conference; T. F. Rucker, Texas Conference; J. W. Ham, St. 
Louis Conference; S. H. Babcock, White River Conference. 

7. Who are the Deacons of one year? Benjamin Franklin Leake, Orville Black- 
burn, Norman Francis Johnson, James Warham Slade, Samuel D. Gose. 

8. What traveling preachers are elected Deacons? None. 

Note: The members of this class were ordained as local preachers. 

9. What traveling preachers are ordained Deacons? None. 

10. What local preachers are elected Deacons? None. 

11. What local preachers are ordained Deacons? None. 

12. What traveling preachers are elected Elders? Henry Neighbors, Britton P. 
Taylor, P. M. Cain, L. W Gunby, S. E. Hoover, J. W Ham. 

13. What traveling preachers are ordained Elders? Henry Neighbors, P. M. 
Cain, L. W- Gunby, S. E. Hoover, John Wilburn Ham. 

14. What local preachers are elected Elders? None. 

15. What local preachers are ordained Elders? None. 

16. Who are located this year? A. B. Book. 

17. Who are supernumerary? J. 0. Edmonston, J. T. Kimsey, J. R. Kincaid, 
W. T. Merrill, L. F. Parker, C. A. Shearman, W. M. Wainwright, J. H. Pritchett, J. 
L. Taylor, T. H. Swearingen, H. P. Bond, R. W Howerton, R. M. Dameron. 

18 Who are superannuated? S. W. Atterberry, C. Babcock, W- F Bell, E. 
Carlyle, C. W Collett, J. S. Frazier, J. P. Godbey, A. S. Bowles, J. D. Houston, C. W- 
Herley, T. R. Kendall, W. H. Lewis, H. T. Leeper, H. M. Myers, W C. Maggart, D. 
Penny, T. G. Petree, L. P. Siceloff, D. R. Shackelford, W. G. Shackelford, C. I. Van- 
Deventer, J. L. Weatherford, A. V. Bayley. 

19 What preachers have died during the past year? W E. Dockery, H. D. 
Groves, F P. Drace, L. B. Madison. 

20. Are all the preachers blameless in their life and official administration? Their 
names were called over, one by one, and their characters examined and passed. 

21. What is the number of local preachers and members in the several Circuits, 
Stations and Missions of the Conference? Local preachers, 112; members, 47,004. 

22. How many infants have been baptized during the year? 250. 

23. How many adults have been baptized during the year? 2,043. 

24. What is the number of Epworth Leagues? 184. 

25. What is the number of Epworth League members? 6,061. 

26. What is the number of Sunday Schools? 389 y 4 . 

27. What is the number of Sunday School officers and teachers? 3,403. 

28. What is the number of Sunday School scholars enrolled during the Confer- 
ence year? 28,476. 




WESTON PARSONAGE. 
This Parsonage has recently been bought by our Weston Congregation. It is a valuable brick house and located near the Church. 
It will make a good house for the Methodist preacher and his family. All the brethren give credit for the purchase and improve- 
ment of this property to Mr. August Schneider. 




WESTON CHURCH. 
REV. OLIN J. GRAY, PASTOR. 
This is the largest church building in Plattsburg District and here a large congregation worships. 
The building was erected soon after the war. Strong men make up the official Board: August 
Schneider, W. ,A. Schwope, J. B. Huvendahl, George E. Robbins, Charles N. Lober, George Garvin, 
Prof. T. C. Monson and William Schaback. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 183 



29. What was assessed by the last Conference for the superannuated preachers, 
and the widows and orphans of preachers? $5,921.61. 

30. What has been collected on the foregoing account, and how has it been 
applied? $7,163.65. 

31. What has been contributed for Missions? Foreign, $12,688.04; Domestic, 
$7,243.51. 

32. What has been contributed for Church Extension? $3,950.26. 

33. What has been contributed for the American Bible Society? $501.24. 

34. What has been contributed for the support of presiding elders and preachers 
in charge? Presiding Elders, $12,578.23; Preachers in charge, $104,396.43. 

35. What has been contributed for the support of Bishops? $1,840.86. 

36. What is the number of societies and houses of worship owned by them? 
Number of socities, 488; number of houses of worship, 464% . 

37. What is the value of houses of worship, and what is the amount of indebted- 
ness thereon? Value, $1,291,860; indebtedness, $30,946.60. 

38. What is the number of pastoral charges, and of parsonages owned by them? 
Pastoral charges, 170; number of parsonages, 142. 

39. What is the value of parsonages, and what is the amount of indebtedness 
thereon? Value, $205,285.00; indebtedness, $11,507.00. 

40. What is the number of districts, and of district parsonages? Number of dis- 
tricts, 9; number of district parsonages, . 

41. What is the value of district parsonages, and what is the amount of in- 
debtedness thereon? Value, $ ; indebtedness, $ . 

42. What number of churches have been damaged or destroyed during the year 
by fire or storm, and what was the amount of damage? Number of churches damaged, 
3; amount of damage, $319.50. 

43. What are the insurance statistics? Insurance carried, $582,106.65; losses 
sustained, $ ; premiums paid, $2,821.61; collections on losses, $319.50. 

44. What are the educational statistics? Central College, value of property, 
$205,000; endowment. $180,000; professors, 12; pupils, 164. Central Female College, 
value of property, $125,000; endowment, $30,000; professors, 18; pupils, 158; Howard- 
Payne College, value of property, $65,000; endowment, $12,000; professors, 14; pupils, 
161. Centenary Academy, value of property, $20,000; professors, 6; pupils, 125; Wood- 
son Institute, value of property, $50,000; professors, 10; pupils, 165; Northwest Mis- 
souri College, value of property, $50,000; professors, 8; pupils, 151. St. Charles 
Military College, value of property, $52,000; endowment, $18,000; professors, 5; 
pupils, 73. Total institutions, 7; value of property, $567,000; endowment, $240,000; 
professors, 73; pupils, 997. 

45. Where shall the next session of the Conference be held? Moberly. 

46. Where are the preachers stationed this year? See the appointments. 



1& 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV DANIEL PENNY. 



He lives wisely who lives in Eternity; our citizenship is in 
Heaven. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Rev. Daniel Penny was born 
December 21st, 1811, in the City 
of Salisbury, Wiltshire Eng- 
land. He is the son of James 
Penny and Marrigin Penny, 
who were members of the Wes- 
leyan Methodist Church. He 
was converted when seventeen 
years old at Salisbury, England, 
through the pious example of 
his parents, and joined the 
Wesleyan Methodist Church at 
the same time and place. From 
early childhood he had received 
good impressions, and his con- 
version was the result of early 
training by a Christian father 
and mother and their Godly life 
and influence in the home. After 
his conversion he felt an earnest 
desire for the salvation of souls 
and began to exhort at prayer 
meetings, in his father's house, 
and in the suburbs of the city. 
He was a teacher in the Sunday 
School and assisted at prayer 
meetings before he was licensed 
to preach. He was licensed to 
preach by Rev. James Akerman, 
superintendent of the Salisbury 
Circuit, and his license was rec- 
ognized by the Quarterly Con- 
ference of St. Charles Circuit, 
St. Charles, Mo., in 1840; Rev. 
Silas Comfort being the preach- 
er in charge and Rev. William 
Patton, Presiding Elder. The 

i TV,-- . , , , . Quarterly Conference at Rich- 

P on J Missouri, recommended him to the Annual Conference for admission on trial 
m 1843, and he was received into the Annual Conference the same year; Rev. W. 
W. Redman, Presiding Elder, and Bishop James 0. Andrew presiding. He was or- 
?« al ?S^ %™\ by Bishop Andrew in 1843; ordained Elder by Bishop Joshua Soule 
L!L J ? P M? ny o- a t filled the followi *g appointments: Richmond, Missouri, 
n»«^ }£ \ Keytesville Richmond, Chillicothe, Warrenton, Danville, New London 
M*TJ ' w ?*"k ' Car J°. llt0 "' Bedford, Millville, Miles Point, Kingston, Rushville, New 
Thfr £m* ^ attsbu ^> Kingston, Spring Hill, Knoxville, Millville The parsonage at 
M^Iv n^r Un 7Vi^^Q b Q Ullt Tit r . his P ast °™te. He was married to Miss Jane 
CrlSfiplH S tI 'p 1833 ' a ^ th f ir children are James H. Penny, Elizabeth N. 
?J^nHt ■ • * I - P T2 y - Flv i of their chi ldren died in infancy. He says the only 
inS WH w 1? m i hi ; fG WaS - five n years after his marriage when they left England 
W ti»t tiw w 7 \T I™? ? J 3 *' Charles > Missouri. They had many trials dur- 
SSnH nil S& ? da ^ St - dayS of afflic tion the Lord sustained them and they 

ZtlvLS Poises verified in their experience. Some of the books which have 
n^?y"^ Wes > ey ' s "Sermons," Clarke's "Com- 

cemefe r ry, h Ray^nty? M&f^ ^ and he ^ in the beaUtiful *™ H ° P6 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



185 




REV- JAMES B. POTTER AND WIFE. 



He held high converse of the mysteries of Providence and 
Grace. — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. James B. Potter was born August 12th, 1825, and died May 25th, 1904. 
Brother Potter first saw the light of day more than three-quarters of a century 
ago on the site where Liberty, in Clay County, Missouri, is now located. He moved 
with his parents to a tract of land about half a mile east of Turney, Missouri, m 
1837. Here he grew to manhood and assisted his parents in building for themselves 
a home. At the age of twenty he was married to Miss Temperance Matthew, with 
whom he lived about eight years until she died. Of this union four children were 
born, all of whom are dead. Brother Potter's second marriage was to Miss Margaret 
Ann Doak of Sullivan Countv. Missouri, in SeDtember, 1855, with whom he lived to 
the day of his death. Of this union eleven children were born, ten of the children 
are now living, and one is dead. Brother Potter encountered all the hardshihps of 
the pioneer's life. In 1837 there were but few settlers in Clinton County; therefore 
he lived to see the country redeemed from the virgin soil to a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He witnessed the progress of Missouri until she ranks fifth place in the union. 
The limit of Brother Potter's religious career was about sixty-four years. He was 
converted and united with the Methodist Church in 1840. He was licensed to preach 
in early life; his life of devotion and labor was in the interest of humanity and the 
glory of his Saviour. He traveled and preached the gospel ten years and during his 
stay on earth he witnessed hundreds, if not thousands, of conversions. He no doubt 
enjoys the company of many who went before him to the glory land. One church 
at Turney, his home church, is a monument of his labor and devotion. He was the 
pastor's friend, his home the preacher's home, and his presence the preachers in- 
spiration. Brother Potter was respected by all and he left behind him f holy in- 
fluence that will never die. Sister Potter, his wife, abides to this day, May 15th, 190/, 
and is active in the work of her church at Turney and in many good causes. One of 
her daughters is the wife of Rev. C. B. Campbell, and all of their children are doing 
well. God bless the memory of Brother Potter, and may His blessing be with the 
widow. 



186 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




MR. PEYTON T. SMITH. 



Blessed are the Merciful, for they shall obtain Mercy. — Jesus. 



Mr. Peyton T. Smith, son of James W. Smith and Lucy H. Smith, both of whom 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, was born in St. Charles 
County, Missouri, May 3d, 1820. He was converted at Timber Ridge Camp Ground, 
six miles northeast of Richmond, Missouri, in the fall of 1843, under the ministry 
of Rev. George W. Love. He was a penitent for a few days and when he went 
forward the third time he was converted in an instant and arose laughing the praises 
of God. After conversion thus commenced his religious warfare for over sixty-three 
years. In all these years divine grace has sustained him, and he is not tired of the 
service of God. He attended country schools about three or six months in the year, 
and thus he gained practical knowledge. He was married to Miss Lucy H. Bates 
January 19th, 1843, and their children are Cleopatra Burns, one infant son died in 
1847, Dr. James W. Smith, Mary S. Smith and Nancy Frances Smith; five children, 
one haying died in infancy. Brother Smith has been an influence in Ray County 
Methodism for more than half a century, and he has been closely identified with the 
development of Methodism in Plattsburg District. Doddridge's "Rise and Progress 
of Religion in the Soul," and Baxter's "Saints' Everlasting Rest," have been books, 
aside from the Bible, that have helped him most. He was appointed steward in 1849, 
and served for fifty-four years in that relation. He led a class as a class-leader, 
beginning as early as 1851. He has a record of the pastors who have served Rich- 
mond charge since 1825. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 187 




REV HENRY IRVING COBB. 



He is a prince disguised, whose principality is broader than the 
Limits of the world. — Dr. William A. Quayle. 



By Rev. Ward M. Baker. 

Rev. Henry Irving Cobb was born in Alamance County, North Carolina, on 
Christmas Day, 1859. His parents, Dr. Gaston D. Cobb and Catherine E. Cobb, 
were Methodists. Kneeling at the altar he was soundly converted under the min- 
istry of Rev. G. W. Mitchell, a noted Christian Union minister, in November, 1883, 
and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at Holt, Clay County, Missouri, 
March, 1884, being received by Rev. John T. Winstead, preacher in charge. "Pil- 
grim's Progress" had been an inspiration of earlier years and "The Christian's Secret 
of a Happy Life" helped him to his consecration to God. The Bible has long been 
the companion of his daily devotion and has been as sunshine, moisture, and air to 
his growth in grace, ever revealing Christ. He was licensed to preach April 1, 1893, 
by the Quarterly Conference of the Cameron and Lathrop charge, Plattsburg Dis- 
trict; Rev. Rice H. Cooper, Presiding Elder, and Rev. M. L. Gray, preacher in 
charge. This Conference was held at Holt and at the same time he was recom- 
mended to the Missouri Annual Conference. That Conference received him on trial 
at its session in Monroe City, Missouri, September 13th, 1893, Bishop A. G. Hay- 
good presiding. Bishop W. W- Duncan ordained him Deacon in Macon, Missouri, 
September 15th, 1895, and the ordination to the Eldership came three years later at 
the hands of Bishop Warren A. Candler, in Memphis, Missouri, September 4th, 
1898. He has served Westville, Florida, Center, Winfield, Clarksville, Elsberry, Edger- 
ton, Osborn and Millville. Three hundred and fifty-six persons have been received 
by him into the church. This is the result of his work on his own charges, not count- 
ing his aid in other charges; an average of twenty-seven for each ministerial year. 
In our well-garnered fields and with safe and sane methods of evangelism this is a 
jey to earnest, faithful and successful work. Brother Cobb has indeed been a 
follower of Christ, doing good daily. He was educated in the common schools and 
Gibsonville Academy, Gibsonville, North Carolina. He was married June 21st, 1891, 
to Miss Mary B. Fitch. They have an interesting family — Annie Lee Cobb, Lucille 
Cobb, and De Roy J. Cobb. Wallace Irving Cobb is with the Heavenly Father. To 
rear his family for God, to shepherd the flock of the Lord committed to his care, to 
finish his course with joy, and to accomplish the ministry which he has received of 
the Lord Jesus, and to testify of the abundant grace of God, is the ambition of this 
iaithful minister. 



188 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 





COWGILL CHURCH AND PARSONAGE. 



REV W N. GIDDENS, PASTOR. 

Cowgill Church has been a success from its inception. The Parsonage makes a 
pleasant preacher's home. Both properties command the respect of the community. 
The following brethren are on the official Board: 0. W Coffman, John B. Rogers, 
James A. Linville, C. L. V- Cogman, C. 0. Petty, B. F. Kincaid, Olin 0. Walters and 
Charles L. Wells. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



189 




REV WILSON N. GIDDENS, A. M. 



Where on the sand Thy step appears Thy Crown in sight is 

Hung. — Keble. " 

By Rev. A. B. Culbertson, A. M. 

Rev. Wilson N. Giddens was born of Methodist parents, James and Mary Gid- 
dens, in Cedar County, Missouri, May 11th, 1869. In July, 1889, he joined the 
Methodist Church at old Mount Moriah in the Plattsburg District. Four years after 
this he was brought under powerful conviction for sin by the preaching of Rev. T. 
H. Swearingen, and while struggling with this conviction, on a mowing machine out in 
the meadow, God graciously converted his soul. Even after this, for two years, doubts 
at times harassed him, but by prayer and faith he gained the victory over these. 
His faith is now strong, his experience bright, and his desire to do the work to which 
God has called him is increasing from day to day. 

He received his license to preach from the Plattsburg District Conference in 
March, 1896; Rev. R. H. Cooper, Presiding Elder. His recommendation for admis- 
sion on trial in the Missouri Annual Conference was given by the St. Joseph District 
Conference in 1904 and in 1905, when the Conference met at Columbia, Missouri, he 
was admitted and Bishop Hendrix ordained him Deacon. 

His first charge was the Marceline Circuit, 1904-1905, then appointed to the 
*ayette Circuit. He is now at Cowgill, 1907. He has received as many as one hun- 
dred members into the Church. 

He is a graduate of Central College and received his A. M. degree from that 
Institution in June, 1906. He married Miss Gussie Leah Larkin, June 15th, 1904. 
He looks upon his conversion and decision to enter the ministry as important crises in 
ms life. The "Pilgrim's Progress" and "Christian's Secret of a Happy Life," have 
impressed him deeply. 

He thinks the Christian College the place for boys and girls to go to school, 
and that the imperative duty of Christians is to sufficiently endow these Christian col- 
leges so that they can compete with state institutions. 

With his clear conversion, thorough consecration, and broad foundation laid in 
school work, his life promises to be one of great usefulness. 



190 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




KEARNEY PARSONAGE. 



Rev. J. M. Bone deserves great credit for the improvement of our parsonage 
property at Kearney, Missouri. Through his efforts we have a good two-story house, 
nicely finished and ample rooms upstairs and down. Our Kearney congregation wants 
the best and succeeds. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



191 



REV JOSEPH MARVIN BONE. 



So glorious let Thy pastors shine 

That by their speaking lives the world may learn, 
First, filial duty, then divine; 

That sons to parents, all to Thee may turn. — Keble. 



By Rev. Ward M. Baker. 

Rev. Joseph Marvin Bone was 
born September 19th, 1870, and 
at the age of twelve, deep con- 
viction of sin fell on the boy's 
heart as the father preached the 
gospel in Hundley Chapel, St. 
Jospeh, Missouri ; the mother led 
her child to the altar, and there 
at the mercy seat he gave his 
heart to God. An early call to 
the ministry of righteousness 
came clear and strong to this 
youth. And with a desire to be 
certain of his call, and with the 
inducements of a promising busi- 
ness career before him, he en- 
deavored to meet the demands of 
God's Spirit in the active work 
of our church at Carrollton. 
Finally in the year 1896, a real 
crisis came to his life when he 
consented to go and preach the 
Gospel in the name of our Lord 
and Saviour, Jesus Christ. The 
Carrollton Quarterly Conference 
recommending, the Chillicothe 
District Conferenme in session 
at Triplett, Missouri, April 15th, 
1897, licensed him to preach and 
recommended him to the Mis- 
souri Annual Conference. The 
latter body at its session in Al- 
bany, Missouri, September, 1897, 
received him on trial. Brother 
Bone's first appointment was 
Braymer Circuit, where he built 
a parsonage at Stet, Missouri, 
and a new house of worship , , „ „„fi,m in 

called Wesley Chapel. He traveled DeWitt Circuit, three years and w ^ a™ve in 
League Work, being also League Chairman of Chillicothe District; he remodeled the 
parsonage, increased largely the contributions to benevolences and rec f^ea a iai$e 
number into the church He spent one year at Milan, strengthening the charge in 
every way and helping to clear the new church of debt. He is now completing hi 
fourth year at Kearney, Lathrop and Holt, where his activity in all good worra 
has been very marked. A handsome new brick church has been built at iioit J J 
new parsonage at Kearney. Over three hundred persons have been received into tne 
church by his labors on his appointments. He is frequently called ^ °ther ctoar&B 
for revival work. He is a painstaking and thoughtful pastor, a studious P^acner. 
He finished his conference course regularly, being ordained Deacon at .layette m 
souri, in 1899, by Bishop Granbery, and Elder at St. Joseph, Missouri, in ^ U1 ' ."£ 
Bishop Candler. He has had the benefit of some of our best primary and High 
Schools and three years at Central College. Along with an evident mc ^® J. 1 ndine 
lectual discipline and strength, has been a growth in grace in a deeper u J der ^ a , na " § 
of spiritual things, a consecration to God's will, and a perfecting ; love fo bod ana 
man. He was married to Miss Ida May Darcy, September 12th, 1894, in c ^ [[ ^' 

Missouri. His sons are, Francis Darcy Bone and Joseph Marvin Bone, Jr., two veiy 
promising boys. May the mantle of prophetic office fall on one or both oi tneni. 




192 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV GRAFTON EVERETT TANQUARY 



When life is done, and climbed its rugged steeps, 

All hot suns set; 
When in vast joy that neither sighs nor weeps 

We then are met. — Dr. William A. Quayle. 



By Rev. Chaney Grimes. 

Rev. Grafton Everett Tanquary was the youngest son of the late Rev. Grafton 
Tanquary of this Conference, and was born in Clark County, Missouri, July, 1859. 
While in health he was always bouyant, hopeful, and full of enthusiasm. He spoke 
with becoming modesty of his conversion, and subsequent religious life; his soul was 
in sympathy with the highest and best in the Kingdom of Grace. He knew God; and 
with all the strength of his nature he believed in God's word. His faith was clear, 
strong, constant, and without the slightest taint of scepticism. He loved his Church 
as he loved his own life, and was never happier than when trying to promote her 
interests. 

He graduated from Central College in 1886, and the following year he was 
received on trial in the Missouri Annual Conference. In the matter of order and 
dates his ministry was very much like that of his brethren; but he, nevertheless, 
was possessed of a somewhat striking individuality. He sought to lay the truth on 
the heart and conscience in such a way as to move to immediate action; and he was 
in no small degree successful. Through his brief ministry hundreds were converted 
and added to the Church. He served acceptably, and in some instances with marked 
success, the following charges, viz: Parkville, Marceline, Memphis, Shelbina Circuit, 
Jameson, Arch Street Hannibal, Canton and Plattsburg. His last appointment was 
to Lawson Station in the Plattsburg District. For six months his health had been 
failing, but it was hoped that his removal to a lighter work would enable him to 
regain his health, and prolong his ministry. He entered upon his last work with 
something of his old-time enthusiasm. He planned and assisted in one of the best 
meetings of his entire ministry. Nearly one hundred souls were converted. At its 
close, and about his last official act, he had the great joy of receiving about sixty- 
five souls into the Church. In this meeting he became so joyous and hopeful that his 
friends thought him well on the way to complete recovery. But this hope was doomed 
to disappointment. The reaction came and he grew rapidly worse. Deep and dark 
were the shadows through which he was called to pass, and through which his friends, 
in agony of suspense, followed him. But no sunset clouds can destroy the beauty of 
such a life, or rob us of our hope in his death. He died in St. Joseph, Missouri, May 
21, 1902, and his body was laid to rest in the cemetery at Kahoka. The bereaved 
wife, Mrs. Sue McMurry Tanquary, and the two children, Grafton Pettus Tanquary 
and Frances Tanquary, now reside in Kahoka, Missouri. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



193 



REV EDWIN JAMES STANLEY 



It is these sublime tasks to which he subjects our faith and 
Obedience here to fit us to be rulers over many cities there. 

— Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. Edwin James 
Stanley was born Feb- 
ruary 19th, 1848, at 
Buffalo, Missouri. His 
father was Henry Stan- 
ley, and mother, Sally 
Ann Stanley. He was 
converted in 1859, at a 
camp-meeting near Cir- 
cleville, Kansas, and he 
joined the Methodist 
Episcopal Church under 
the ministry of Rev. 
Wm. Knipe. He joined 
the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, about 
1861, under the minis- 
try of Rev. H. H. 
Hedgepeth at Circle 
ville, Kansas. After he 
had made a profession 
of faith, he was troub- 
led some with doubts, 
but persevered in secret 
prayer', until one night, 
in a little grove near 
his home, while plead- 
ing with God, his Sav- 
iour stood before him. 
He had a very clear evi- 
dence of his acceptance, 
and his heart was 
strangely warmed. Ever 
since then he has been 
gaining a deeper insight 
into the things of God. 
Forgetting the things 
that are behind, he is 
pressing toward the 
mark for the prize of 
the high calling of God k 
in Christ Jesus. He 
was licensed to preach mv - E - J " STANLEY - 

m September, 1867; by the Quarterly Conference of Leavenworth Circuit, Savannah 
District; Rev. J. 0. Foresman, preacher in charge, and Rev. H. H. Hedgepeth, Pre- 
siding Elder; was recommended to the Annual Conference by the Quarterly Con- 
ference of the Holton Circuit, in 1869, and was received into the Annual Conference 
that year at Chillicothe, Missouri, Rev. D. C. O'Howell, Presiding Elder. He was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop E. M. Marvin in September, 1871, at Council Grove, 
Kansas; ordained Elder by Bishop George F. Pierce, in 1874, at Denver, Colorado. 
He has served the following appointments: Irving Mission, as supply, Holton Cir- 
cuit, Irving Mission, Troy Circuit, Radersburg Circuit; Montana, Hamilton Circuit; 
Diamond City Circuit; Virginia City District and Station, since which time he has 
served as Presiding Elder and preacher in charge of various charges throughout the 
Conference. Rev. Dr. David Morton gives Brother Stanley the credit, in one of the An- 
nual Reports, of starting the movement that resulted in the organization of the Chu jTCh 
Extension Board. He was married to Miss Lulu Lee Brooke, December 23rd, 1886, 
and their children are as follows: Rachel Stanley, Marvin Stateler Stanley, Edwin 
James Stanley, Ernest Brooke Stanley, Mary Edith Stanley and William Stanley. 




194 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




THE PLATTE CITY PARSONAGE. 



By Rev. Frank J. Mapel. 

Platte City had had for many years a parsonage — and for many years Methodist 
preachers had occupied it. There was a common feeling among the people as to 
what ought to be done; the ways and means did not seem so clear. The first consid- 
eration was an eligible building site. The active women of the church, working to- 
gether under the name of the "Parsonage Aid Society," made possible the acquisition 
oi the same And in less than eleven months they raised, by various ways, the sum 
Moi°K r hun <Jred and eighty-six dollars. In August, 1905, a fine piece of ground, 
(iyi by nearly 400 feet), occupying a commanding situation on a fine residence street, 
was purchased for five hundred dollars— a monument to the genius and consecration 
of a small company of Methodist women. The Building Committee was composed 
as follows: Hon. Norton B. Anderson, Chairman; Calvin Ham, Treasurer; T. B. 
1 lannery, and Rev Frank J. Mapel. The plans and specifications were a gift of that 
godly layman C. W. Broadhurst, of Parkville, Missouri, since gone to his reward, 
alter whose elegant residence the parsonage was modeled. Ground was broken in 
October, 1905. In March following the structure was finished, and occupied soon after, 
ihe money was raised as follows: The Parsonage Aid Society earned $500.00 for 
the purchase of the lot, plus about $50.00 for screening windows, doors, etc. The 
old property sold for $650.00. The remainder, about $1100.00 was raised by the 
pastor, Kev. Irank J Mapel, in amounts ranging from $100.00 to fifty cents. The 
subscriptions of Mr. W S. Wells of $100.00, Hons. E. H. Norton and R. P. C. Wil- 
son, $50.00 each, Hon. N. B. Anderson, $60.00, and Mrsi. M. P. Collins, $50.00, and 
others, were tokens of liberality. For a year the pastor went about "loaded" with a 
subscription list, photographs, and facts and figures. The house presents a sightly 
appearance, is modern in plan and conveniently arranged. The materials are first- 
class throughout, and the workmanship faultless. It contains eight rooms, besides 
outier s Pantry and a number of closets, and the stair case is solid oak. The struct- 
ure was built and paid for m one year, and well insured against fire. No man is -so 
wen qualified to free a building of debt as the one who enterprised it. But left en- 
cumbered, the successor is likely to have a half-done cake to warm over, always an 
unsatisfactory dish, and often an unpalatable mouthful to have to swallow. To the 
women of the church belongs the credit of the initiative; it was through the co- 
operation of the membership, and the kindly and timely assistance of a sympathetic 
community, that the project was brought to a consumation, free of all debt. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



195 



MR. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BOYDSTON. 



We shall do well to consider what is God's plan in our times, 
And fulfill our part of it with all fortitude and fidelity. 

— Bishop Candler. 



By Rev. Ward M. Baker 
Henry and Mary Boydston 
came from East Tennessee and 
entered land in Platte County, 
Missouri, in 1836. They were 
strong and sturdy pioneers and 
devout Methodists. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was their 
fifth child. James N. Boydston, 
the oldest brother, was long a 
pillar of the Edgerton Church; 
Thomas S. Boydston was, until 
only a few years ago, one of 
the leaders at Davis Chapel; he 
has now moved to Oklahoma. 
Every one who knows the Boyd- 
ston family will testify to the 
strong faith and unceasing zeal 
of "Uncle Tom." In prosperity 
and adversity, he has ever been 
faithful to God. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Holland, a sister, abides 
with her daughter near Davis 
Chapel, and is a lover of Zion. 
Two sisters, Catherine Louisa, 
and Mary J., were successively 
the wives of Mr. R. T. Davis 
of St. Joseph, Missouri. Rachel 
Crow, another sister, the wife 
of Mr. W. H. Smith, went home 
to God in March, 1907. Mis- 
souri, the youngest sister, is the 
wife of Mr. Geo. Arnold of 
Dearborn. All this family were 
at one time connected with 
Davis Chapel Church, and all 
remained faithful to the Meth- 
odist Church. Since this fam- 
ily has occupied so large a place 

in the history of our Church, it seems befitting to include them in this sketch. Brother 
Benjamin F. Boydston was converted at the Slash Valley School House in 1859, under 
the ministry of Rev. Thomas Hurst. He, his parents, two sisters, Eliza- 
beth and Mary J., R. T. Davis and wife, Thomas Butts, and I. Davis and wife, 
nine in all, were organized into a class at that time and they were the beginning of 
Davis Chapel Church. He was married in Independence, Missouri, by Rev. M. M. 
Pugh, July 31st, 1867, to Miss Martha Ann Borden, and they have had a family of 
twelve children, ten of whom are living. Rev. Martin Caples Boydston, M. D., a 
local preacher, a physician, graduate of Louisville and post graduate of Bellvue, 
New York; Wightman McTyeire Boydston, a Ph. B. graduate of Central College; 
Vincil Vandeventer Boydston; Cora Ella Boydston, now the wife of Mr. T. J. Means, 
of Dearborn; Rev. James Edward Boydston, a local preacher; Martha Edna Boyd- 
ston, wife of Mr. McTyeire Harris, of Dearborn; Benjamin F. Boydston, Jr.; Henry 
Pierce Boydston; Norton Payne Boydston, and Garland Galloway Boydston. All are 
members of the Methodist Church, and all but two members of the old home church. 
Brother Boydston has always been a leader in the church. He has been steward, 
trustee and was Sunday School Superintendent for twenty years. He has educated 
his children, giving nearly all of them several years at Central College. He believes 
m Christian education. He has been a successful man in business and has accumu- 
lated a good competency. He has long been a ready and strong helper in all that 
pertains to the Church. He holds an honored place among his friends and in his 
own household.. 




196 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV W S. CALDWELL. 



Ages and generations to come will be yet more productive in 
Spiritual husbandry. — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. W- S. Caldwell was born oh a farm near Hickman's Mill, Jackson County, 
Missouri, August 26th, 1866. His father died when he was only six weeks old. 
He received his education in the public schools and under private teachers until 
1885, when with his widowed mother he removed to Stanley, Johnson County, Kan- 
sas. There he engaged in farming and stock raising until 1889, when the death 
of his Christian mother made a deep impression upon him, and created a desire for 
a nobler life. He had been a member of the Christian church at Hickman's Mill, 
since he was seventeen years old, but knew nothing of experimental religion until 
August, 1889, at the age of twenty-three, when the Lord opened his eyes to see His 
saving grace and pardoning love. He became an active worker in the Methodist 
Protestant denomination at Stanley, Kansas. He attended the Annual Conference 
as a delegate from the local congregation and in the interest of the Young People's 
Society of Christian Endeavor. He felt the call to the ministry and entered Central 
College, Fayette, Missouri, in 1893, uniting at that time with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He remained in Central College almost continuously until graduation 
in 1901. He traveled abroad, returning in the fall of the same year, and entered 
the Theological department of Boston University where, at the close of the first 
year, his health became so impaired as to wholly disqualify him for the responsibili- 
ties of his chosen work, 

He was married April 20th, 1904, to Miss Katherine Maxwell, of Martin City, 
Missouri. Mrs. Caldwell has been a loyal Methodist, an active worker in the Church, 
and a consecrated Christian since girlhood. Two sons, James Marvin Caldwell and 
Herbert Stanford Caldwell, have been born to this family. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



197 




MR. ROBERT JAMES CLARK. 



How far the influence of manliness and dignity extends !- 
Goethe. 



Robert James Clark, son of John B. Clark and Rachel Clark, was born August 
17th, 1841, in Giles County, Tennessee. His father was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, and his mother was a Cumberland Presbyterian. He was 
converted in January, 1870, at Greenville, Clay County, Missouri, and joined the 
church at Lawson, Missouri, in 1876, during the pastorate of Rev. Joseph Devlin. 
He was converted at a union service at the Methodist church commenced at Quar- 
terly Meeting in December, 1869, by Rev. S. W. Cope, and Rev. W. P. Wilson and 
assisted by Revs. Felts and Roan of the Baptist church, and Yantes of the Pres- 
byterian church, and Rev. Wiley Clark of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, re- 
sulting in about one hundred and fifty conversions, and continued for six weeks. He 
is "still pressing forward to the mark of the prize." He was married to Miss Sallie 
A. Moore, October 1st, 1870, and they have five children living, to-wit: Orson, Frank, 
Robert J., Albert M. and James K. Clark. One daughter, Mattie, died in infancy. 
Brother Clark has been one of the faithful members of Lawson Church for many 
years. Engaged in the banking business, he has many true friends. He 1S sa ± e 
in counsel, and true to his convictions. He has enjoyed Books of Sermons O. r. 
Fitzgerald's Books, and others of that character. He came to Ray County, Missouri, 
in 1854; crossed the plains to California with an ox team in 1859; journeyed to 
Oregon in 1860; took a small part in the Indian wars of the Sixties, and returned 
to Missouri in 1867, and has lived at Lawson, Missouri, nearly all the time since 
1870. 



ios 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MR. JAMES BOLTON BATHGATE. 



What is the highest happiness of mortals, if not to execute what 
We consider right and good? — Goethe. 

Mr. James Bolton Bathgate 
was born September 17th, 1871, 
near Knoxville, Ray County, 
Missouri. His father, Thomas 
Bathgate, was a member of the 
Presbyterian Church, and his 
mother, Rachel Bathgate, was 
a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He 
was converted in March, 1894, 
at Knoxville, Missouri, during 
a revival meeting conducted by 
Rev. I. T. Nash. He joined 
the church and was baptized 
at Knoxville, Missouri, under 
the ministry of Rev. J. T. Win- 
stead, but moved his member- 
ship to Polo, Missouri. He was 
converted at the night service 
at the altar. His lack of faith 
had been his greatest hindrance; 
it was hard for him to believe 
that God could do it all alone. 
Even before his conversion, and 
most certainly since, it has been 
his desire to develop himself in 
Christian character and bring 
out the best that is in him for 
God. God has been good to him 
and reveals His truth, enlight- 
ens his understanding, as He 
sees best for his spiritual devel- 
opment, and as he more fully 
understands His will and pur- 
pose and the great need He has 
for His followers, his determina- 
tion becomes stronger to do 
His will more perfectly, and 
in His service he is drawn nearer to God and his fellow man. His education was 
received at the public schools and at Central Business College, Sedalia, Missouri, 
where he graduated in May, 1892. Brother Bathgate has made use of his business 
training in the service of his church; he, with many others, helping in the erection 
of the beautiful new Methodist Church at Polo, Missouri. He was married to Miss 
Eva Dorcas Slack, October 4th, 1892, and they have had three children, all of whom 
are dead. His life has been of an even temperament; from boyhood he has had a 
strong desire to make his mark in the world as a business man, but since his con- 
version, he finds that to be a thorough business man, it is necessary to trust in a 
higher power for guidance in battling with the rough edges of life. Some of the 
books, aside from the Bible, which have been most helpful to him, are Emerson's 
Essays and Lectures, Life and Works of Wesley, Spurgeon, Moody and Talmage, 
John G. Paton, and works of Dr. Livingston, Samuel Smiles, J. R. Miller, D. D., 
Bishop Galloway, and Bishop Hendrix. He has been a teacher in the Sunday School 
since March, 1894, and steward since May, 1894, and president of the League for 
several years. He went into the hardware business, September 4th, 1892, and con- 
tinued in that business for eleven years; organized the First National Bank, at 
Polo, Missouri, September 4th, 1905, and has been cashier of the above named bank 
since its organization. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



199 




REV JAMES ROBERT HEDGES. 



The world respects a genuine Man. — Bishop Haygood. 



Rev. James Robert Hedges was born September 29th, 1862, near Otterville, Cooper 
County, Missouri, where he grew to manhood. He was married to Miss Minnie L. 
Todd April 20th, 1887. He was converted under the ministry of Rev. C. A. Lewis, 
at the age of twenty-seven years. He was licensed to preach in the spring ot 
1892, at Pleasant Hill church, on the Otterville Circuit, Rev. R. S. Hunter, Presiding 
Elder, and recommended to the Annual Conference the same year. He was received 
on trial at the Annual Conference held in Independence, 1890, Bishop Galloway pre- 
siding. He was appointed to Cross Timber Station and served this work one year; 
Mountserrat Circuit, three years; Columbus Circuit, one year; Buckner Circuit, tour 
years; Houstonia and Herndon, one year; Sweet Springs and Blackwater, three years; 
Malta Bend and Grand Pass, one year; fall of 1906, transferred to Missouri Con- 
ference by Bishop J. S. Key, and stationed at Kingston. He was ordained Deacon 
by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, at Jefferson City, 1904; Elder by Bishop Galloway, at 
Nevada, 1906. His pastorates have generally been pleasant, and his mixing qualities 
are good. He is a temperance advocate, and his style of sermonizing is practical. 
Brother Hedges has wrought well in all the charges where he has served, and he has 
made many friends. Sister Hedges is one of the noble women of our Methodism. One 
of the daughters, Miss Clara Hedges, excells in music. Miss Ruth Hedges, another 
daughter, is a good student, and has a practical turn for affairs. Miss Bessie is hne 
in elocution and gives promise of good success in her chosen line. 



200 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV JOHN WESLEY MATTHEWS, M. D. 



The highest work of each generation is to saturate the life 
Of its children and youth with the truth and spirit of the Son 
Of God. — Bishop Atkins. 



Rev. John Wesley Matthews, was born near Baltimore, Maryland, May 29th, 
1825. He is a son of John Matthews and Henrietta Matthews, both members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted August 12th, 1840, at a 
campmeeting and joined the church the next day, under the ministry of Rev. E. 
Reed. His conversion was very clear and bright. He was licensed to preach March 
17th, 1852, by the Quarterly Conference at Wellington, Lafayette County, Missouri; 
Rev. Andrew Monroe, Presiding Elder. He never applied for admission to join the 
Conference; he wanted to be free and go where he could do the most good. He was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop Wightman at the Jonesburg District Conference; ordained 
Elder by Bishop Wightman at Louisiana, Missouri. He traveled under Rev. T. T. 
Ashby who had charge of the Indians in Kansas when it was a Territory; he also 
had his regular appointments in the Circuit where he lived and filled the pulpit 
at Warrenton, Missouri, for eight years. He was married to Miss Eliza Ann Straughn 
October 20th, 1848, and four children were born unto them: Henry Earl, Francis 
Holmes, Jessie L. and Mattie Matthews. Brother Matthews is now living in Lib- 
erty, Missouri, with his youngest son. Having passed the eighty-first mile post in 
life, he is just waiting for the messenger to come and take him across the river to 
rest under the shade of the trees. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



201 



REV DUDLEY C. O'HOWELL. 



Love to God and man, the root of all benevolence, is religion 
Itself. — Dr. Wm. E. Munsey. 



By Rev Bowman D. Sipple. 

Dudley C. O'Howell was born 
in Jackson County, Missouri, 
January 31, 1834; was convert- 
ed in early manhood through 
the influence of his Methodist 
mother; licensed to exhort in 
1856; licensed to preach Sep- 
tember 20, by the Poplar Bluff 
Quarterly Conference, and re- 
ceived on trial in the St. Louis 
Conference October, 1856. His 
first appointment was Harts- 
ville Circuit as junior preacher. 
In 1857 he transferred to Kan- 
sas Conference; Nimeha, 1858, 
and ordained Deacon by Bishop 
Andrew; Mount Pleasant, 1859; 
ordained Elder in 1860, by 
Bishop Kavanaugh, and ap- 
pointed to Nimeha Circuit. 
The foregoing dates are secured 
from the General Minutes, 
though they do not agree with 
the sketch in the Minutes. No p 
Minutes are given in 1861-67 V 
In 1868, his appointment was \ 
Holton; Richmond, 1869; super- 
annuated, 1870; Holton, 1871; 
Council Grove, 1872; Leaven- 
worth District, 1873-75; Atchi- 
son District, 1876; transferred 
to the Missouri Conference and 
stationed at Maryviile, 1877-78; 
Osborn, 1879-80; Lawson, 1881; 
10th St. St. Joseph, 1882; 
Plattsburg, 1882-83; Plattsburg 
District, 1884-87; Brunswick, 
1888-89; Mexico District, 1890- 
93; St. Charles District, 1894. With the exception of traveling the Norborne Cir- 
cuit, 1896, he was supernumerary until his death, January 24, 1899. "From the 
prairie circuit to the city station he faithfully preached the gospel to all classes 
of hearers, and 'much people were added to the Church. He was thoroughly versed 
both by investigation and experience, in Arminian theology. He dealt sturdy blows 
on every dogma that impeached the impartial love of God. He showed God to be 
no respecter of persons. There was no arbitrary will in the atonement; all of the 
benefits hinged on the free will of man. Salvation, as he preached it, rested on 
ordinance of man. The righteousness of Christ availed to save only so far as it 
made man righteous, liberating him from the guilt, the love and the power of sin. 
The hope of final success in the Christian life depended upon the fidelity of the sin- 
ner, aided by divine grace, and not upon any arbitrary election or favoritism. Brother 
O'Howell never received large salaries, but by his economy and good judgment in 
a few investments brought him such large returns that he was enabled two years 
before his death to give more than ten thousand dollars to the Conference Trust 
Fund for superannuated preachers, their widows and orphans. He loved his church, 
her doctrines, her polity and her ministry. Never did a Christian fall asleep more 
gently than did he." 

Brother O'Howell represented his Conference in the General Conference in 1874. 
He was a safe man, carefully looking into every detail of the work, and most helpful 
to young preachers. His quaint and pleasant questions to a board of stewards kept 
them always in a good humor, though they might wince under the points made. 
Children loved him because he loved children, and would go far to attend a children's 
service. _ One preacher remembers the friendship of this same man as few other 
friendships experienced. He stood alone in his individuality. 




202 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



HON. MARTIN E. LAWSON. 



Christianity is fiitted to mankind as a palm-branch is fitted to 
A king's hand. — Dr. Wm. A. Quayle. 



By Rev. Chas. B. Duncan, A. M. 

The success of a local church 
is in no small degree dependent 
upon the character of its lay- 
men. Intelligent conceptions of 
the work and mission of the 
church, fervent piety, and an 
abiding interest in her welfare 
on their part, qualify for leader- 
ship and insure success; but the 
absence of these will seriously 
handicap the most resourceful 
preacher. 

The congregation at Liberty 
is fortunate in possessing a 
number of such men. Promi- 
nent among them is Martin E. 
Lawson, a native of Pennsylva- 
nia, who was born in Franklin 
County, May 15th, 1867. Four 
years later his parents moved 
to the West. After spending 
three years in Fulton County 
Illinois, they removed to a farm 
in DeKalb County, Missouri, 
where he grew to manhood. 
Like many of our successful 
men, upon reaching his majority 
he found himself without money 
or influential friends. But he 
had assets far more valuable 
than these for he possessed all 
the latent elements of manhood 
necessary to a successful career. 
With characteristic energy and 
determination he began the study 
of law, making his way as he 
went. He was admitted to the 
bar at Liberty, Missouri, October 
20th, 1890, where he has continued to practice until the present time. His industry, 
integrity, and ability have enabled him to build up a lucrative business and have won 
for him a place of high rank in the legal fraternity. 

He was converted and united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at 
Liberty, in February, 1890. Recognizing the worth of the young man, in the following 
May his pastor had him appointed superintendent of the Sunday School, a position 
he has held continuously until the present time. Subsequent results have fully justi- 
fied the_ wisdom of the choice. He has served both as steward and trustee during the 
whole time of his connection with the church and has represented his district as lay- 
delegate to the Annual Conference. When Woodson Institute, the secondary school for 
the Plattsburg District, was established at Richmond, Missouri, he was appointed on 
its board of curators and continued to serve in that capacity until it was correlated 
with Central College. In all these various fields of activity, his sound judgment, lib- 
erality, faithfulness and devotion have made him a very useful man to the church 
and have given him a potent influence for good in his communitv. 

October 10th, 1894, he was married to Miss Kate Riley, of Liberty, Missouri, who 
has proven a very worthy helpmeet. Two children, James Enoch Lawson and Nancy 
Lawson, have come to bless their home. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



203 



REV WILLIAM RICHARD WEAKLEY, Ph.B. 



Would God this man owned the whole world! for then the poor 
Would be made to rejoice, and the sad of heart would know 
What a friend they had. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Rev. William Richard Weak- 
ley was born February 26th, 
1868, at Knoxville, Missouri, and 
was converted at the age of fif- 
teen in a meeting held at Law- 
son, by Rev. T. H. Swearingen, 
assisted by Rev. John T. Win- 
stead, who preached the day he 
was converted. He was gradu- 
ated with the degree of Ph. B. 
from Central College in 1893, 
and entered the Missouri Con- 
ference the same year, and or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop Hay- 
good, September 17th, 1893. His 
first appointment was Grayson 
Circuit. During this Conference 
year he was accepted by the 
Board of Foreign Missions as a 
Missionary candidate. The Fay- 
ette, Missouri, Methodist Sunday 
School having provided a sum 
sufficient to pay his traveling 
expenses and support him for 
a year, he left his home town of 
Lawson, Missouri, January 29th, 
1895, and arrived at Kobe, Ja- 
pan, February 20th. He was 
appointed for work and lan- 
guage study to the city of Hime- 
ji, one of the old castle towns 
of feudal Japan. After staying 
here something over a year, he 
was appointed to the historic 
city of Oita where it is said 
Francis Xavier, the great Jesuit 
Missionary, did his last work in 
Japan. The Oita Circuit had 

five appointments, widely separated and hard to work, but God's hand was wonderfully 
revealed in the results of the six and a half year's work there. In 1901, the workers 
hearts were gladdened by a revival of great power when many young men gave full 
evidence of sound conversion. It was while serving the Oita work that he married, 
at Kobe, Japan, July 11th, 1899, Miss Gertrude M. Wilcox, daughter of Rev. G. B. 
Wilcox, D.D., Professor Emeritus of Pastoral Theology in the Chicago Theological 
Seminary, a Congregational school. Miss Wilcox was at the time of their marriage 
teaching in Kobe College, a mission school for girls in Kobe, Japan. After a fur- 
lough to the homeland, his first appointment on returning to Japan was to the 
Hiroshima Circuit. Arriving there in the midst of the Russo-Japan war, he and his 
wife, with other missionaries in the city, had free access to the military hospitals, and 
during the year gave out, to the sick and wounded, Bibles, tracts and hymn books 
by the thousands, besides visiting and speaking to hundreds and thousands of the 
soldiers in the hospitals. The sights and sounds of those days made of Brother 
Weakley an uncompromising Peace Advocate. In 1905 he was appointed to West Osaka 
•and Sakai Churches, and at the present writing he has this work. 




Ml 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



DR. FRANCIS HOLMES MATTHEWS. 



Who can limit God's use of a consecrated man, or count the 
Rewards to those who obey Him? — Bishop Hendrix. 



Parents, J. W. Matthews, 
M. D., and Mrs. Ella Flanders 
Matthews. They were enthusi- 
astic members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. The 
father still lives, making his 
home with his son in Liberty, 
Missouri. Born in Troy, Illi- 
nois, June 29th, 1866. Convert- 
ed in 1881, at New Harmony, 
Missouri, Rev. T. R. Kendall, 
pastor. He joined the Church 
immediately after conversion. 
He was trained in a most de- 
vout Christian home, and was 
saved many experiences which 
come to the majority of boys. 
While seeking religion he went 
to the "mourners' bench" re- 
peatedly, expecting some great 
change, or experience. Having 
been reared in such a consecrat- 
ed home, naturally this sudden 
change never came. But he 
yielded his heart to the Lord, 
and joined the Church and be- 
gan to live as he thought a 
church member should. Such be- 
ginners ordinarily mark the best 
Christian lives. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, and 
after some years in business, at- 
tended the University Medical 
College, Kansas City, Missouri, 
graduating in March, 1900. He 
located in Liberty, Missouri, for 
the practice of his profession, 
and soon became one of the lead- 
ing physicians of the county. He married Miss Mary S. Allen, daughter of Trigg T. 
Allen, Esq., of Liberty, Missouri, December 14th, 1892. Children, Elizabeth and 
Francis Holmes, Jr. Dr. Matthews received his first impulse for an education in his 
childhood home. His mother was a woman of superior education, and being a trained 
teacher, her children were given regular courses of instruction under her direction. 
A home with a good library and choice literature, a mother directing his studies 
during vacations, when he had regular recitations, these were the influences that helped 
him more than all else. His father was a busy physician, but took time to give 
him instruction relative to the many temptations of boyhood, and thus saved him from 
many pitfalls. His father is also a local Elder in our Church at Liberty, and during 
the year 1852 was associated with Dr. Nathan Scarritt in evangelistic work. He was 
missionary to the Indians, and has ever been a faithful and earnest preacher. 

The mother was a strict observer of early Methodist usages. In connection with 
the Quarterly Conference, the regular fast was observed, and no meat was eaten from 
Friday to Monday. She was gifted in prayer, and took part in the class meetings. 
Excepting times of sickness she taught a class of young women in the Sunday School 
all during her life. Their home was always a home for the preachers, and the mother's 
chief deligrht was to minister to some faithful servant of God. 

Dr. F H. Matthews joined the Liberty Church in the spring of 1893. For years 
he has been serving on the Board of Stewards, has acted in the capacity of District 
Steward, and for a number of times has been delegate to the Annual Conference. He 
was president of the District Epworth League when the Conference was held in Rich- 
mond in 1898. Dr. S. A. Steel was present at this convention, and by many this is 
remembered as one of the very best of conventions. Dr. Matthews is loyal to his Church, 
interested in her welfare, and faithful to her ministers. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT, 



REV. ALFRED SNOWDEN. 



205 



Friend! my comforter and guide! 

Strong in thyself, and powerful to give strength. — Coleridge. 



Rev. Alfred Snowden was 
born of Methodist parents in the 
year 1873 in the state of Wis- 
consin. In September, 1893, 
while working at the printers' 
trade in the city of Minneapolis, 
a revival was in progress in the 
Hennepin Avenue Methodist 
Episcopal Church; the pastor, 
Rev. W. Hollman, D.D., was as- 
sisted by Bishop Isaac W. Joyce. 
The influence of this revival was 
far reaching; the revival wave 
reached him on Sunday evening; 
he was drawn to the Church by 
some unseen power, this being 
the first time he had attended 
church for five years. The 
Bishop preached like a man who 
was travailing in agony over 
lost souls. During that master- 
ful sermon, conviction seized his 
soul, carried him to the chancel, 
and while the preacher complet- 
ed his discourse, "I thought on 
my ways," Heaven spoke peace 
to his soul. This night was the 
prayer of faith answered that 
had ascended to the throne of 
God twenty years before on the 
day of his baptism. More light 
was the one desire of his life. 
He made it a rule of life to 
speak to at least one person a 
day about his eternal destiny. 
God honored these efforts, and 
gave him a clear conception of 
a "spirit filled" life. Perhaps 
the red letter day of his life was the day he decided "I must preach;" this decision was 
fought for eighteen months. He was at the time of conversion established in business 
as a printer, but the call to preach was strong and clear. The years following his 
decision to preach the Gospel were spent in training for his life work in the following 
institutions: Fayette Academy, two years; Woodson Academy, one year; Park College, 
two years; Chicago Institute (Missionary Training School), two years. He was 
licensed to preach in 1899 by the Plattsburg District Conference. He was received into 
the Missouri Annual Conference on trial in 1900, Rev. C. Grimes then being his Pre- 
siding Elder; ordained Deacon in 1902, by Bishop A. W. Wilson, at Chilhcothe, Mis- 
souri; ordained Elder in 1904, at Columbia, Missouri, by Bishop E. R. Hendrix. He has 
served the following charges: Rushville, one year; Kingston, two years; Missouri 
City, three years; Osborn, two years. During his ministry about 150 persons have 
been added to the Church. During his pastorate at Missouri City he secured a parson- 
age for the charge. "College culture can be secured without spiritual environment, 
he writes, "but we believe that conduct and character are the main ends in education, 
and that doing our utmost for the Church and general society, we do well to secure 
the education of as many young men and women as possible under the tutelage of 
Christian teachers and in the spiritual atmosphere of a Church College." 




o 



20H 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



•™i'"'~ - 




MR. J. H. SNOW 



And He shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children. 

—Malachi. 



He was born in Campbell County, Virginia, June 6th, 1836. While yet in infancy 
he was taken to Greenup (now Boyd) County, Kentucky, and reared by Baptist parents, 
in the vicinity of Catletsburg and Ashland. When twenty-one years of age he came to 
Daviess County, Missouri, settling near Pattonsburg in the spring of 1857. There the 
following year he was, through the ministry and good counsel of Rev. E. K. Miller, 
Presiding Elder of Savannah District, taken on trial into the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. Shortly before his probation expired, he was by order of Rev. A. E. 
Sears, Presiding Elder, admitted to full membership and baptized by Rev. William 
Ketron, preacher in charge, and made steward at this Quarterly meeting. The action 
seemed hasty and premature, but the results have been lasting, for he has been class 
steward or recording steward, and most of the time filled both offices at once, from that 
day to the present time, a period of nearly fifty years. The classes to which he has 
belonged have never been delinquent at the end of any of these many years. He loves 
the Church of God; he loves the Sabbath School. They have both been great blessings 
to him. He has organized schools in every community that he has lived in. He was 
Superintendent of one school for twenty-one years. He has been in some way con- 
nected with the Sunday School interest for sixty years. Though growing old in years 
(nearly 71) he is still young in heart and life; still striving to become better himself, 
and to do all he can to make others better. His church relations and environments 
have not been such as he desired. Unfortunately for himself, he has spent most of his 
life on the border of our two Methodisms, where there have always been conflicting 
interests. He has labored earnestly and contributed liberally to the upbuilding of our 
Church. For nearly twenty years, previous to 1900, he was honored by the brethren 
of Plattsburg District by electing him a lay delegate to the Annual Conference, and 
until his hearing became impaired, it was a great privilege to meet and mingle wltn 
that body of good and noble men. Their wise deliberations and sweet associations were 
a real benediction to him. He still holds them in high esteem, always glad to meet 
them and always rejoices to hear of their successes and triumphs in their great calling. 
With them he has had many pleasant seasons on earth, and, by the Grace of God, he 
expects to spend eternity with them in our Father's House above. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



207 




MR. SAMUEL BRUCE HITT. 



His geniality, his wit, and his talents drew around him an 
Admiring circle. — Dr. D. R. Mc Anally. 



Mr. Samuel Bruce Hitt first looked upon this beautiful world, December 2nd, 
1832. He was the son of Daniel Hitt and Johanna Hitt of Virginia, and was of a 
long line of Methodist ancestry. He was converted under the ministry of Rev. George 
W. Crumbaugh at Hopewell Church, Carroll County, Kentucky. His religion was a 
principle that grew with his years and by trying to do the will of God. His was a 
constant growth in grace. He was married to Miss Hannah Dowees, of Carroll 
County, Kentucky, October 29th, 1862, and the following children were born of the 
marriage: Bruce D. Hitt, Arthur J. Hitt, James Cope Hitt and Mrs. Florence A, 
McCarty. In 1859 he was called to Osborn to the position of telegrapher, the first 
to hold that place for the new Hannibal & St. Joe railroad. The first preacher came 
from Plattsburg, Rev. Perkins, and the young agent made appointment for service in 
the depot. From that time on his humble home was always open to the circuit rider. 
And during the perilous war times he not only gave them shelter, but was a refuge when 
their lives were in danger, as Rev. Middleton R. Jones, Rev. W. A. Tarwater and Rev. 
Jesse Bird and others could testify. Then he and his brother, Benjamin M. Hittt, and 
brother-in-law, W S. Moore, laid the plans and carried a large proportion of the 
burden of building of a church and parsonage at Osborn. His house was the home of 
the saintly Cope and family while he was Presiding Elder of Plattsburg District. It 
was there Rev. W E. Dockery, to use his own words, "made a preacher of Johnnie 
Winstead." There the Quarterly Conference was held until the Church was completed. 
The following is an extract from the last letter written by Brother S. W. Cope, only a 
short time before his death: "I am glad to have known Brother Hitt so long and so 
favorably. I think of the two years I spent in your home with my family with greatest 
pleasure. I count them among the happiest of my life. And think, too, of the oft- 
times we used to meet in the sanctuary of God. Such days can never be forgotten. 
I rejoice with you in the long, useful life of your husband and in his happy death. 



208 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




MRS. NANCY M. HALE. 



The trying of your faith worketh patience. — St. James. 



By J. E. Roberts, Sr. 

Nancy M. Hale was born in Grayson County, Virginia, July 28th, 1828. She 
removed with her husband, James D. Hale, in 1850, settling in DeKalb County, Mis- 
souri. She joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in the Maysville Circuit, 
Rev. M. Naylor, preacher in charge. Her husband was killed near Stewartsville in 
Clinton County, on July 22nd, 1864. They subscribed for the St. Louis Christian 
Advocate in 1852 or 1853. Mrs. Hale has remained a widow and has been a continuous 
subscriber to the paper ever since. She is now a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church in Meade, Kansas, no Methodist Episcopal Church, South, being anywhere near 
her. She is still active for one of her age and reads every number of the good old 
Advocate. For a number of years she was a member of the Francis Street Church, 
St. Joseph, Mo., under the pastorate of Bishop Hendrix and Brother Vandeventer. 
Mrs. Nancy M. Hale went through the days that were dark when Dr. D. R. McAnally 
stood at the helm of the St. Louis Christian Advocate, and helped by his untiring 
labors and devotion to save the Church that was dear to his heart. It is well that 
those days are gone and at least somewhat forgotten. No wonder the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, is dear to the hearts of her devoted members who have come 
up through the years gone by, years of suffering and trial. Dr. W B. Palmore, the 
present editor of the Advocate, lives now in another and a better day. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



209 




REV WILLIAM PAYTON OWEN. 



He that winneth souls is wise. — Solomon. 



Rev. William Payton Owen, son of Sanford Owen and Elizabeth Owen, was born 
at Black Oak, Caldwell County, Missouri, August 16th, 1854. Both parents have 
always been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted 
at Black Oak, Missouri, in the winter of 1871, during a protracted prayer meeting, but 
did not join the Church until two years later under the ministry of Rev. Gralton 
Tanquary; he was converted in the old-fashioned way at the old-fashioned mourner s 
bench. His growth in grace was gradual until the 27th day of April, 1894 when 
he experienced the blessing of perfect love. He was licensed to preach the 17th day ot 
March, 1889, by the Quarterly Conference of Millville Circuit; Rev. T. H. bwearengen, 
preacher in charge, and Rev. J. M. O'Bryen, Presiding Elder. He was recommended 
for admission on trial by the Quarterly Conference of Shelbma Circuit, either the latter 
part of August or the first part of September, 1889, and was received into the 
Annual Conference on trial, in 1889, Rev. J. H. Pritchett, D.D, Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop Granbery presiding at this conference; was ordained Deacon by Bishop war- 
grove at Hillsdale, Kansas, in September, 1891, and ordained Elder by Bishop Haygood 
at Kansas City, Kansas, September 3rd, 1893. The order of his appointments is : At 
Excello, Missouri, September, 1889 to 1890; Shawnee Town, Kansas, 189U toi»yi, 
Wellington, Kansas, 1891 to 1892; Winfield, Kansas, 1892 to 1893; Fairmount , Kansas, 
1893 to 1895; Perry, Kansas, 1895 to 1896; Bronson, Kansas, 1896 to 1897 ; *eiso, 
Kansas, 1897 to 1899; Wellington, Kansas, 1899 to 1900; Bogard, Missouri, 1900 to 
1902; Chillicothe, Missouri, 1902 to 1904; Oakesdale, Washington 1904 to 19UO, 
Genesee, Idaho, from September, 1905, to January, 1906; Arbuckle, Calitornia, irom 
January, 1906, to October, 1906, and is now at Smithville, Missouri. One thousand 
persons, or more, have been received into the Church during his ministry, ne wab 
married August 23rd, 1893, to Miss Ottie A. Miller; the names of his children are. 
Edgar Lee Owen, Eugene Palmore Owen, Roy Francis Owen, Ada Maud Uwen. n 
considers the experience of perfect love the most important crisis in his lite, ^ unya ^ 
Pilgrims' Progress and The Life of James B. Finley are books that have been very 
beneficial in his Christian life. He considers the Christian College a very important 
part of every Church. 



210 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV WILLIAM LESLIE MYERS. 



Innocence is the attribute of the created, but holiness of the 
Obedient. — Dr. Fairbairn. 




Rev. William Leslie Myers, son of Bernard 
Leslie Myers and Mary Elizabeth Myers, both 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, was born October 7th, 1878, near Tur- 
ney, Clinton County, Missouri. He was con- 
verted at Parrot's Grove about two miles east 
of Perrin, Missouri, in a camp meeting held by 
Rev. R. W. Howerton, in August, 1890, and 
joined the Church at Turney at the close of 
that meeting. He had been reared in a Chris- 
tian home, where prayers were offered night 
and morning. Having had religious instruc- 
tion early in life he became deeply interested 
in his salvation. He had been under conviction 
for several days during Brother Howerton's 
camp meeting and was converted at the last 
night service of the meeting after the congre- 
gation had left. His young heart was filled 
with a sweet peace, and he quietly went to his 
parents and his pastor and told them he had 
been converted. For the first four or five years 
of his Christian life he made little progress 
and soon fell into a backslidden condition, from 
which he was reclaimed during the preaching 
of Rev. E. C. Swann, and feeling a call to 
preach, he soon began preparation for the ministry. During his first year's ministry 
he became convicted for perfect love, and after reading much on the subject became 
thoroughly convinced that it was for him and began to seek it. He was finally blessed 
while on the Parkville Circuit, and has found it a very valuable addition to his 
former religious experience. He was licensed to preach by the Plattsburg District 
Conference at Kearney, Missouri, April 5th, 1900; Rev. E. C. Swann, pastor, and 
Rev. C. Grimes, Presiding Elder. The same District Conference recommended him to 
the Annual Conference for admission on trial, April 5th, 1900; and he was received 
into the Annual Conference on trial in September, 1900; Rev. C. Grimes, Presiding 
Elder, and Bishop Granbery, presiding; ordained Deacon by Bishop Wilson in Sep- 
tember, 1902, at Chillicothe, Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop Hendrix in Septem- 
ber, 1904, at Columbia, Missouri. He served his first year on two charges, filling out 
the unexpired year, four months, on Linden Mission and eight months on Missouri 
City Circuit; was then appointed by Bishop Candler to Hallard, now Rayville Circuit; 
then by Bishops Wilson and Galloway to Parkville Circuit, two years; then again 
twice by Bishop Hendrix and once by Bishop Key to Rayville Circuit, where he is now 
stationed. He has received about one hundred and seventy persons into the Church 
under his ministry. He received his education at the Turney Public School and Wood- 
son Institute, Richmond, Missouri. He was married to Miss Lillie May Shreve, July 
31st, 1901, and they have one son, Charles Leslie Myers. He considers his call to the 
ministry, which he resisted for some time, and his conviction for perfect love as the 
most important crisis in his life. Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, which he read in early 
life, has been a source of help, both in his religious life and for illustrations in preach- 
ing, also a paper, The Christian Witness, has proven most helpful. He thinks colleges 
that are thoroughly Christian the great need of to-day and very necessary for a well 
rounded education. 



MISSPURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 



211 




HARDIN PARSONAGE. 

Hardin Parsonage was built under the direction of Rev. Edward C. Swann. He 
collected the money and the people at Hardin subscribed willingly and liberally. 
Brother W. B. Hughes was greatly interested in this enterprise. This house is a 
success. 



212 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




GOSNEYVILLE CHURCH. 

Rev. W. P Owen, Pastor. 

This is one of the finest country churches in Plattsburg District. It was finished 
under the pastorate of Rev. G. B. Smith, and the church was dedicated by Rev. J. M. 
O'Bryen. The official Board for the entire charge is as follows: J. H. Coleman, 
Andrew Collins, P. C. Meek, Clarence Taul, John Fisher, J. W. McGee, George Allen 
and G. E. Broadhurst. Local preachers, Rev. J. N. Hulse and Rev. B. F. Clark. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— PLATTSBURG DISTRICT. 213 



BOARDS OF EDUCATION 



Which have rendered valuable assistance in promoting the Semi-Centennial of Cen- 
tral College: 



Missouri Conference Board of Education — Rev. John Anderson, President; H. D. 
Thompson, Vice-President; A. B. Culbertson, Secretary; J. A. Leavell, Treasurer; Rev. 
Willis Carlisle, Rev. B. P Taylor, Rev. G. A. Lehnhoff, J. Wiseman, Dr. A. B. Miller, 
Rev. F. J. Mapel, J. 0. Terrell, F. H. Schooler, C. W Barrett, Rev. W T. Whiteside, 
Hon. Martin E. Lawson, Dr. T. S. Bishop, Rev. J. W. Kimbrell, Dr. H. K. Givens, 
G. W. Ballew. 



St. Louis Conference Board of Education — Rev. T. E. Sharp, Chairman; Dr. J. 
W. Vaughan, Treasurer; Rev. L. E. Todd, P, P. Lewis, Rev. C. N. Clark, Robert 
Lamar, Rev. T. 0. Shanks, D. L. Mumpower, Rev. J. M. Bradley, R. G. Applegate, 
Rev. W- B. Hays, F. E. Williams. 



Southwest Missouri Conference Board of Education — Rev. J. J. Pritchett, Presi- 
dent; Rev. C. E. Patillo, Vice-President; Rev. S. G. Keys, Secretary; Rev. T. C. 
Puckett, W- C. Scarritt, T. W- Cunningham, Rev. E. K. Wolfe, J. D. Lindsay, A. G. 
Campbell, Rev. F E. Gordon, J. T. Rector, E. W- Schultz, Rev. J. B. Ellis, M. E. 
Benton. 



214 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE. 




IAN MACLAREN. 



1 806— CENTENNIAL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 



ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



M. H. Moore. 
Francis Street. 
Hundley 
Olive Street. 
Centenary 
Gooding. 
Spruce Street.. 
Hyde Park. 
Rushville Ct, ... 
Savannah Ct.. 
Savannah Sta.. 
Ravenwood Ct. . 
Mound City Ct.. 



.Presiding Elder 

. S. P. Cresap 

.B. P Taylor 

... .C. W Tadlock 

S. H. Babcock 

W. L. Scarborough 

.J. L. Haw 

W. G. Borchers 

Sup. by John Chapman 

.J. P. Ball 

. S. W Hayne 

... .L. W Gunby 

.0. C. Carden 



Barnard Ct. . 
Skidmore Ct. . 
Elmo Ct.. 
Fairfax Ct.. 
Craig Ct. . 
Rockport Sta.. 
Maryville . 
Dearborn Ct. . 
Agency Ct. . 
Hamburg Ct. . 
Rulo Mission. 
Superintendent 
ciety 



.M. Moore 

.J. C. Kindred 

... . S. E. Hoover 

. C. V Lanius 

. L. M. Brummitt 

. C. C. Grimes 

.A. C. Johnson 

.H. C. Bolen 

.J. Holland 

.J. S. Rooker 

To be supplied 

Children's Home So- 

.J. T. McDonald 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



215 



REV MATTHEW HENRY MOORE, D.D. 



To saturate life with God, and the world with Heaven, that is the 
Genius of Christianity. — Dr. Frederick W Robertson. 



Rev. Matthew Henry Moore, 
the son of Dr. John R. Moore 
and Lucy Burges Moore, was 
born in North Carolina, October 
31st, 1857. His great grand- 
father Moore was prominent in 
Virginia affairs in the Revolu- 
tionary period. His grand- 
father, Rev. Thomas Moore, was 
a member of the Virginia Con- 
ference. Brother Moore received 
his early education in a private 
school; he afterwards attended 
the Davis Academy at Louis- 
burg and later, Rocky Mount 
College. His home life has been 
a happy one. Married to Miss 
Eugenia Thomas of Leasburg, 
North Carolina, in 1884, seven 
children have been born to their 
union. The oldest, Mr. Olin 
Moore, A.M., is Professor of 
Modern Languages in Millsap's 
College; the second, Mr. Henry 
Moore, A.M., is now studying in 
Yale University for his Ph.D. 
degree; the third, Miss Eugenia 
Moore, is teaching in Bartletts- 
ville, Indian Territory; the 
fourth, John Moore, is a student 
in Missouri University; the 
other three remain under the 
parental roof. In 1878 he en- 
tered the ministry of the North 
Carolina Conference and was 
appointed to the Onslow Circuit, 
and his ministry was crowned 
with one hundred conversions 
the first year. Later he was ap- 
pointed to Chapel Hill, where 
the University of North Caro- 
lina is located. He was for 
seven years editor of the North 
Carolina "Christian Advocate." 
A series of biographical sketches 
entitled, "Pioneers of Methodism," by him, attracted the attention of Bishops Keener 
and McTyeire, Dr. Charles F. Deems and other leading men of the Church, and the 
publication in book form was called for. Bishop McTyeire cites this book as one of 
his authorities and quotes from it in his History of Methodism. After eleven years 
of service in the North Carolina Conference, Brother Moore was transferred to the 
Denver Conference, and stationed at Pueblo. Later he served Trinidad Station. In 
1892 he was transferred to the St. Louis Conference, where he served West Plains 
Station, then three years as presiding elder of the Charleston District, and two years 
as pastor of Wagoner Place Church in the city of St. Louis. He was then transferred 
to the Missouri Conference and stationed at Columbia. He served Moberly Station 
one year, and was then appointed to Carrollton; at the beginning of his third year at 
Carrollton he was appointed, by Bishop Hendrix, Presiding Elder of St. Joseph District. 
In each of the four conferences with which he has been identified he has served on 
important committees and given himself fully to furthering the interests of the Church. 
A faithful and tireless worker, ambitious to see the Kingdom of God advanced, he loves 
the Church, and all her interests are on his heart. Under his leadership, the St. 
Joseph District has taken on new life and the Church is steadily moving on to 
victory. 




216 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV CORNELIUS ISAAC VANDEVENTER. 



Blessed are they who have a noble past, a yesterday crowded with 
Figures and memories of things beautiful and lovable. — Dr. 
Joseph Parker. 

Rev. Cornelius Isaac 
VanDeventer, son of 
Cornelius and Mary 
Clark (Galleher) Van- 
Deventer, was born 
July 25th, 1825, in Lou- 
doun County, Virginia. 
On his father's side he 
came of Presbyterian 
stock, his mother's peo- 
ple being Methodists. 

Brother VanDeventer 
received his early edu- 
cation in the common 
schools and later at- 
tended Mr. C. A. Lord's 
Seminary at Shelby- 
ville, Mo., and a school 
at Philadelphia, Mis- 
souri. 

His conversion, which 
he marks as the most 
important crisis in his 
life, occurred during a 
meeting held in the 
summer of 1839, at the 
Otter Creek Camp 
Ground, in Monroe 
County, Missouri. He 
united at once with the 
Methodist Church, Rev. 
Robert Jordan being 
the preacher in charge, 
and Rev. Andrew Mon- 
roe the presiding elder. 
Of his experience in 
conversion Brother 
VanDeventer gives the 
following account : 
"After great discour- 
agement, on the last 
night of the meeting I 
felt a sweet sense of 
rest, peace, and of sins 
forgiven, with a con- 
scious change of in- 
clination and purpose 
to forsake the wrong 
and follow the right." 
, As to growth in grace 

he makes the following statement: "My belief and experience in the matter of growth 
in grace is substantially that where 'the Lord has planted grace' in conversion, the 
conditions required being complied with, and in proportion as they are complied with, 
growth will follow in the spiritual as in the natural realm, as illustrated in the 
parable of the leaven." 

Brother VanDeventer was licensed to preach February 22nd, 1844, by the Quar- 
terly Conference of the Shelbyville Circuit; Rev. James M. Green, P.C., and Rev. 
Jesse Green P. E. In the following September the same body recommended him to the 
Annual Conference for admission on trial, and he was admitted at the session which 
convened m St. Louis that same fall, Bishop T. A. Morris presiding. 

tvi ^ ug " ust 27th > 1846, Brother VanDeventer was married to Elizabeth Ann Grimes, 

ol Pike County, Missouri. For nearly sixty years Sister VanDeventer lived to bless 

1%} and t0 Serve the interests of the Church. To the union were born three 

children, Mary Elizabeth, Olin E. and John W., of whom only the second survived the 

mothers death in November, 1905. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



217 



MRS. ELIZABETH GRIMES VANDEVENTER. 



Firm, unwavering Trust, that knows no passing cloud, is a work 
Of Time with all who have an inner personal nearness to the 
Savior. — Dr. Cunningham Geikie. 

By Rev. Sanford Preston Cresap. 

Elizabeth Grimes VanDe- 
venter, daughter of Captain 
and Mrs. John J. Grimes, 
was born in Paynesville, Pike 
County, Missouri, January 
5th, 1830; died in the family 
home, in St. Joseph, Mis- 
souri, November 7th, 1905. 

Sister VanDeventer was 
led to Christ and into the 
Methodist Church, under the 
ministry of Rev. Jacob Sig- 
ler, at the early age of eleven 
years. She was married to 
our brother, the Rev. C. I. 
VanDeventer, August 27th, 
1846, the Rev. Jacob Lanius 
officiating. Through the long 
period of nearly sixty years 
these people lived happily to- 
gether. Of the union were 
born three children, Mary 
Elizabeth, Olin and John 
William. Of these, Olin with 
the husband survive the wife 
and mother. As the wife of 
an itinerant Methodist 
preacher. Sister VanDeven- 
ter was faithful in every re- 
spect. Cheerful in hardship, 
patient in trial, courageous 
and trustful in sorrow, wise 
and efficient in active minis- 
tries, she was to her hus- 
band a helpmeet indeed. 
"And the heart of her hus- 
band did safely trust in her." 
Her's was a positive Chris- 
tian character. To do the 
Lord's work was her highest 
ambition and greatest joy. 
Back of her husband's large 
success as a Christian minister, was her stimulating hope and cheer and constant 
prayer, and her own supplementing ministry. . 

She was greatly interested in the Missouri Conference, following the details of its 
work and watching with anxious eye every step of its progress. Her visits to the An- 
nual Conference sessions were bright oases in her itinerant experience. Here she 
became acquainted with most of the preachers and knew them to love them. She 
always showed interest in their families, and often expressed anxiety for their comfort. 

It has been an inspiration to St. Joseph Methodism, through many years, to have 
had living in their midst and closely identified with their Christian life, Brother and 
Sister VanDeventer. Thirty-two years they have spent in this city. Six years Brother 
VanDeventer was pastor of the Francis Street Church, nine years Presiding Elder 
of the district, three years pastor of Hundley, one of Centenary, and one of Spruce 
and Gooding. During the last twelve years in a superannuated relationship to the Con- 
ference, they have lived here, a sweet and inspiring benediction to all. The Francis 
Street Church has been the special beneficiary of Sister VanDeventer's life during 
these years. She has been a sister to the aged, a mother to the young and maturing, 
and like a grandmother to the Church's children. May the influence of her life, potent 
and helpful, always linger with us, though she be gone. 




2 IS 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV GEORGE T. HOAGLAND. 



Blessed are they that do His Commandments, that they may have 
Right to the Tree of Life, and may enter in through the gates 
Into the city. — St. John. 



By Rev. C. M. Bishop, D.D. 

Rev. Geo. T, Hoagland was 
born in Elizabeth, N. J., Febru- 
ary 7th, 1814, and died at St, 
Joseph, Missouri, October 30th, 
1903. He lived nearly sixty-five 
years in Missouri, having come 
to Boonville about the year 1838. 
From there he moved to St. 
Joseph in 1852. He was married 
to Miss Nannie Gale, of Eliza- 
beth, N. J., February 2nd, 1842. 
In their early life Mr. and Mrs. 
Hoagland were members of the 
Presbyterian Church, but while 
at Boonville they united with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, in which communion he 
was a devoted and faithful and 
very useful member to the end 
of his long life. Brother Hoag- 
land was from the time of his 
first coming to St. Joseph con- 
nected with the Church, which is 
now known as the Francis Street 
Church. He was an officer in it 
for many years, being a local 
preacher, a steward, Sunday 
School Superintendent, and a 
trustee. When his health failed 
he relinquished all official posi- 
tion, except that of trustee, re- 
questing the Quarterly Confer- 
ence not to renew his license to 
preach. But his love for the 
Church in general, and his de- 
votion to the local Church con- 
tinued to the very end of his 
+ u- a 4.T. 1. t l^ e - For many years previous 

to his death he was unable to attend upon the public services of the Church, but he 
never tailed, during visits of his pastor, to inquire anxiously after all the interests of 
the work, and with the increasing costs of the maintenance of the Church he invariably 
increased his own contribution accordingly. He was a man of much prayer, and a 
great lover of the Word of God. His pastor rarely ever visited him, when he was able 
to enter into conversation at all, that he did not find him dwelling upon some inspiring 
and comforting passage of scripture, which he would quote as they talked together. 
Mis patience was remarkable. He longed to depart and be with Christ, but did not 
complain His invariable response to the greeting of his friends was, "I am waiting." 
±5rother Hoagland was unusually successful in business, and out of the rewards of it 
he did much in the way of benevolence, and in support of the various institutions of 
the Church It was characteristic of him that he did not want his benefactions made 
Known to the public, and much that he did was known only to himself and those whom 
he helped and perhaps a few confidential friends of the recipients of his kindness. In 
this way the writer has come upon the knowledge of some noble deeds of which the 
world was entirely ignorant. His works live after him in gifts which he made to 
Central College, to the cause of Missions, to the Memorial Home for the Aged in this 
city, and the Church of which he was a member for more than fifty years. The 
funeral was conducted by his pastor, assisted by Rev. C. I. VanDeventer, who had 
known him intimately for more than a half a century, and who read a beautiful and 
affecting tribute to his memory, during the service. His aged widow and one daughter 
and two sons survive him, holding his life and character in holy and reverent memory, 
and hoping to meet him again after the earthly end. He invested $20,000 at one time 
in Central College, Fayette, Missouri. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



219 



MR. THEODORE BROWN HOAGLAND. 



There is inspiration in a noble example of generosity, no less than 
In a great thinker or leader among men. — Bishop Hendrix. 

By Rev C. I. VanDeventer. 
Mr. Theodore B. Hoagland, 
son of George T. Hoagland and 
Nannie Gale Hoagland, was 
born at Booneville, Missouri, Oc- 
tober 6th, 1845, and in 1852 
came with the family to St. 
Joseph, Missouri, where he has 
continued to reside. His parents 
at the time of his birth were 
members of the Presbyterian 
Church, but soon afterwards 
united with the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. In 1878 
he undertook the management of 
his father's business, which was 
making loans on real estate se- 
curity, continuing in that ca- 
pacity and as vice president of 
the Hoagland Loan and Invest- 
ment Company, until his fath- 
er's death, October 30th, 1903, 
and now is president of said 
company. The writer of this 
sketch has known Theodore 
from his boyhood. As a young 
man he began life with apparent 
robust health and flattering 
prospects for the future, but 
early in life he became the vic- 
tim of rheumatic affection, and 
though employing all available 
methods of relief, the malady 
was not removed, but rather in- 
creased, till, for a number of 
years he has not been able to 
lie down or rise up or enter or 
leave his carriage without as- 
sistance, the latter being a priv- 
ilege he could enjoy only in pleasant weather; yet he has been all these years one of 
the most active business men in the community, in his line. Blessed with strong, clear 
an< * well advanced mental faculties, he has kept well posted with the current interests 
,V ^i* an( * ^tate an d the literature of the day. A wise counselor and sympathizing 
and helpful friend to the needy. His Christian character has been one of beautiful 
development. For thirty years he has not crossed the threshhold of the Church of 
vjoo. Many of these years having no access to any religious service outside of his 
home. Since the advent of the telephone he has had connection with the Francis 
btreet pulpit, which has been a special comfort. He joined the Methodist Episcopal 
a + r ° ' , South ' A P ril 29th > 1881 > under the pastorate of Rev. Enoch K. Miller, D.D. 
l? T he was conv erted, he says: "I can hardly tell when. The seed sown in 
my boyhood days in the home and in the school, and under the preaching of God's 
roasters, gradually grew and bore fruit. I have a deep love for the word of God, 
which, combined with the reading of good, religious books, has increased and strength- 
ened a desire ever to grow better and to be a benefit to my fellowman." His pastor 
has lately requested different laymen to address the congregation upon themes in the 
spiritual interests of the Church, and suggested to Brother Hoagland that he send 
a letter to the Church, as he could not be present in person. He did so, and what a 
letter! He served as chairman of the Building Committee of the recently erected 
Francis Street Church, giving much time and valuable service thereto. The meetings 
oi the Board were generally held in his office. He feels not only great interest in 
the material prosperity of this Church, but prays that through its agencies multitudes 
oi lost sinners, from all the walks of life, may be saved from sin here, and with 
everlasting life in the world to come. 




220 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV SANFORD PRESTON CRESAP. 



Nearness to the risen Lord shows itself in the radiant energy of 
Quenchless love of God and man. — Bishop Hendrix. 



By Rev. Charles C. Grimes. 

Rev. Sanford P. Cresap was 
born April 26, 1869, in St. 
Charles County, six miles from 
St. Charles, Missouri. His fath- 
er, William S. Cresap, was a 
native of Maryland, while his 
mother, whose maiden name was 
White, was from Virginia. 

Brother Cresap was converted 
on February 20th, 1884, during 
a revival in the old Fifth Street 
Methodist Church at St. Charles 
under the ministry of Rev. M. 
L. Gray. Conviction of sin 
came under the preaching of a 
sermon by Brother Gray from 
the text: "Thou art weighed 
in the balance and found want- 
ing," and after a four days' 
struggle he made an uncondi- 
tional surrender to God, and 
was received into the church 
March 2, 1884. At the time of 
his conversion he felt called to 
preach the gospel and all sub- 
sequent events have been shaped 
by this most important crisis 
in his life. "Since that time," 
he writes, "I have studied con- 
stantly, but not always with 
equal concentration and pur- 
pose, to know more of God. I 
think I have grown in grace 
and in love to God and man." 

Brother Cresap received his 
early education in the public 
schools and St. Charles College. 
Later he attended Central Col- 
lege, graduating from three schools there and during the winter of 1901 he was a stu- 
dent in the American School of Classic Studies, Rome, Italy. 

He was licensed to preach by the St. Charles Quarterly Conference April 11, 
1887, Rev. J. A. Snarr being the preacher in charge, and Rev. J. S. Allen the Presid- 
ing Elder. In the summer of 1892 the same Quarterly Conference recommended him 
to the Annual Conference for admission on trial and he was admitted at the session 
which met at Montgomery City the following September, Bishop Galloway presiding. 
During the same session he was ordained Deacon by Bishop Galloway, and he was 
ordained Elder by the same bishop at Hannibal, in 1896. 

On December 27, 1894, Brother Cresap was married to Miss Sarah Martha Payne, 
a daughter of Rev. Moses U. Payne. 

Brother Cresap has had gratifying success in the work of the ministry. His 
Conference has called him to important stations, and in 1906 sent him as a delegate 
to the General Conference at Birmingham, Alabama. In addition to the year (1901) 
spent abroad in study and travel he has served the following appointments in the 
order named: Gooding and Spruce street, St. Joseph; Maryville; Moberly; Columbia; 
and Francis Street, St. Joseph. During his pastorate at Columbia a stone church 
was built costing $33,600.00, and under his direction the new Francis Street Church 
in St. Joseph was completed and paid for. As a student who has derived the greatest 
inspiration for his life from studies in the life of Christ, and he is an enthusiastic ad- 
vocate of Christian education and his words on this subject sum up the duty of 
Missouri Methodists: 

"We must stand by our Central College in order that our Missouri Methodism, in 
the ministry and laity, may be intelligent, religious and effective." 





taMl^Jirj^^iS&^JrM^ %H^Tg SSgftJSSSL the pastorate of Rcv ' Dr - c ' >L Bishop and complcted by R;v - s - p - Cresa >- The 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 221 



JOHN WESLEY 



THE POWER OF A GREAT PERSONALITY. 



By Bishop E. R. Hendrix. 

Carlyle uttered at once a great truth and stinging rebuke when he said: "No 
sadder proof can be given of our littleness than disbelief in great men." Our own 
ability to inspire others is measured by our ability to be inspired by others. Contact 
with nobler natures arouses the feeling of unused power and quickens the conscious- 
ness of responsibility. Where there is no such sense of unused power aroused by 
contact with noble and great natures, there is evidence of a mental and spiritual satura- 
tion point having been reached which tells of hopeless limitation. When a great 
nature cannot inspire, nothing can. God speaks to men in men, now in the prophets and 
now in his Son. Those who will not believe Moses and the prophets will not be per- 
suaded though one rose from the dead. Ghosts cannot do what saints fail to do. 
Unless there be genuine love of the truth, there will never be genuine obedience of the 
truth. Fear is the law of life of devils, who see nothing good in God or man. Love 
of the good both in God and man sways both saints and angels. Satan sneers, "Does Job 
serve God for naught?" while the good God challenges the world to consider a perfect 
and an upright man whose name is a familiar one in the court of heaven. The whole 
question of whether there be great and good men involves the question, Who can show 
us any good? and as to whether there can be a new heaven and a new earth wherein 
dwelleth righteousness, a fitting abode for such noble souls. A commonplace world is 
good enough for men without pride in a noble ancestry or hope of a worthy posterity. 
Men must receive power to become the sons of God. They receive power as they 
exercise faith in the highest. Christ, who taught faith in God, ever taught faith in men. 
"He that heareth you heareth me; and he that rejecteth you rejecteth me; and he that 
rejecteth me rejecteth Him that sent me." Whenever God sends his messenger into the 
world, happy are they who are prepared to know and welcome him. 

The education of the race is due to the domination of the superior mind; and, as 
Emerson suggests, "Nor will the Bible be closed until the last great man is born." 
History at best is biography. Great men whose biographies make up the history of the 
world are not so numerous as to require more than one Hall of Fame for every nation. 
The choicest spirits are those whose names appear in the hearts of all men and of 
every people. They are kindred spirits who are our contemporaries, despite the cen- 
turies since they ceased to talk with men. Death has fastened rather than loosened 
the grasp of these mighty spirits who rule us from their urns. The longer the world 
lasts, the more it is ruled by its mighty dead. Longfellow ever wrought under the 
eye and guidance of Dante. Tennyson dies with a copy of Shakespeare in his hand. 
Angelo and Raphael have more pupils today than when the one swung the Pantheon 
in air as the dome of St. Peter's and the other was followed to his grave by the throng 
of artists who bore his "Transfiguration" in the funeral train as his most daring con- 
ception and greatest achievement. Homer is greater today than when his immortal 
epics were known only in Greece. Hamilton and Jefferson have more followers today 
than when they taught their political philosophy from their places as trusted advisers 
of Washington. John Marshall is mightier in our jurisprudence as the great Chief 
Justice than when his lucid and able constructions of the constitution began to give 
stability to our government. Paul, Luther, Wesley are greater than when their epistles 
or theses or journals were first given to the world. It is not only a larger world 
that they now influence (its population having doubled since Wesley began his public 
career), 'but its facilities of communication have so multiplied that knowledge is now 
shared by the many. During the entire century that gave us John Wesley and John 
Howard, each in his way alike an evangelist and philanthropist, the facilities of travel 
were no better than they were in the days of Abraham. The world of our day lays 
the world of every other day under contribution, and hails as its teachers and heroes 
the mighty of all ages. The improvableness of the race is the greater through the 
inspiration which comes from the growing numbers of the mighty dead. 



090 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MRS. LUCY WADE MILLER. 



As the flower has its debt to soil and sun, so soul has its 
Debt to God. — Dr. William A. Quayle. 



Her maiden name was Lucy- 
Wade Farmer, and her parents 
were James A. Farmer and 
Rebecca J. Farmer (nee) Now- 
lin. They emigrated from the 
State of Virginia to Missouri, 
stopped in Ray County for two 
or three years, and then came 
to St. Joseph when the town 
was in its infancy. They were 
Missionary Baptists, her Grand- 
father Nowlin being a Baptist 
preacher. Her father died 
while on a visit to his sister, 
and was buried near Richmond, 
Ray County, Missouri. Several 
years later her mother died, and 
Mount Mora, the beautiful city 
of the dead in St. Joseph, con- 
tains all that was mortal of 
her. Mrs. Miller is the young- 
est of four daughters, all born 
in Virginia, except herself, her 
birthplace being near Richmond, 
Missouri. She was converted 
when eleven years of age under 
the ministry of Rev. C. I. Van- 
Deventer, and joined the Metho- 
dist Church while he was pastor 
of the old Francis Street 
Church which stood on the 
corner of Third and Francis 
Streets, St. Joseph. She was 
assigned to the Wednesday aft- 
ernoon class, and although she 
was attending school at the 
Convent of the Sacred Heart, 
Mrs. Miller was such a thor- 
ough Methodist, loved its teachings and practices so well, she would ask to be excused 
every Wednesday afternoon at three o'clock to attend her class; and how she did enjoy 
those meetings, for the Holy Spirit was truly with them. She can truly say with 
David of old: "The Lord is my strength and my shield, my heart trusted in Him, 
and I^ara helped, therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth; and with my song will I praise 
Him." On the 21st day of December, 1864, she was united in marriage to Mr. Daniel 
C. Miller of Tennessee. God gave them three children, two boys and one girl. The 
death angel claimed her precious girl baby when two years old. Her two sons, Eugene 
Wade Miller, and Perry Clarence Miller, are of great comfort to her as she grows 
older. They are true Methodists, greatly interested in the advancement of the church, 
and are known as the Miller Brothers of Agency, Missouri. Her husband died May 
12th, 1894, at Excelsior Springs, They had gone there hoping the change would 
prove beneficial to his health, but, alas, not so. The dear Lord said to him: "It is 
enough, come up higher." He was a devout Christian, a loving husband and father. 
Oh, how she misses his companionship and wise counsel. But these broken family 
links only serve to make Heaven nearer and dearer to her. 

It is something sweet to think of, in this world of care, 
Though dear friends have left us, their bright spirits are 
Something sweet to think of. Hark! the angels say, 
Call them not back again; they are with you every day." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



223 




REV W- W. REDMAN. 



Life's a debtor to the grave; dark lattice! Letting in eternal 
Day. — Young. 



By Rev. C. I. VanDeventer. 

Rev. W. W Redman was born in what is now Clark County, Indiana, December 
14th, 1799. He was converted at a camp-meeting in Jefferson County, Kentucky, and 
united with the church September 12th, 1817. He was licensed to exhort December 
17th, 1819, and licensed to preach June 10th, 1820, and received on trial m the 
Missouri Conference September 14th, 1820. He was elected secretary of his Con- 
ference fourteen times. He was thirteen years Presiding Elder, and three VoJT 
elected a delegate to the General Conference, including the memorable session of 1844. 
He was a good preacher, studious and devout, and a kind and faithful Presiding Elder 
and pastor, and combined in a large degree the vigor and attractiveness of youth 
with the maturity of advancing years. He died at Danville, Missouri, October 31st, 
1849, in the fiftieth year of his age. The end came suddenly, of heart failure, but 
found him ready. He was very generally and favorably known as an itinerant min- 
ister of the gospel in Missouri for more than twenty-nine years. Having possessed 
naturally a strong constitution and enjoyed generaly, very good health, his l abo fs wer *j 
very extensive, and greatly blessed, in turning many from darkness to light, and 
from the power of Satan unto God, and in building up the Church of Christ. During 
his illness he spoke frequently of his religious conditions and his hopes— that they 
were comfortable; that he was not afraid to die; that he knew in whom he trusted. 
His end was peaceful. "He rests from his labors, and his works do follow him. 



224 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MR. JAMES KAY 



The Holy Spirit's greatest book is a Life. — Bishop Hendrix. 



By Rev. C. I. VanDeventer. 

James Kay, son of James and Sarah Waganal Kay, was born at Culpepper Court 
House, Virginia, November 1st, 1816. Later he moved with the family to the State 
of Tennessee. He was married at Dover, Tennessee, March 3d, 1836, to Miss Eliza 
Bailey, who survives him. Two sons, Rueben and Henry, were born to them, both 
of whom are now deceased. Mr. Kay was converted and joined the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church in 1838, and at its organization became a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He moved with his family to Saint Joseph, Missouri, A. D., 
1851, and died November 11th, 1893, in Saint Joseph, Missouri, having given to the 
Church of his choice forty-three years of unusually faithful and fruitful service. The 
writer of this brief sketch became his pastor in 1852 and in that and other capacities 
was intimate with him to the day of his lamented death. He was first a general 
merchant, and later a wholesale dry goods merchant, in which business he continued 
until retiring from active business. Energetic, enterprising and prosperous, he was 
the soul of honor and integrity in secular life, in the Church he abounded in labors; 
class leader, chorister before the days of pipe organs and choirs, steward, trustee 
and general secretary, a worker in all the departments of the Sunday School and an 
especially happy and successful solicitor as well as contributor for financial aid in 
the interests of the Church he so dearly loved. He watchfully guarded the House of 
the Lord and the parsonage and looked after the interests of the pastor's family 
with constant and loving care. He was upright and faithful in his Christian life, 
and ever-zealous for the purity and success of the Church. He was present and 
participating in all the services of the sanctuary till "age and feebleness extreme" 
prevented. Quick in his movement with character in his walk, prompt, always on 
time and wanting others to be so. Like Zaccheus he was small in stature but big in 
brain and heart. This old, historic church (Francis Street), first and last, has num- 
bered many good men and women of precious memory, whose names are in the 
Book of Life; but there has been only one James Kay. He "went up through much 
tribulation" and "rests from his labors while his works do follow him." 

One of his sons, Rev. Henry Kay, was one of the best men of the Missouri Con- 
ference. He was abundant in labors, and he had a host of friends wherever he served 
as pastor. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



225 




REV JOHN CALHOUN CALDWELL DAVIS. 



Oh, that we might, in our moments of gladness, imitate the 
Blessed in Heaven who, amid their greatest joys, ever associate 
Their happiness with the death of Christ.— Dr. F. B. Meyer. 



Rev. John Calhoun Caldwell Davis was torn, March 24th, 1832, in Lewis County, 
Kentucky. He is a son of Ishmael Davis and Nancy McDonald Davis, both members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted February 21st, 1850, at 
Mount Moriah Church, Buchanan County, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. M. 
R. Jones. He was licensed to preach in 1852, and was admitted into the Missouri Con- 
ference in 1853. He was ordained Deacon, September 30th, 1855, at Richmond, Mis- 
souri, by Bishop John Early; he was ordained Elder by Bishop Robert Paine, Septem- 
ber 18th, 1859, at St. Joseph, Missouri. Between the years 1853 and 1875, the year of 
his dearth, he served the following appointments: Liberty, , Platte City, St. Joseph, 
Weston, Yellow Creek, Kirksville, Richmond, New Market, Rushville, New Market, 
Plattsburg. In 1874 he took a supernumerary relation in connection with the Francis 
Street Church at St. Joseph, Missouri. His ministry was fruitful and many were 
added to the church. Davis Chapel, in Platte County, Missouri, was built during the 
time he was in charge of that work; also the church at Rushville, Missouri. His 
education was received at the public schools of Rock House Prairie and St. Joseph, 
Missouri. He married Miss Mary G. Clay March 26th, 1855, and the names of their 
children are as follows: William Bascom Davis, Frank Claude Davis, Edna Ann 
Davis, now Mrs. Albert M. Ray, Robert Lee Davis, Frances Byrd Davis, now the wife 
of Rev. W F. McMurry, D. D., Marvin Middleton Davis, and Mary Alice Davis. 



226 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



DANIEL MORTON, M. D. 



Let your Culture be as the generous sunlight and the fertilizing 
Showers, falling like the Divine love upon the just and the 
Unjust. — Bishop Candler. 



Dr. Daniel Morton, one of the 
prominent surgeons of St. Jo- 
seph, and widely known as an 
able speaker and writer on 
surgical and historical subjects, 
was born November 25th, 1864, 
at Russellville, Logan County, 
Kentucky, in the Logan Female 
Academy, of which his father 
was at that time president. He 
is the son of Rev. David Mor- 
ton, D .D., and Hannah Wilson 
(Bottomley) Morton, his father 
being the founder of the Church 
Extension Society of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South. 
His ancestors were among the 
pioneers of America, settling in 
Virginia, Maryland and Penn- 
sylvania prior to the Revolution. 
Until 1878 Dr. Morton was a 
student at Bethel College, Rus- 
sellville, Kentucky. After the 
removal of the family to Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, in 1879, Dr. 
Morton entered the High School 
of that city, remaining until 
1882. He was graduated from 
the University of Louisville, 
Medical Department, in 1887. 
The entire winter of 1887-1888 
was spent in attendance on lec- 
tures at Columbia College, New 
York City. Surgery has always 
been his specialty, and he has 
built up a reputation in this 
branch of medicine extending 
not only through the territory 
contiguous to St. Joseph, but over the neighboring states from which he draws a 
very extensive practice. He was appointed assistant surgeon of the St. Joseph and 
Grand Island Railway by Dr. E. S. Garner. On August 1st, 1898, he was appointed 
Chief Surgeon of the St. Joseph and Grand Island Railway, and of the Kansas City 
and Omaha Railway, and served as such until January 1st, 1904. The succeeding years 
continued to be filled with duties of a public character, while a surgical practice ab- 
sorbed his time and energies far beyond that of ordinary practitioners. His contri- 
butions to the Medical press have been numerous and along the lines of medical edu- 
cation and surgery. Aside from these he has also written a biography of his father, 
Dr. David Morton, and a history of the Morton family, entitled, "The Mortons and 
their Kin," as well as a history of the Ladies' Union Benevolent Association for the first 
twenty-five years of its existence. Dr. Morton was married on March 8th, 1894, to Miss 
Fannie E. Johnson. Dr. Morton has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, since the age of twelve years. He is President of the St. Joseph City Church 
Extension Board of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. This Board is doing 
much for the forward movement of Methodism in St. Joseph. Dr. Morton's family has 
held membership at Hundley Church since 1898; his children representing the fifth 
generation in a direct line of Methodists. In addition to the various responsibilities 
associated with so many offices, Dr. Morton has always been ready to perform the 
duties of a good citizen, taking an active interest in all that concerns the welfare 
of St. Joseph. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



227 



REV M. B. CHAPMAN, D. D. 

The world is thy field, make it a garden, strew flowers in the 
Wilderness, and plant the Rose of Sharon in the Desert. — Dr. 
Wm. E. Munsey. 



By Rev. C. I. VanDeventer, 

Rev. Mark Boatner Chapman, 
son of William W Chapman 
and Saluda C. Chapman, was 
born October 22nd, 1846, at 
Clinton, Louisiana. He was 
converted when twelve years 
old and licensed to preach when 
fourteen, and was known 
throughout the South as the 
"boy preacher." At the age of 
sixteen he entered the Confed- 
erate army and was a Chaplain 
during the war. After the war 
he attended the Southern Uni- 
versity at Greensborough, Ala- 
bama. He was admitted on 
trial in the Louisiana Confer- 
ence of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, in 1867, and 
transferred to the Missouri Con- 
ference in the fall of 1868, ana 
appointed to South St. Joseph. 
On the. 13th day of May, 1869, 
he was married to Miss Maggie 
F. Harries of St. Joseph. In 
the fall of 1869 he was stationed 
at Columbia; in 1870, appointed 
to the Chillicothe Station, re- 
maining two years ; in 1872, ap- 
pointed to the Fulton Station. 
His health failing, at the follow- 
ing Conference, in 1873, he re- 
ceived a supernumerary rela- 
tion in connection with the Fran- 
cis Street Station, St. Joseph, 
which relation was continued 
from year to year, to 1881, when 
he was appointed to the Weston 
and Platte City cha-ge. In 1832, 
to the Plattsburg Station; in 1883 and 1884 he was Presiding Elder on the, Plattsburg 
District; appointed to the Columbia Station in 1885, and was a delegate to the Gen- 
eral Conference of 1886. In the fall of 1886, he started on his trip around the 
world, being absent eleven months. In 1887, he was stationed at Hannibal and re- 
turned to the Station in 1888; was re-appointed in 1889, and early in the Conference 
year, was transferred to the Little Rock Conference and appointed to the First 
Church, Little Rock, - where he remained two years. The next four years he was 
Editor of the St. Louis Christian Advocate. Then he was transferred to the Bal- 
timore Conference and appointed to the Trinity Church, remaining three years; 
was then transferred to the" -Louisville Conference and stationed at the Walnut 
btreet Church, remaining three years; from there he was transferred to the South- 
west Missouri Conference and stationed at Troost Avenue Church, Kansas City, 
Missouri, remaining two years, when, on account of failing health, he was trans- 
ferred to the Los Angeles Conference and stationed at Trinity Church, Los Angeles, 
remaining one year. From there he was transferred to the St. Louis Conference and 
stationed at Fredericktown. The next two years he was Presiding Elder on the 
Uiarleston District. In the fall of 1905 he received a superannuated relation to the 
r^ Louis Conference, and during the following year supplied the Hollester Station 
in the Pacific Conference, and in 1906 returned to St. Joseph, Missouri, where he 
now resides. In 1889, he published his "Lands of the Orient," and later his book 
on Archaeology, "Mounds, Monuments and Inscriptions." The degree of D. D. was 
conferred on him by the St. Charles College and also by the Greensborough Univer- 
sity, Alabama, about 1888. 




228 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV C. C. SELECMAN. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 229 



REV CHARLES CLAUDE SELECMAN. 



Nothing more contributes to maintain our common sense than 
Living in the universal way with multitudes of men. — Goethe. 



Rev. Charles Claude Selecman was born October 13th, 1874, in Andrew County, 
Missouri, near Savannah; he is a son of I. H. Selecman and Josephine E. Selecman, 
both staunch members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. As far back as he 
can trace them, his ancestors have all been Methodists. He was converted in 1886, 
at Bedford Chapel, in Savannah Circuit, under the ministry of Rev. D. F, Bone, and 
joined the church at that time. While kneeling at the mourner's bench praying the 
only prayer he knew, "Lord be merciful to me, a sinner," and during the singing 
of that grand old hymn, "I will arise and go to Jesus," the light came into his soul 
and he was very clearly converted. During a subsequent revival, some five years 
later, he surrendered to a call to preach, which he had dimly felt since early child- 
hood. His college days were spiritually helpful, and godly teachers were a great 
blessing to him, especially Prof. J. W. Kilpatrick, who took quite an interest in him 
and manifested his kindness in many ways. He was licensed to preach by the Fayette 
Quarterly Conference, in 1891; Rev. W. A. Hanna, preacher in charge, and Dr. E. K. 
Miller, Presiding Elder; was recommended to the Annual Conference for admission 
on trial by the Gallatin District Conference, in 1898; Rev. J. H. Pritchett, D. D., Pre- 
siding Elder, and was received into the Annual Conference on trial at Memphis, Mis- 
souri, in 1898; Bishop W. A. Candler, presiding; ordained Deacon by Bishop Granbery 
at Fulton, Missouri, in 1900; ordained Elder by Bishop Wilson at Chillicothe, Missouri, 
in 1902. During his college days he served as supply for five months at each of the 
following places: Maryville Circuit, Union Star Circuit, and Jamesport Station. Ap- 
pointments filled are as follows: Pattonsburg Station; Centenary Church, St. Joseph, 
Missouri; Bernard Circuit; Olive Street Church, St. Joseph, Missouri; Mexico Station; 
Conference Missionary Evangelist, being the first in the church to be appointed to 
this new office. About seven hundred persons have been received into the church during 
his ministry. He secured subscriptions to remodel Barnard parsonage, and raised 
quite a large sum, $4,000.00, to make extensive improvements on Olive Street Church, 
St. Joseph, Missouri. He received his education at the Savannah High School, and 
Central College, where he completed the Junior year, and represented Missouri in the 
Interstate Oratorical contest. He was married to Miss Bessie K. Beckner, April 27th, 
1899, and they have two children, Francis Asbury Selecman and Sarah Josephine Selec- 
man. From June, 1906, to September, , 1906, he visited England, Scotland, France, 
Germany and Italy. 



230 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV STANLEY WILLIS HAYNE, A. B. 



There is a mold already prepared in which our new life is to be 
Cast, a holy example of perfect humanity to which we are to be 
Conformed. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. Stanley Willis Hayne 
was born October 11th, 1877, 
in Niagara County, New York. 
He is a son of D. Frank Hayne 
and S. Delia Hayne, both of 
whom were members of the Pres- 
byterian Church, until after he 
entered the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. They are now members 
of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, at Melrose 
Church, Kansas City, Missouri. 
He was converted at Melrose 
Church, Kansas City, in 1894, 
under the ministry of Rev. J. 
W- Howell, and in a meeting 
conducted by Rev. C. M. Haw- 
kins. He joined the church the 
same month, March, in which he 
was converted. He was im- 
pressed by the ministry of the 
word, and the personal influence 
of his Sunday School teacher 
and A. S. Rankin, both of whom 
were active members of the 
church and friends. He gave 
his heart to God and felt a clear 
assurance of faith and accept- 
ance with Him. He feels that 
he has grown in grace since 
1897, from which time he has 
tried to be faithful. He was 
licensed to preach at the regular 
session of the District Confer- 
ence of the Kansas City District 
in June 1898; Rev. C. M. Bishop, 
pastor, and Rev. W T. McClure, 
Presiding Elder; he was recommended to the Annual Conference by the District 
Conference of the Atchison District of the Western Conference held at Potter, 
Kansas, in May, 1899; he was admitted to the Southwest Missouri Conference, on 
trial, in September, 1899, at Neosho, Missouri; Rev. C. H. Briggs, Presiding Elder, 
and Bishop Granbery, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop A. W. Wilson 
at Chillicothe, Missouri, in September, 1902; ordained Elder by Bishop E. R. Hen- 
drix at Columbia, Missouri, in 1894. He has served the following appointments: 
Centenary Church, St. Joseph, Missouri, one year; Spruce Street Church, St. Joseph, 
two years; Savannah Station, three years. One hundred and eighty persons have 
been received into the church under his ministry. He attended the Kansas City 
High School and Central College, Fayette, Missouri, from which he graduated in 
1901. He was married to Miss Jessie Pearl Davis September 7th, 1904. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



231 



REV- WALTER GILWELL BORCHERS, A. M. 



How I would love to rise at the last day in the midst of a 
Multitude of heathen converts! — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. Walter Gilwell Borchers 
was born September 27th, 1876, 
on a farm near Moberly, Mis- 
souri. His parents, B. F. Bor- 
chers and Susan M. Borchers, 
are both members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South. 
He was converted at Pleasant 
View Church, four miles East 
of Cairo, Missouri, under the 
ministry of Rev. E. M. Capp, 
in August, 1893. He was bap- 
tized and received into the 
church at Moberly, Missouri, in 
August, 1894, by Dr. J. H. 
Pritchett. His conversion fol- 
lowed a long struggle with self 
and the devil. He says that he 
knew but little of the things of 
God when he started, but there 
has been so decided an improve- 
ment in his knowledge of His 
word and will and his love for 
Him and those for whom He 
died, that he dare not try to 
tell about it lest he exaggerate 
it. Loving God and man has 
now become the business and 
joy of his life. He was licensed 
to preach by the Mexico District 
Conference, March 28th, 1896; 
Rev. Robert White, preacher in 
charge, and Rev. E. K. Miller, 
D. D., Presiding Elder; was rec- 
ommended to the Annual Con- 
ference for admission on trial 
by the St. Joseph Conference in 
April. 1903, and was received 
into the Annual Conference on trial that same year; Rev. J. A. Mumpower, Presiding 
-Elder, and Bishop Charles B. Galloway, presiding. He Was ordained Deacon by 
Bishop John C. Granbery, September 16th, 1900, at Fulton, Missouri. Most of his 
appointments have been served as supply while working his way through school. 
He served Keytesville Circuit, three months, during vacation; Cairo Circuit, three 
months and one year following; Elmo Circuit, one year; Centenary Church, St. 
Joseph, Missouri, three months, during vacation; Hyde Park Church, St. Joseph, 
two years, with the exception of three months off the last of the second year, when 
he went to Brazil as a Missionary. He has received about one hundred persons into 
the church. The church at Elmo, Missouri, was built under his pastorate and the 
enterprise of building a new church at Hyde Park, St. Joseph, launched before he 
started to Brazil. He attended Moberly High School, Central Academy, and Central 
College, Fayette, Missouri. Some books which have been beneficial to him are "Moody's 
Sermons," "Quiet Talks on Power and Prayer," "Missionary Principles and Practice," 
The Making of a Man," "Paul Crandall's Charge," "Drummond's Addresses," "How to 
Bring Men to Christ," "Soul Winning Stories," and the "Gospel of Life." Brother 
Borchers thinks that without well equipped Christian Colleges to train both the laymen 
and the clergy, the church of the present and the future would find herself unable to 
grapple with the rapidly growing problems ; her affairs would not be wisely directed, 
her ministry would not command the respect of the thinking public, and in the chief 
positions of the business world, where brains are at a premium, she would be with- 
out qualified representatives to prove the practical benefits of having the principles 
of Christianity incorporated in a life. 




232 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JOHN HOLLAND. 



And they that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the 
Firmament; and they that turn many to righteousness as the 
Stars forever and ever. — Daniel. 



By Rev. A. B. Culrertson, A. M. 

Rev. John Holland, the son of 
William and Margaret Holland, 
was born near Hannibal, Mis- 
souri, December 15th, 1857. His 
parents were pious Methodists 
and their precept and example 
served to start their son in the 
right direction. When a lad of 
fifteen years during a series of 
meetings in Park Church, con- 
ducted by Rev. J. H. Pritchett, 
D. D., he was brought under 
powerful conviction for sin, and 
through the suggestion of his 
mother was induced to go to 
the altar and seek pardon. 
After a hard struggle the light 
came, and sweet peace filled his 
soul. He was licensed to preach 
by the Quarterly Conference of 
Arch Street Church, Hannibal, 
August, 1875, and recommended 
to the Missouri Annual Con- 
ference for admission on trial 
August, 1876. In the following 
September the Conference ad- 
mitted him. Bishop D. S. Dog- 
gett ordained him Deacon the 
15th of September, 1878, and 
he was ordained Elder by Bish- 
op George F. Pierce the 18th 
of September, 1881. The High 
School and College of Hannibal 
together with private tutorship, 
constitute his educational ad- 
vantages. His wife's maiden 
name was Miss Emma Fowler. 
They were married September 
18th, 1878. She is a consecrated and efficient woman, and many souls have been 
pointed to the light by her words of instruction. C. F., Minetta, Paul Kendol, and 
John Hort are their children. "Barns Notes on the New Testament," "Tongue of 
Fire," "Life and Times of Jesus" (by Edersheim), "Parables of our Lord" (by 
Marcus Dods) , "The Story of John G. Paton," "The Mind of the Master," "Life and 
Epistles of the Apostle Paul," he has studied with much profit. It may be truly 
said of Rev. John Holland, "He is mighty in prayer." God has used him in the 
conversion of hundreds of souls. Two churches have been built under his direc- 
tion, a number of churches and parsonages have been repaired, — one church on 
his last work at a cost of $2,100.00. His call to the ministry was made a subject 
of prayer, on his knees, under an apple tree in his father's orchard. No doubt as 
to his divine call has ever troubled him. His fields of labor have been Kirksville 
Circuit, one year; Kahoka Mission, one; Troy Circuit, one; Frankford Circuit, two; 
Jonesburg Circuit, three; New Florence Circuit, three; Ashley, one; Prairieville, one; 
Clarksville, two; Clarence, two; Sturgeon, one; Fayette, two; Armstrong, three; 
Keytesville, one; Clifton Hill, three; Clark and Cooper charge, three; Agency, 1907. 
The Christian College is, to his mind, indispensible to both church and state. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— §T. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



233 




REV BRITTON PAYNE TAYLOR, A. M. 



The way to God is by the road of men; 

Find they far Heaven in near humanity. — Arnold. 



Rev. Britton Payne Taylor was born at Reform, Calloway County, Missouri, 
June 1st, 1871; his father, Robert H. Taylor, and mother, Mary E. Taylor, both be- 
longed to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted, November 
26th, 1888, at Reform, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. Willis G. Shackleford. 
All his life he was disposed to think of the religious life seriously, and in a meet- 
ing at Reform in 1887, under the preaching of Rev. Willis G. Shackleford, he was 
convicted of sin, but would not yield until in 1888, in a similar meeting, he was 
saved; he was converted while sitting at home on Sunday afternoon. He has 
grown in grace by doing active work as Sunday School teacher and also in the 
League work, and since he consecrated his life to the ministry, has found his deepest 
joy and greatest growth in the study of the life of Christ. He was licensed to 
preach by the Mexico District Conference at Centralia, Missouri, in April, 1900; 
Rev. Rice H. Cooper, Presiding Elder; was recommended to the Annual Conference 
for admission on trial by the same Quarterly Conference at the same time, and 
was received into the Annual Conference on trial in September, 1900, at Fulton Mis- 
souri; Rev. R. H. Cooper, Presiding Elder, and Bishop J. C. Granbery, presiding; 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, October 15th, 1906, at the New Fran- 
cis Street Church, St. Joseph, Missouri. The appointments which he has served are 
the following: For the Fourth Quarter, (June, July and August), 1901-1902, at 
Lawson Station; 1902-1903, at Lawson Station; 1903-1904, Hundley Station, bt. 
Joseph, Missouri; 1904-1905, Hundley Station, St. Joseph, Missouri; 1905-1906 Hund- 
ley Station, St. Joseph, Missouri; 1906-1907, Hundley Station, St. Joseph Missouri. 
He has received one hundred and ninety-six persons into the church, and the sub- 
scription for the parsonage at Lawson, Missouri, was secured during his pastorate 
there. He attended the public schools, graduated from the Kirksville Normal School 
in 1899, attended Missouri University in summer of 1900, and graduated from Central 
College in 1902. He was married to Miss Carrie E. Turner, June 25th, 1902, and 
they have two children, Iris Sylvia and Mary Caroline. He thinks his conversion has 
been the most imnortant crisis in his life. Some of the books which have helped him 
most are "The Life of Jas. A. Garfield," Poems of Longfellow, Bryant and Words- 
worth, "The Son of Man," and "Theologv of the New Testament." He recommends 
very strongly the Christian College as the one true source from which the cnurcn 
and state must draw real manhood for the promotion of the Kingdom ot God on 
earth. 



234 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- JAMES TODD McDONALD. 



Have ye never read out of the mouths of babes and sucklings 
Thou has perfected praise. — Matthew xxi, 16. 

Joseph Todd, son of Absalom 
and Martha C. McDonald, was 
born June 23rd, 1853, in Ray- 
County, Missouri. His parents 
were Methodists. He was con- 
verted and joined the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, in a 
grove near Lawson in 1868. His 
conversion was clear and bright. 
When nineteen years old he 
met with an accident and was 
unable to walk for six months. 
He reviewed his studies and se- 
cured a certificate, and began 
teaching school and continued 
until 1876. In 1875, was licensed 
to exhort by the Quarterly Con- 
ference of Liberty Circuit, W. 
C. Campbell, pastor in charge, 
at Kearney, Missouri. In Au- 
gust, 1875, was given Local 
Preacher license by the Quarter- 
ly Conference of Polo Circuit 
at Cottonwood Church, T. H. 
Swearingen, pastor in charge. 
He possessed gifts as a revival- 
ist from the beginning. In 1876, 
he conducted a meeting near 
Knoxville and forty persons 
were converted. The same year 
he was recommended by the 
Quarterly Conference of Polo 
Circuit for admission into the 
Missouri Conference and was 
received at Hannibal; W- E. 
Dockery, Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop H. N. McTyeire, presid- 
ing. Was ordained Deacon at 
Kichmond, September 12th, 1880, by Bishop J. C. Keener; and Elder at Plattsburg Sep- 
tember 17th, 1882, by Bishop J. C. Granbery. Served at Rothville, Queen City, Gentry- 
ville, Troy, Prairieville, Kahoka, Maysville, Breckenridge, Jamesport, Lineville and 
Kavenwood. In 1893, desiring to travel as an evangelist, he took a location and held 
a number of successful meetings with many conversions. 

In 1894, he was readmitted and served Briscoe, New Florence, Vandalia, Bow- 
ling Green. During these years about fifteen hundred souls were converted and twelve 
hundred and forty-one joined the church. Also five churches were built and several 
churches and parsonages repaired. 

Having lost the reading vision of one eye, in 1900, at Fulton, he took a super- 
numerary relation and was appointed Superintendent of the St. Joseph District by 
the State Superintendent of the Children's Home Society of Missouri. He has held 
this position for seven years. In 1906, he was left on the effective list and appointed 
Superintendent of the St. Joseph District for "The Children's Home Society of 
Missouri" by Bishop J. S. Key. In this work he has been preeminently successful, 
having provided homes for nearly four hundred children and securing an endow- 
ment of $2,100.00 for the society. His district now ranks as the best in the state. 
He has many friends, especially among the children. 

He was married to Miss Ida B. Henton, May 25th, 1881. He has two lovely 
daughters living, Laura Munsey and MaDonna. Laura graduated in the St. Joseph 
High School June 6th, 1907. She is quite a musician, having been employed as 
pipe organist of the Hundley Methodist Church for nearly three years. MaDonna 
is fifteen years of age and is in the High School. She is a great favorite among 
the young people and is a good worker in the Sunday School and church. His wife 
is the President of the Woman's Home Missionary Society of Hundley Church and 
a member of the Board of the Young Women's Christian Association of St. Joseph, 
Missouri. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 
REV CHARLES WILLIAM TADLOCK, A. M. 



235 



Christianity is Life; it grows, dominates, and takes possession 
Of a soul like the owner of a Palace. — Dr William A. Quayle. 




Rev. Charles Wil- 
liam Tadlock was 
born in Buchanan 
County, Missouri, 
February 11th, 1874. 
He is a son of Birk- 
head Tadlock and 
Martha Tadlock, 
both parents being- 
members of the 
Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He 
was converted in 
1893, under the min- 
istrv of Rev. W. J. 
Parvin, at Mt. Mo- 
riah Church, on Ed- 
gerton Circuit, and 
joined the church the 
same year and at the 
same place. His con- 
version was in the 
old fashioned way. 
He was deeply con- 
victed for several 
days during a revi- 
val meeting, but 
never manifested any 
interest until the 
night of his conver- 
sion. Then he made 
a complete surrender 
of himself to God, 
and God wonderfully 
blessed him. He has 
never doubted his ex- 
perience at that time. 
Since his conversion 
he has grown in 
grace as he has come 
to a better under- 
standing of the Bible- 
Every new truth has 
added strength and 
inspiration to his 

life, and as he has . 

seen the transforming power of the Word on other lives, his faith in its pow- 
er grows stronger. He has always had a deeper hunger for truth, and God is 
graciously satisfying that hunger by His word. He was licensed to preach, April 
12th, 1895, by the Plattsburg District Conference; Rev. R. H. Cooper, Presiding 
Elder, and Rev. W- J. Parvin, preacher in charge. He was recommended to the 
Annual Conference by the St. Joseph District Conference, and was received into 
the Annual Conference in 1899; Rev. W. F. McMurry, D. D., Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop Granbery presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Candler at bt. 
Joseph, Missouri, September 8th, 1901; was ordained Elder by Bishop E . R. Hen- 
drix, September 4th, 1904. He has served the following appointments: Warrenton 
Circuit, two years; Vandalia Circuit, one year; Olive Street, St. Joseph, his pres- 
ent pastorate, 1904-1907. He has received about two hundred persons into the 
church. He attended the public schools and graduated from Central College, in 
1901. He was married to Miss Cora Elizabeth Karns, October 7th, 1903, and one 
little boy was born to them, who has since died, Reginald K. Tadlock. He thinks 
the most important crisis in his life was when he felt the call to the ministry, tie 
had planned another course, and it was only after a conflict that he surrendered 
and entered the ministry. 



236 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV MARION MOORE. 

Non solo pane vivet homo, sed ex quovis verbo prodeunte per 
Os Dei. — Jesus. 

Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that 
Proceedeth out of the mouth of God. 

Rev. Marion Moore, son of 
Wesley T. Moore and Ledotia 
Moore, was born near Louisa a 
Lawrence County, Kentucky. 
Both parents were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South; they were old fashioned 
Christians, always held family 
prayer in the evening and occa- 
sionally getting happy and 
shouting. He was converted 
when only six or seven years 
old. He is very certain that the 
witness of the Spirit was given 
him at that time. His conver- 
sion was due to the gracious in- 
fluences that surrounded him at 
that age. His father's house 
was at that time the preaching 
place. For some years after his 
conversion he was a backslider, 
but was reclaimed when about 
eighteen years old through the 
agencies of the Sunday School, 
the Bible and his uncle, David 
Moore. He united with the 
church soon after he was re- 
claimed and very soon there- 
after was put to work as Sun- 
day School Superintendent and 
class leader. He was licensed to 
preach in the spring of 1883 by 
Quarterly Conference of Blaine 

Circuit, Catlettsburg District, 

Western Virginia Conference; Rev. C. Dean was preacher in charge and Rev. S. F. 
McClung was Presiding Elder; was recommended for admission on trial into the 
Western Virginia Annual Conference in the fall of 1883, by the same Quarterly 
Conference and the same body of men; was received on trial in the Western Vir- 
ginia Conference at Hutington, Virginia, in 1883; Rev. Fletcher Golden, Presiding 
Elder, and Bishop J. C. Granbery, presiding; ordained Deacon by Bishop J. C. 
Keener at Ashland, Kentucky, October 17th, 1885; ordained Elder by Bishop Robert 
K. Hargrove September 6th, 1891, at Maryville, Missouri. Appointments served: 
Hawksnest Circuit, Western Virginia Conference, 1883-1885; Elmo Circuit as supply 
from April till September, 1889; Fairfax Circuit, 1889-1891; Savannah, 1891-1892; 
in 1892 transferred to the Indian Mission Conference, but finding that the Missouri 
Conference did not have enough preachers to supply the work, he had this transfer 
canceled, and at the ensuing Indian Mission Conference he was assigned to Ard- 
more, Indian Territory; he preached that year and the one following, 1892-1894, at 
Skidmore, Missouri; Mound City Circuit, 1894-1896; Wakenda Circuit, 1896-1898; 
Guilford Circuit, 1898-1899; New Hampton Circuit, 1899-1901; Edinburg Circuit, 
1901-1902; Union Star Circuit, 1902-1904; Fairfax Circuit, 1904-1906; his present 
work is Barnard Circiut. About four hundred and fifty persons have been received 
into the church during his ministry. He has assisted very materially in buying and 
paying for several churches and parsonages. His education was received at the 
common schools in Lawrence County, Kentucky, also at a Baptist Institution in John- 
son County Kentucky, and the Wesleyan College at Millersburg, Kentucky. He en- 
tered Vanderbilt University in 1885 as a Biblical student and completed the English 
Theological course in 1888. He was married to Miss Eva L. Bolen. May 23rd, 1893, 
and they have five children, viz: Eva L., Robert Paul, Helen D., Wesley Bolen and 
Marion Moore. Probably his reclamation from sin when eighteen years old has 
been the most important crisis in his life. He believes the Christian College is an 
absolute necessity for the permanence and success of both church and state. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT 



237 



REV DAVID RICE SHACKLEFORD. 



And only the heart which has sympathy with spiritual things 
Can recognize their full meaning. — Dr. Cunningham Geikie. 



/ 




\ 



.:'.; 



t 



David Rice, son of Willis 
Green and Louisa Henderson 
Shackelford, was borr. March 2, 
1834, near Danville, Montgom- 
ery County, Missouri. His fath- 
er, while being a man of exem- 
plary character, was not a mem- 
ber of any church. His mother 
was a devout Methodist. 

After making the most of the 
educational advantages offered 
by the public schools of his na- 
tive county, a Grammar School 
and a brief stay in Howard 
High School, Brother Shackei- , 
ford entered the training school 
of the early itinerant — "Brush 
College." That he made good 
use of his time is shown by the 
books that have been the com- | 
panions of his ministry: "Wat- ; 
son's Institutes," "Smith's Har- 
mony of the Divine Dispensa- 
tions," "Geike's Work s," 
"Smith's Sacred Annals," and 
"Clark's Commentary." 

In June, 1851, Brother Shack- 
elford attended a meeting held 
on the old Bethel Campground, 
near the line between Montgom- 
ery and Callaway Counties. Al- 
ready interested in his religious 
welfare, he soon came under 
strong conviction of sin, gave 
his heart to God and united 
with the church; Rev. Jesse Sut- 
ton being the preacher in charge 

S^Bl^^sSSS^SiB event and of his subsequent experience he g says : 
"My conviction was very clear, and while my experience has not been _of the ecste tic 
character, and I have felt myself growing ma knowledge of ^ d vV*™?H a tiSn of 
please God in all things, and a deeper love for my fellow men. My appreciation ol 
Divine things grows more precious as my years advance. ..„._,„] 

A question which involved the great crisis of Brother Shacklef ord s hf e occurred 
in the settlement of his call to the ministry. Deciding to enter this work, he was 
licensed to preach and recommended to the Annual Conference lor admission on trial 
by the Quarterly Conference of the Danville Circuit in August, 1856 « ev - £. *• 
Sears, pastor in charge, and Rev. N. G. Berryman, Presiding Elder. He was admitted 
to the Conference thl next month at the session which met m L oms ana Misscmn 
Bishop Pierce presiding. He was ordained Deacon at Chilhcothe m 1858 by Bisnop 
Early, and ordained Elder at St. Charles in 1860 by Bishop Kf v ^ugh Mitc hell 

On November 13, 1860, Brother Shackleford was married to Miss Eleanor . MitchelL 
Four children were given to this union: Joseph Lee, Kate Elizabeth, Mary Louisa 

aild During his king ministry he received into the church over a thousand members and 
assisted in the erection of a number of churches and parsonages ^f^VmiliteJV 
ference. In 1864 he was silenced from preaching for several months by the mihtory 
authorities and he located for two years in 1879. In 1897, ^e superannu^ ha^g 
served the following charges in the order given: Carrollton C ^l^ w ^^l 
sion; Parkville; Weston; Savannah; Colony: St. Loins Circuit: R ^ 01 ^'^^'^ 
Plattsburg; De Kalb; Platte City; Hydesburg; Shelbma; Clarence Savannah bt 
Joseph Circuit; Bloomington; Pleasant Grove; Albany Circuit; ^ 
Dewitt; Clifton Hill; Glasgow Circuit: Monroe City Circuit; Sprmghill, Kusnvme, 
Barnard; Mound City; Spruce Street, St. Joseph. 



238 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV ARAS BISHOP COX, M. D. 
AT AGE OF 91. 



The hand of our God is upon all them for good that seek Him. 

— Ezra. 



Dr. Aras Bishop Cox was born in Floyd County, Virginia, the 25th day of January 
1816, and died at the home of his son, Dr. C. B. W Cox, near Brewster, Blaine County, 
Nebraska, on the 30th day of January, 1907, being ninety-one years and five days old, 
and had been a practicing physician and Methodist minister for sixty-five years. The 
subject of this sketch was licensed to preach by Rev. Mr. Catlett, Presiding Elder in 
Virginia, in 1842. He was ordained for the office of Deacon in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, Holston Conference, by Bishop James 0. Andrew, on the 24th day of 
October, 1847, at Jonesborough, Tennessee. He was ordained to the office of an Elder 
by Bishop John Early, at Marian, Virginia, on the 26th day of October, 1857. He was 
married to Miss Phebe Edwards in Allegheny County, North Carolina, February 23rd, 
1845. In 1861, he entered the Confederate army as Captain of Company "A," 12th 
Regiment, North Carolina Volunteers. He also commanded a company from Allegheny 
County, North Carolina, and later was appointed Chaplain of the 12th Regiment of 
North Carolina Volunteers. He was under Colonel, later General, J. J. Petigrew, and 
served to the close of the war. He came West in 1868, and settled at Hamburg, Iowa, 
in 1869. He was associated in the practice of medicine and surgery for a number of 
years with Dr. Bray. He organized the first Methodist Class in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, at Hamburg, Iowa. He was instrumental in building a church edifice at 
this place, which was dedicated by Rev. Dr. Miller, of Missouri, in the summer of 
1871. He joined the Missouri Conference and was circuit rider on the Hamburg and 
Rockport Circuits. He assisted in building Cox's Chapel on the Hamburg Circuit, in 
Atchison County, Missouri. He moved to Madison, Nebraska, in 1882, engaged in the 
practice of medicine, and preached regularly Sabbath days in country school houses 
and churches in the town. In 1885, he moved to the "Loud Country," afterward Blaine 
County, Nebraska, with his wife and three sons, Edward M. Cox, Charles B. W Cox 
and Albert S. A. Cox, engaging in the practice of medicine and continuing to preach, 
as was his custom on Sabbath days. He was totally blind for three years, until Dr. 
Gifford, an eminent occulist of Omaha, removed a cataract from his eyes. In his eighty- 
fifth year he wrote a history entitled, "Foot Prints on the Sands of Time," and several 
hundred copies were published. He was a great admirer of Dr. D. R. McAnally, 
and he could not remember when the St. Louis Christian Advocate was not in his home. 
Dr. A. B. Cox was endowed with a strong, aggressive nature, and to some degree was 
prejudiced, as are most men of strong character and sterling princime. He was a man 
endowed with strong mental powers. He believed in the "old South" and never changed 
his views. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



239 




DR. A. B. COX, 

AGE 58. 
Chaplain of Confederate Army. 



DR. A. B. COX, 

AGE 38. 



240 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV WILLIAM LOUIS SCARBOROUGH. 



Not what I have, but what I do, is my kingdom. — Carlyle. 



Rev. William Louis Scarborough, son of Richard A. Scarborough and Rebecca A. 
Scarborough, was born in Albany, Missouri, December 22nd, 1871; both parents were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted at Albany, 
Missouri, in 1885, under the ministry of Rev. J. W Keithly, and joined the church the 
same night at that place. He was induced to go to the altar by a sister and was happily 
converted in the old fashioned way. His growth in grace has been steady, but his dis- 
position to do God's will grows stronger each day, and his love for men's souls is pro- 
portionately increased. He was licensed to preach by the Gallatin Distrct Conference 
at Lineville, Iowa, in April, 1897; Rev. E. C. McVoy was preacher in charge and Rev. 
Z. M. Williams, D. D., Presiding Elder; was recommended to the Annual Conference 
for admission on trial by the same District Conference at Lineville, Iowa, in April, 
1897, and was received into the Annual Conference on trial in 1897, Rev. Z. M. Wil- 
liams, D. D., Presiding Elder, and Bishop Fitzgerald presiding; was ordained Deacon 
by Bishop J. C. Granbery at Fayette, Missouri, September 3rd, 1899, and ordained 
Elder by Bishop W A. Candler at St. Joseph, Missouri, September 8th, 1901. Appoint- 
ments filled are as follows: Lock Springs Circuit, one year; Union Star Circiut, 
three years; Lineville Station, four years; Gooding, St. Joseph, Missouri, two years. 
He built the church at Union Star, Missouri. His education was received at the High 
School of Albany, Missouri. He was married to Miss Lurah Lee Kirtley, November 
30th, 1902. His submission to God's will in entering the ministry has probably been 
the most important crisis in his life. He considers the Christian College of vital im- 
portance and the hope of the church for the future. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— ST. JOSEPH DISTRICT. 



241 




REV- BENJAMIN ROBINSON BAXTER. 



This then is the message which we have heard of Him, and 
Declare unto you, that God is light, and in Him is no darkness 
At all. — St. John. 



By Rev. C. I. VanDeventer. 
Rev. Benjamin Robinson Baxter, son of Stephen and Ann Gray Baxter, was born 
in Clay County, Missouri, July 10th, 1824. His parents were members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, and at its organization united with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He was converted and united with the church in his sixteenth year 
and was licensed to preach and recommended to the Annual Conference for admission 
on trial in 1844, by the Liberty Circuit Quarterly Conference ; Rev. W. W Redman 
being Presiding Elder, and the Rev. E. M. Marvin, preacher in charge. His first ap- 
pointment was to the Savannah Circuit as junior preacher, remaining in the Savannah 
District till 1848, when he was transferred to the Indian Mission Conference, and 
back to the Missouri Conference in 1852. He was ordained Deacon in 1846, by Bishop 
Paine, and Elder in 1848, by Bishop Andrew, and from this time until 1860, his 
appointments were to the Savannah Circuit, Savannah District and Oregon Circuit, 
where he located. He was married to Miss Ellen Angeline Tate, April 27th, 1847. To 
them were born fourteen children, (three pairs of twins); nine of the children hav- 
ing died, five in infancy. His widow and five children survived him. Brother Baxter 
was more than ordinarily promising at the beginning of his ministry, and he rapidly 
developed into a leading and popular preacher. Soon after his location in 1860, on 
account of the war troubles in Missouri, he went West, being connected in his trip 
with the noted "Russell" Freighting Company. But he continued to magnify his 
office as a Christian minister, often preaching from the rear of one of the Company's 
wagons, and at Denver, where they tarried some time, large congregations flocked to 
near him. In 1865, he moved with his family to Helena, Montana, where he was en- 
gaged in Missionary work for three years. In 1869, he was re-admitted into the 
Columbia Conference and again located in 1875, remaining in active, useful service 
till his death, January 17th, 1894, at his home in the Willemette Valley, Oregon. His 
end was peace and triumph. He told his beloved wife there was not a cloud between 
him and his Lord. First and last he was instrumental in doing much good. His ser- 
vices were in special demand from the beginnig, and no doubt many will rise up in 
the last day and call him blessed. His godly parents lived in the bounds of my first 
circuit. We were members of the same Conference Class. His convictions were strong 
and his friendship ardent, and we loved each other to the end. May the seeds of 
gospel truth, sown by him in all of the fields of his eventful life, produce abundant 
fruit, and may we meet again in the New Jerusalem. 



242 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE. 




REV A. P. PARKER, MISSIONARY TO CHINA. 



1 806— CENTENNIAL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 



GALLATIN DISTRICT. 



Presiding Elder 
Gallatin Station. 
Jamesport Station, 
Jamesport Circuit 
Albany Station. 



. H. L. Davis 

H. B. Anderson 

. G. A. Stanton 

To be supplied 

.J. A. Snarr 



Union Star Circuit. .Sup by S. A. Smart 
Maysville Station. .p. M. Cain 

Weatherby Circuit. .J. M. Tinnell 

Eagleville Ct.. .Sup. by G. W. Trotter 
New Hampton Ct.. .R. F. Davis 

Denver Ct.. ... . S. D. Gose 



Lineville Sta. . 

Lineville Ct 

Edinburg Ct. . 
Lock Springs Ct. 
Breckinridge Ct. . 



.J. W. Tanquary 

Sup. by W C. Jackson 

.0. Blackburn 

...To be supplied 

.C. B. Campbell 



Supernumerary, J. L. Taylor 

Spring Hill Ct J. C. Carney 

Pattonsburg Ct.. .J. A. Medley 

McFall Ct.. W. A. Chapman 

Jameson Ct.. ... .M. F. Crowe 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— GALLATIN DISTRICT. 



243 



REV HOWARD LORENZO DAVIS. 



Man never thinks as when the Spirit of God holds him with 
Some great Truth. — Bishop Hendrix. 

By Rev. T. H. B. Anderson, D.D. 
We put into the galaxy of 
names and faces found in this 
volume that of our beloved Pre- 
siding Elder, Rev. H. L. Davis. 
His parents, Harvy S. and 
Nancy H. Davis, were Virgin- 
ians; both are living in Hunne- 
well, Shelby County, Missouri. 
Howard L., subject of this 
sketch, was born in Highland 
County, Virginia, April 8th, 
1860. He was converted in 
1875, Oak Dale, Missouri, Rev. 
Thompson Penn, pastor, and be- 
came a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church; South, at that 
meeting. His conversion was 
manifestly of the New Testa- 
ment type, as he has become a 
stalwart in the Kingdom and pa- 
tience of Jesus Christ. 

He was licensed to preach by 
the Quarterly Conference of 
Hunnewell Circuit, held at An- 
drew Chapel, August 23rd, 1884, 
Rev. Wm. Rush, D.D., P.E., and 
Rev. H. W. James, P.C. At the 
same time and place he was rec- 
ommended to the Annual Con- 
ference for admission on trial. 
The Conference met this time at 
Shelbina, September 17th, 1884, 
with Bishop Linus Parker pre- 
siding. Two years later he was 
ordained deacon at St. Joseph, 
Missouri, by Bishop H. N. Mc- 
Tyeire; Elder, September 9th, 
1888, at Gallatin, by Bishop E. . , . p 

R. Hendrix. He has traveled Missions and Circuits filled Stations, and is now ^ Pre 
siding Elder of the Gallatin District. He had added to the Church a goodly number 
of members; has built churches and been helpful otherwise financially. 

His literary acquirements were not lacking. He attended Shelbyville High ^hooi 
Central College and St. Charles College— all Missouri schools. He has improved the 
time since; never reads an indifferent book; has a well selected library, and is 
constantly adding to it new books— the latest and best. He has a strong ^as? on 
the doctrines of the Church, and knows how to preach them. His mind is logical, 
the major and minor premise are before you as he delivers the message. p „„;,!« 

He was married September 12th, 1888, to Miss Etta f Trussell, B g Rapids, 
Michigan. She belongs to the Marys, Dorcases and Lydias of the Bible, bixcnimrwi 
were born unto them: Hendrix Davis, Florence Davis, Ruth Davis, Wilbur Davis 
Raymund Davis and Howard Davis, Jr. Brother Davis possesses characteristics tnat 
make him a remarkably useful minister; is a true man; his friendships are renam. e, 
he stands squarely with his brethren; he wages unceasing warfare against vice 
stupidity and selfishness. Our brother has developed largely the fitter eg™, tus 
heart never beats feebly; his blood never moves sluggishly; his pulse ideates goou 
health, courage and constancy. The saloon, gambling hell, Sabbath desecration and 
other evils destroying our boys and girls have found him an unrelenting 1Q e. 

He was a faithful pastor; no pains spared to improve spiritual conditions a 
believer in revivals, God gave him times of refreshing. No minister is further removea 
from ritualism. He improved church property, increased salaries, and let t ms sue 
cessor invariably a thoroughly organized church. This is his first year as rresia mg 
Elder, but the harness sets snugly, and he is giving great satisfaction. He is meeting 
fully the expectation of all who knew him. 




244 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. THOMAS HART BENTON ANDERSON, D.D. 



We are only strong as we are good; we only universalize the 
Gospel as we make it beautiful, in temper, spirit, benevolence, 
Sympathy and love. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 

By Bishop 0. P. Fitzgerald. 

What shall we call him? He 
has so many titles that it is not 
easy to answer this question. 
When I first knew him he was 
a boy preacher in California. 
Then he was '"Bent" Anderson, 
almost beardless, lively, progres- 
sive. Afterwards he was pas- 
tor, presiding elder, chaplain, 
college president, and doctor of 
divinity. All these titles belong 
to him legitimately. But there 
is one that looks better to me 
on the printed page than all of 
these put together. Brother An- 
derson is that name which looks 
best and gets closest to the 
hearts of his brethren. The 
name given him at his birth tells 
the story of his nativity. The 
man child thus named was born 
in Missouri when the massive, 
big-brained old Senator was in 
his prime, and was already rec- 
ognized in some degree as the 
apostle of metallic currency and 
territorial expansion. They 
never made Benton President of 
the United States, but he looks 
bigger in the historical per- 
spective standing flat-footed on 
his record as a public man than 
would a score of the little poli- 
ticians that have been lifted into 
that high office by party machin- 
ery, even though they should all 
be put together. Let me now 
lift my hat to the colossal old 
Missouri statesman, while at the same time I would send a greeting to the "Bent" 
Anderson whose rising into celebrity as a preacher was observed by me in California 
in the long ago, in which we are both looking back with hearts that are tender. His 
sun is sinking to a peaceful setting among those Missourians who are the children 
of sturdy fathers who had strong convictions, and of praying mothers who made 
Bethels of their moving tents as they journeyed westward as pioneers. 

"Bent" Anderson's rise as a preacher was rapid in California. He had both the 
swing and sweep of the old Missouri Methodist fathers, and the electric touch of young 
California. 

He was born in Chariton County, Missouri, on May 26th, 1842. The names of 
his parents were Josiah and Rachel Anderson, both of whom were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted near Eagleville, Harrison 
County, Missouri, in July, 1856, the Rev. E. K. Miller, D.D., preaching the sermon. 
The same day he joined the Church on probation. His conversion was of the kind 
that our fathers called "powerful." "I never doubted it," he said. Thirty-three years 
afterward he had an experience which gave him greater peace, clearer light, and 
deeper love. He held to the Wesleyan doctrine of Christian Perfection as preached by 
the fathers of Methodism. The degree of D.D. was conferred upon him in 1882, by 
the Military College of Kentucky. Wfie chaplain to the Senate of California in 1868; 
Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. M., 1880-83; Grand Orator, 1885; chairman of Committee 
on Foreign Correspondence, etc. He has received into the Church about 2,000 members. 
Filled our best stations in Pacific Conference — Sacramento, San Francisco, Santa Rosa, 
Fresno, Colusa. In Missouri Conference: Richmond, Moberly, Shelbina, now 
Gallatin. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— GALLATIN DISTRICT. 



245 




DR. WILLIAM LEWIS BROSIUS. 



Whoever implants a broad, unselfish sentiment in the heart of a 
Child achieves an immortal work. — Bishop Atkins. 



Dr. William Lewis Brosius, son of George Washington Brosius and Martha L. 
Brosius, was born April 7th, 1853, at Gallatin, Missouri. Both parents were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted in 1861, at Gallatin, 
Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. Joseph Devlin, and joined the Church then and 
there before he was eight years old. He was converted at the old-fashioned mourner's 
bench and peace came to him while on his knees. It is his desire to honor Christ by a 
life growing better and more useful as the years go by. He received his education in 
the common schools of Gallatin, was graduated from the Missouri Medical College, at 
St. Louis, Missouri, and from the Illinois School of Electro-Therapeutics, at Chicago, 
also attended New York Post Graduate School and Hospital, in New York City. He 
was married to Miss Mollie Price at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1882, and they have 
two children, Lou Etta Brosius and William Lewis Brosius. He considers the most 
important crisis in his life was when God for Christ's sake gave him personal evidence 
of His favor. His conversion changed the whole tenor of his life, and enriched it in 
every way. Dr. Brosius has been a factor in the social life of Gallatin, and his family 
is one of the best. He is deeply interested in his Church, and always ready to respond 
to her calls. 



246 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- JACOB ANDREW SNARR. 



The Day of Goodness hastens on to still fuller Glory, and enlarges 
Itself into the splendors of Eternity. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



His parents were William and 
Eliza Snarr. They were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran Church. 
He was born in Shenandoah 
County, Virginia, April 28th, 
1856. He was converted in 1873, 
in a Presbyterian Church, in 
Montgomery County, Missouri, 
during a sermon preached by Dr. 
Lacy, a Presbyterian preacher, 
and in June following joined the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, at High Hill, Mo. A 
brief account of his conversion: 
The preacher likened a sinner to 
one bearing a very heavy burden, 
which was crushing him, and he 
was crying out, as he struggled 
up a steep and rocky way. And 
when urged to let go his load, 
which was bearing him to the 
earth, in response he stooped and 
picked up another stone and laid 
it on his heavy burden. Then I 
saw myself, trusted, and let go 
my burden. His Christian 
growth has been varied with 
sometimes assurances of accept- 
ance with God when not a 
shadow intervened. Mountain 
tops he reached, but could not 
tarry there; try as he would, 
he must descend into valleys, 
where he has dwelt, traveled and 
worked. He can say that his 
faith in his Lord has never 
faltered for a moment. "For 1 
know Him whom I have be- 
lieved." As he loves God he loves men. He was licensed to preach May 11th, 1878, 
by the Quarterly Conference of the Jonesburg Circuit; Rev. J. M. O'Bryen, P.C., and 
Rev. M. R. Jones, P.E. The following Quarterly Conference of the same charge and 
year, recommended him to the Annual Conference for admission on trial. At the 
Annual Conference held in Macon, Missouri, September, 1878, he was admitted on 
trial; Bishop David S. Doggett presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop John 
C. Keener, at Richmond, Mo., September, 1880, and Elder by Bishop John C. Gran- 
bery, Plattsburg, Missouri, September, 1882. He has served the following works in 
order: Queen City Circuit, Memphis Circuit, Hannibal-Arch Street Station, Canton 
Circuit, St. Charles Station, Louisiana Station, Canton Station, Glasgow Station, New 
Franklin Circuit, Macon Station, Chillicothe District, Shelbina Station, Canton Station, 
Macon District, Albany Station. He has received, in his own works, into the Church 
800 members. He has held, in his own charges forty-two revival meetings, and as- 
sisted his brethren in other charges in eighty-four revival meetings. He rebuilt the 
Trinity Church on the Queen City Circuit, also built McKendree Church, and bought 
the parsonage on the Canton Station. He attended the public schools at Jonesburg 
and Montgomery City, and the Shelbyville Seminary, Shelbyville, Mo. He married 
Miss Minnie D. Gray, in Memphis, Missouri, October 14th, 1884. His children are: 
Eugene Gray, who died, aged two years; Myrtle Josephine, Lois Flowers, and Andrew 
Paul Snarr. He was called to the ministry in his boyhood, and it became more em- 
phatic as he grew to young manhood. He never doubted it. He hesitated to obey, 
though not to open rebellion, but wished to get the Lord's consent to substitute one 
of the professions. Brother Snarr is one of our best preachers. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— GALLATIN DISTRICT. 



247 



PROFESSOR WILLIAM H. PRITCHETT, A.M. 



Truth is the provision God has made for the intellect. — Dr. 
James W Lee. 



Professor W. H. Pritchett, A. 
M., is a resident of Kentucky, 
where he has been a citizen for 
the past seven years. For six 
years he has been president of 
Vanderbilt Training School at 
Smith's Grove, Kentucky. On 
April 10th, 1907, he bought at a 
big outlay one of the most de- 
sirable school properties in the 
State of Kentucky — the Louis- 
ville Training School for Boys, 
at Beechmont — the most beau- 
tiful of all the suburbs of Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. He expects to 
make it the model school of Ken- 
tucky; will limit its attendance 
to one hundred, and have a 
most thorough preparatory 
course in connection with mili- 
tary features. Professor Pritch- 
ett is the oldest son of Rev. 
J. H. Pritchett, D. D., for years 
the leading spirit of the Mis- 
souri Conference. The son was 
born December 19th, 1858, and 
so is not yet fifty years of age. 
He graduated from Central Col- 
lege, Fayette, Missouri, in 1880, 
and has constantly taught for 
over a quarter of a century. The 
following memorandum is tak- 
en from the volume, "Notable 
Men of Kentucky"; "President 
W. H. Pritchett, A.M.; Graduate 
Central College, Fayette, Mo., 
1880; Professor Ancient and 
Modern Languages at Howard- rl „ ,„„„. Micqnnri in 

Payne College, 1881; Professor Languages at Pritchett College G asgow, Ml f ou [^ n 
1881-1884; Professor Languages and Sciences at Paynesville Lnstit^ 
President Paynesville Institute, 1886-1892; President Northwest Mis^n College Albany 
Missouri, 1892-1900; President J. M. A. College, Tullahoma J™ eS3 ^ «* £rove 
dent Logan Female College, Russellville, Kentucky 1901-1902 ; President ; Sm th s Grove 
Vanderbilt Training School, Kentucky, 1902-1907." He has thus taught in or been 
president of some of the leading schools m three different ? tet ^ ; The History ot 
Howard County, Missouri, says of him: "He is a man of a ^^J^^tell 
two uncles, eight cousins, three brothers, have all held high positions as J^g e f^ 1 
dents and specialists in this and other states. .President Pritchett is a leader not only 
in college circles, but holds advanced places m his Church and other circles He is 
abreast of the age in which he lives. Keeps up with and a h ? ad A °J *® *^ s . '? f £e 
he lives, and will make his mark, no matter where he goes » A corres P 01 ™ent ot the 
Central Methodist, Louisville, Kentucky, has the following kind words t > say of him 
"He is recognized as one of our best business laymen in the , en1 ; ire Church jui 
Louisville Conference evidently recognizes him as a leader. • ™«t thorough 

the staid old town of Russellville have learned that he is one of the most t horoi i$h 
teachers, most patient disciplinarians, and withal,, one of the strongest minds everjn 
its midst. As an educator, we haven't his superior in this state. Socially, he is at home 
in any circle, yet modest. He has strong religious convictions, as have tm_ men 

yet he is perfectly free from offensive extremes and partisanism Financially, he keeps 
all corners up— never performs his own business m a loose, unsystematic way. in snort, 
he is one of the best all around men to be found anywhere. 




248 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- STEWART SANFORD HARDIN. 



The Ascent of Man is not only the noblest problem which Science 
Can ever study, but the practical bearings of this Theme are great 
Beyond any other on the roll of knowledge. — Drummond. 

The subject of this sketch was 
born in Henry County, Ken- 
tucky, November 16th, 1839. He 
came with his parents, George 
Washington Hardin and Martha 
Sanford Hardin, to Sullivan 
County, Missouri, in 1851. His 
grandfather was Benjamin Har- 
din, of Henry County, Ken- 
tucky. The Hardin family is 
one of the largest and most in- 
fluential families of Kentucky. 
Not only in Kentucky, but in the 
states of Indiana, Illinois and 
Missouri, and some of the other 
nore Western states have mem- 
bers of this family held places 
if responsibility in state and 
church. 

Mr. Hardin was converted at 
he age of fourteen; licensed to 
preach in December, 1859, by the 
Quarterly Conference of the 
Milan Circuit, with Rev. E. A. 
Sears, P.E., and Rev. Isaac Nay- 
lor, P.C. He joined the Missouri 
Conference at Weston, Mo., Sep- 
tember, 1868; located in 1870, 
and entered Conference again in 
September, 1876. He was or- 
dained local Elder at the same 
Conference by Bishop McTyeire, 
having been ordained local Dea- 
con by Bishop Kavanaugh at 
Weston in 1868. Before joining 
Conference he taught several 
terms of school, which served as 
a good introduction into public 
life. During his itinerant career he served the following charges: Lineville, Milan, 
Edinburg, Jamesport, Lorraine, Jameson, Missouri City, Platte City, Pattonsburg and 
Breckenridge. During his twenty-two years of service, he spent nineteen of them in 
only one Presiding Elder's District. Again, he served three separate pastorates at 
Lineville, two separate pastorates at Jameson and also at Jamesport, showing that he 
had wearing qualities with the people he had served and that they sought him again. 
Such a record with a Methodist preacher is rather unusual. Very few will have 
served in so small a territory for so long a time. Within this territory will be found 
hundreds who came into the Church under his ministry, for he was usually very suc- 
cessful in his meetings. 

From his boyhood, he was an omnivorous reader. He has perhaps read more 
books than any other man of his age in the state. He has been a hard and patient 
student all his life. Having given his chief attention to his professional studies, he is 
one of the very best informed theoloeians. His sermons are always strong and force- 
ful — one of the ablest thinkers of his Conference. In disposition he is retiring and 
timid, disliking notoriety in a marked degree. 

Preferring the Presbyterial to the Episcopal form of church government, in 1895 
he withdrew from the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and united with the Cum- 
berland Presbyterian Church, serving since then various congregations of this Church 
within the bounds of the Chillicothe Presbytery. He has been twice chosen to represent 
his Presbytery in the General Assembly. In September, 1906, he moved to Texas 
County, Missouri, near Cabool, where he now lives on his farm. He has been a con- 
tributor to various periodicals all his life, but especially to church periodicals. 

In 1861 he was married to Miss Esther Ann Kinney, who is a native of Missouri. 
To this union was born five children: Melville Coxe, Arthur Bascom, Leonidas Marvin, 
Erne Erdeen, Charles Bledsoe, all of whom are living at this date except the last 
named, who died at six years of age. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— GALLATIN DISTRICT. 



249 




REV JOHN EDWIN SQUIRES. 



Because Christianity develops the higher Personality, it is the 
Religion of Progress. — Bishop Rendrix. 



Rev. John Edwin Squires was born in Carroll County, Missouri, near DeWitt, 
July 15th, 1855. He is a son of John Squires and Sarah J. Squires. He grew up 
on a farm near Bedford, Missouri, where he was converted in 1877, under the min- 
istry of Rev. R. H. G. Keeran, and shortly after was licensed to preach by Dr. J. P. 
Nolan; Rev. H. Leeper, being pastor in charge. He attended Central College and later 
Vanderbilt University, where, in 1883, he completed the English and Theological course, 
taking the founder's medal for excellence in scholarship in that Department. His first 
appointment was Arch Street, with Dr. W. M. Rush, Presiding Elder. At his next 
appointment, Kirksville, Missouri, he was married to Miss Cassie A. Gilliam of Rock- 
port, Missouri, by Dr. Wesley G. Miller, then pastor of Francis Street Church, at St. 
Joseph, Missouri. They have six children, all in the parsonage home at this time. 
From Jamesport, he was transferred to the Denver Conference by Bishop Hendrix, and 
two years later, by the same authority, to the Montana Conference, where he spent 
the six following years. Ten years ago he went to California, and from Stockton charge 
was sent to San Francisco, his present work, at the last session of the Pacific Confer- 
ence. He has been identified with the Interdenominational work of the Kingdom during 
the past fifteen years, and is now a member of the Civic Betterment Federation of San 
Francisco, of the Anti-Saloon League, and is President of the California Sunday School 
Association. The men who have most influenced his ministerial life, in the order . of 
time and of value, are: Rev. H. H. Craig, Dr. J. P. Nolan and Bishop E. R. Hendrix. 
His personal experience has often been most enriched by the fellowship of humble men 
and women whose pastor he has been. He says if he had many lives to live, all of them 
would be given to the Christian ministry. 



250 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV WILLIS GREEN SHACKLEFORD. 



The highest work of our Holy Religion is simply to make us 
Men. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. Willis Green Shakleford was born near Danville, Missouri, in 1836. His 
parents, W. G. Shackelford and Louisa Ann Shackelford, were both members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted in 1851, under the ministry 
of Rev. Jesse Sutton, and joined the Church at that time. He was converted at the 
old Bethel Camp Ground during a severe thunder storm, and the testimony of his 
acceptance with God was very clear. His growth in grace has been constant, and he has 
realized much of the things of God and a love more perfect to God and man. He was 
licensed to preach in 1872; Rev. Isaac Thompson, preacher in charge, and Rev. M. R. 
Jones, Presiding Elder; was recommended to the Annual Conference by the Quarterly 
Conference of New Harmony Circuit, in 1878, and was received into the Annual Confer- 
ence that same year; Rev. S. W. Cope, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Doggett, presiding. 
He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Keener in 1880; ordained Elder by Bishop Gran- 
bery in 1882, at Plattsburg, Missouri. He has served the following appointments: 
Mexico Circuit, 1878-1880; Madison Circuit, 1881-1883; Sturgeon Circuit, 1884-1885; 
Beadsville Circuit, 1886-1890; Humphrey Circuit, 1890-1892; Linneus Circuit, 1892; 
Osborn Circuit, 1893; Maysville Circuit, 1894-1895; Edinburgh Circuit, 1896-1899; Pat- 
tonsburg, 1900; McFall, 1901. About four hundred persons have been received into the 
Church under his ministry. Under his pastorate a church near Mexico, Missouri, was 
built. He received his education in the public schools. He was married to Miss Pauline 
E. Beshears, in September, 1858, and they have six children, William R. Shackelford, 
John E. Shackleford, Leonidas E. Shackleford, Mary Z. Shackleford, Abbie L. Shackle- 
ford and Cora E. Shackleford. Brother Shackleford is one of our good men, and he has 
done faithful service. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— GALLATIN DISTRICT. 



251 



REV BRADFORD HEWLET TRIPP. 



As in the East the shepherd always precedes the flock, so does 
Jesus ever keep in front of the soul that trusts and loves Him. — 
Dr. F. B. Meyer. 



Rev. Bradford Hewlet Tripp 
was born January 10th, 1842, at 
Lyons, Clinton County, Iowa. 
He is a son of Stephen Tripp 
and Eva Eliza Tripp, who were 
members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, for a num- 
ber of years. He was converted 
in May, 1868, at Millville, Grant 
County, Wisconsin, under the 
ministry of Rev. Kellogg, and 
joined the Church at the time of 
his conversion. He was con- 
verted at a class meeting held 
after the morning service con- 
ducted by the pastor, and was 
almost at once called to the min- 
istry. For thirty-nine years his 
soul, watered by divine favoi 
and cultivated by infinite love, 
has grown and developed a 
deeper knowledge of God and a 
sweeter and stronger love. He 
was licensed to preach by the 
Quarterly Conference of the Bell 
and Flint Factory Circuit of the 
North Alabama Conference on 
March 11th, 1871; Rev. M. E. 
Johnston, preacher in charge, 
and Rev. A. F. Driskill, Presid- 
ing Elder. He was recommend- 
ed for admission on trial into 
the Missouri Conference by the 
Quarterly Conference of the 
Jamesport Circuit, on Septem- 
ber 11th, 1875, and was received 
into the Annual Conference, Oc- 
tober 10th, 1875, at Glasgow, ^ __ ., 
Missouri; Rev. S. W- Atteberry, Presiding Elder, and Bishop John C. Keener, presia- 
ing. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop John C. Keener, October 10th, 1875, at 
Glasgow, Missouri. He has filled the following appointments: Gallatin ^ irc ^iy, two 
years; Scottsville Circuit, two years; Gallatin Circuit, one year; Princeton Mission, 
one year; Gallatin Circuit, one year; Tinney's Point, one year. At the Conference 
held at Chillicothe in September, 1883, he asked for and was granted a location. 
Under his ministry there have been many conversions and many additions to tne 
Church. Under his pastorates two churches have been built, a parsonage on tne 
Gallatin Circuit, and one on the Scottsville Circuit. He was married to Miss ^mma 
Engle, June 8th, 1866, and the names of their children are Seth J. Tripp, Martna a. 
Tripp, Charles A. Tripp, Lewis D. Tripp, Daisy D. Tripp, William F. Tripp, Grace L. 
Tripp and Merville L. Tripp. He says that the most important crisis in his lite was 
the conflict with Satan about his call to the ministry, and the current of his lite 
turned when he won the victory. 




252 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV GRAFTON TANQUARY. 



'Tis our Jehovah fills the heavens; as long as He shall reign 
Almighty, we are strong. — Young. 



Rev. Grafton Tanquary was born near Winchester, Virginia, August 1.8th, 1824. 
His father was not a member of any church, but his mother was a Quaker. He moved 
with his parents to Ohio in 1836, and after attending one of the best private schools 
of the times for a number of years, he engaged in milling with his father and then 
for himself, shipping flour to Cincinnati. In 1848 he was married to Miss Rebecca 
Jacoby; of this union seven children were born; four are living, two sons and two 
daughters. All belong to the Church and are loyal and faithful. The girls are in 
Tucumcora, New Mexico. One son lives at Osborn, Missouri, and has been for several 
years a faithful steward and Sunday School Superintendent. One, Rev. J. W. Tan- 
quary, is a preacher in the Missouri Conference. Grafton E. Tanquary, the youngest 
son, died in 1902, and was for a number of years a member of the Missouri Conference. 
Brother Tanquary was converted and joined the Church in 1840, and felt that he 
ought to preach the Gospel, but he quenched the Spirit and for years lived in a 
backslidden state, but attending a camp meeting in Clark County, Missouri, in 1865, 
conducted by Rev. C. I. VanDeventer, renewed his covenant with God and was licensed 
to preach. He was admitted on trial into the Missouri Annual Conference at Hanni- 
bal, Missouri, in 1865. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Marvin, at Macon City, 
in 1867, and was ordained Elder by Bishop McTyeire at Hannibal, in 1876. He 
traveled the following circuits: Colony, Newark, Florida, Liberty, Osborn, Millville, 
Polo, Platte City, Linneus, Edgerton, Kingston and Patttonsburg. He was a good 
preacher and his ministry bore fruit. Many souls were converted under his plain, 
pointed and forceful preaching. Many mature men and women came to God under his 
ministry. As an itinerant preacher, he was a success and went cheerfully and will- 
ingly to the work assigned. He was a fine mixer and visited from house to house. 
The people, the children as well as the old folks, were frlad to see "Uncle Tan," as they 
called him, come, and sorry when he left. He never forgot a name or face; he could 
meet a number of children, learn their names and readily call them by name the next 
time he saw them. He saw the bright side of everything, and always had a kind word 
for each brother at Conference. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— GALLATIN DISTRICT 



253 



REV JOHN WILLIAM TANQUARY, A.B. 

Converted human nature, in the whole circle of its wonderful 
Endowment and possibilities, is the noblest work of God. — Bishop 
Tigert. 



By Mrs. R. K. Brown. 

Rev. John Wm. Tanquary was 
born in Old Town, Ohio, March 
25th, 1854. His father and 
mother, Rev. Grafton and Re- 
becca Tanquary, were Metho- 
dists. His father was for a 
number of years a traveling 
preacher in the Missouri Con- 
ference. His parents came to 
Missouri when John was a child, 
settling in Clark County. When 
about eleven years of age he 
was crippled by having his foot 
caught in a threshing machine. 
At fifteen he was sent to Shel- 
byville High School, where he 
graduated, taking the A.B. de- 
gree in 1874. 

He was simply and truly con- 
verted, with a number of others, 
at a meeting held in the old 
chapel of Shelbyville High 
School. Mr. Terrell, his faith- 
ful Sunday School teacher, and 
Mrs. Alex Irwin, an earnest 
Church worker, were both in- 
strumental in leading him to 
Christ. 

After graduating he engaged 
in teaching in Millville, Ray 
County, Missouri. In 1879 and 
1880, he attended Central Col- 
lege. In the summer of 1880, 
he took a trip across the plains 
with an invalid brother, travel- 
ing three thousand miles in a 
covered wagon. Coming back 
to Ray County, he again en- 
gaged in teaching; was County School Commissioner two terms; principal of the Law- 
son Schools four years, and the Hardin School one year. About this time his father 
died and he went to Pattonsburg to be a help and comfort to his mother and sisters. 
He was principal of the Pattonsburg School one year; was appointed postmaster in 
1893, which office he held four years. Here he became more earnest in Church 
work, the pastors of the Church using him in every way. He was placed on a 
Campaign Committee by the District Conference for Northwest Missouri College, and 
made educational addresses over the District. He also became interested in League 
work and became more consecrated by seeking more earnestly and more prayerfully to 
know the will of God. He was licensed to preach and recommended for admission into 
the Annual Conference at the Gallatin District Conference, held in Lineville, Iowa, in 
1897. Rev. J. A. Glenville was his pastor and Rev. Z. M. Williams, D.D., the Presiding 
Elder. He was received on trial at the Annual Conference at Albany, Mo., Bishop 
Fitzgerald presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Granbery at Fayette, Mo., 
in 1899; Elder in 1901, at St. Joseph, Missouri, by Bishop Candler, assisted by Bishop 
Hendrix, who preached the sermon at Hundley Church. 

He has served the following churches: Union Star, Lock Springs and Jamesport 
Circuits, Cowgill, Jamesport and Maysville Stations, and is now serving the Lineville 
Station. 

He was married to Miss Elizabeth E. Brown, March 12th, 1901. He has always 
been of an unusually cheerful and bright disposition, which trait has made him quite 
popular with the young people and children in whom he takes so much interest and 
strives to aid in their advancement along both intellectual and spiritual lines. 




254 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV- JAMES MONROE TINNELL. 



Faith and divine grace, uniting in the believer, are equal to any 
Emergency that may arise in his life. — Dean Tillett. 



Rev. James Monroe Tinnell was born March 6th, 1875, at Turnersville, Robertson 
County, Tennessee. He is a son of James T. Tinnell and Mary B. Tinnell, both mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted at Ralston Station, 
Tennessee, in the year 1889, under the ministry of Rev. G. W Wilson, and joined 
the church at Sharon, Tennessee, in 1901, Rev. B. L. Harris being the preacher in 
charge. Being very young, it was not a hard struggle for him to come to the point 
where he saw his lost condition. He simply gave himself to Christ and He honored 
the gift by changing his whole nature and freeing him from sin. His growth in grace 
has been very marked; after his conversion he studied the Bible, attended all the 
services of the Church, Sunday School and Epworth League, which created within him 
a desire for greater things, so he applied himself to the conditions of God, who led him 
into a deeper understanding of His works and ways. He was licensed to preach by the 
Union City District Conference, July 28th, 1904; Rev. B. L. Harris, pastor, and Rev. 
G. B. Baskerville, Presiding Elder. He was recommended to the Annual Conference 
for admission on trial by the Gallatin District Conference, April 3rd, 1905, at Jameson, 
Missouri; was received into the Annual Conference on trial during the Conference year 
of 1905-1906; Rev. W. A. Hanna, Presiding Elder, and Bishop E. R. Hendrix, presiding. 
He served the Lineville Circuit, 1904-1905, as a supply; Pattonsburg Circuit, 1905-1906; 
his present work is Weatheby Circuit, where he has been since 1906. Thirty-one per- 
sons have been received into the Church under his ministry. He attended the Sharon 
Training School three years. He was married to Miss Grace Adair, September 27th, 
1905, and they have one boy, Howard Lee Tinnell. He considers the call to preach 
as the most important crisis in his life. Some of the books which have helped him are 
Wesley's Sermons and Notes, Watson's Institutes, Plutarch's Lives, Natural Law, and 
many others. His father and mother died while he was in his second year, so he was 
reared without parents. The God of the fatherless has been his helper. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— GALLATIN DISTRICT. 



255 




REV- SAMUEL DAVID GOSE. 



His is love beyond a brother's, 

Costly, free, and knows no end. — John Newton. 

Rev. Samuel David Gose was born near Edinburg, Grundy County, Missouri, 
August 22nd, 1870. He is a son of William D. Gose and Martha J. Gose. tfotn 
parents belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted at uw 
Hatton Chapel, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in Grundy County, Mxssoigi, 
under the ministry of Rev. David McAllen, during the winter of 1892 and jomea 
that Church during the meeting. He had been reared in the Church and around the 
family altar, had not drifted far in sin, hence his conversion was not oi tne Kmu 
that showed marked change. Just a definite stand for Christ, and a calm peaceana 
assurance, was all. His growth in grace has been steady and continuous, ^eis> 
stronger in love, in faith and a willingness to do God's will than ever before. He was 
licensed to preach by the Gallatin District Conference, in May, 1900, at U nior war, 
Missouri; Rev. G. W Trotter, preacher in charge, and Rev. D. t. Bone, fresia mg 
Elder; was recommended to the Annual Conference for admission on trial that same 
year and by the same District Conference; was admitted on trial into the j vl ^s°uii 
Annual Conference in September, 1900; Rev. D. F. Bone, Presiding Elder, and Bishop 
J. C. Granbery, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Wilson, September on, 
1902, at Chillicothe, Missouri, He has served the following appointments: WeatnerDy 
Circuit, 1900-1901; New Hampton Circuit, 1901-1902; Pattonsburg Circuit, If /-™"*' 
Lock Springs Circuit, 1903-1905 ; Denver Circuit, 1905-1907. He has received about 
one hundred persons into the Church. He attended the common country schools Ham- 
burg Academy, and State Normal at Kirksville, Missouri. He was married to Mis 
Florence M. Hooper, July 24th, 1902, and they have one little daughter, Mattie Jewell 
Gose. Some of the books which have helped him most are Doggett s Sermons , Munsey s 
Sermons, Wesley's Sermons, Moody's Sermons, and Drummond s Natural Law in xne 
Spiritual World. Brother Gose thinks the Christian College is the right arm jn l pre 
paring for the future development of the Church, and the one thing m the state wmcn 
keeps the citizenship from drifting into materialism and infidelity, the stepping stones* 
to immorality. 



256 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- CHARLES BERNARD CAMPBELL. 



There is no happiness for Man but in the Lovf of God. — Dr. 

John E. Godbey. 



Rev. Charles Bernard Camp- 
bell was born January 14th, 
1866, in Buchanan County, Mis- 
souri. His father, John H. 
Cambpell, was a Cumberland 
Presbyterian, and his mother, 
Jane Campbell, was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He was convert- 
ed January 10th, 1887, at Tur- 
ney, Clinton County, Missouri, 
in a meeting held by the pastor, 
Rev. J. Y. Blakey. He had had 
deep and clear convictions from 
a very early age, and these had 
restrained him all along the 
way. His conversion was grad- 
ual and seemingly made com- 
plete by prayer, repentance, ex- 
ercise of faith, public profession 
and religious activity. He has 
no doubt as to advancement in 
principal and essential things. 
What seemed rather visionary at 
an earlier date has, by reason 
and experience, become well 
fixed and sure. He has found 
the habit of his life to be sym- 
pathy for all men and a per- 
petual spirit of praise for the 
manifold mercies and wondrous 
love of God. He was licensed to 
preach by the Osborn Circuit 
of the Plattsburg District Con 
ference, September 3rd, 1892; 
Rev. W. G. Shackelford, pastor, 
and Rev. J. M. O'Bryen, Presid- 
ing Elder. The Quarterly Con- 
ference of Osborn Circuit recommended him for admission on trial into the Annual 
Conference in August, 1893, and he was received on trial into the Annual Conference 
at Monroe City in September, 1893; Rev. R. H. Cooper, Presiding Elder, and Bishop 
Haygood, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop O. P. Fitzgerald, at Albany, 
Missouri, September 5th, 1897; ordained Elder by Bishop John C. Granbery at Fayette, 
Missouri, September 3rd, 1899. Brother Campbell has served the following charges: 
Maryville Circuit, one year; Guilford Circuit, two years; Springhill, two years; Skid- 
more Circuit, three years; Spruce Street, St. Joseph, one year; B^eckenridge and 
Mooresville, one year; was reappointed to Breckenridge and transferred by Bishop Key 
soon after Conference to the Oklahoma Conference and put in charge of Earlboro and 
Wewoka. About two hundred and seventy-six persons have been taken into the 
Church under his ministry. Under his nastor^tes a parsonage was built on the Mary- 
ville Circuit, one at Guilford, also the Bethel Church on the Guilford Circuit, and now 
building a church at Wewoka. His education was obtained at the oublic schools, with 
one year in Northwest Missouri College, at Albany, Missouri. He was married to 
Miss Sarelda Ann Potter, October 10th, 1888, and one little girl was born to them, 
who is now deceased. He thinks possibly the most important crisis in his life was 
trying to decide whether he would do the work he knew God had called him to do. 
This conviction was certain and unmistakable from the time he was fourteen years 
of age, and he had no peace of heart or mind until he surrendered and entered upon 
his life-wo^k in the ministry. Some of the books that have been helpful to him are 
"Pilgrim's Progress" and the "Bible Looking Glass." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— GALLATIN DISTRICT. 



25T 



REV. MANSFIELD FENTON CROWE. 



At his conversion, the whole face of nature seemed to rise fresh 
And smiling, as from a baptism of Infinite Love. — Dr. D. R. 
McAnally. 



Rev. Mansfield Fenton Crowe 

was born April 2nd, 1861, near 

Centerville, Reynolds County, 

Missouri. He was reared in 

Oregon County, Missouri, his 

father having moved his family 

South just the year before his 

death in the Confederate army. 

He is a son of John Fenton 

Crowe and Mary Ann Crowe, 

both of whom died when he was 

about two years of age. He was 

converted in November, 1888, at 

Columbia, Missouri, under the 

ministry of Rev. John M. Crowe. 

He joined the Church during the 

same meeting in which he was 

converted. He had gone to the 

altar several times without be- 
ing satisfied. At a six o'clock 

prayer meeting the next morn- 
ing, after all his friends had 

prayed earnestly for him, the 

meeting closed, and he was not 

saved. As they started to leave 

the room, he felt himself lost as 

never before, and calling might- 
ily upon the Lord, he received 

forgiveness and wondrous light 

in his* soul, sometime between 

starting and passing out of the 

door. His growth in grace was 

retarded for some time by his 

not being willing to take an ac- 
tive part in the services of the 

Church. With compliance with 

duty came a corresponding- 
growth in grace, but it was not . ., f 
until after his third year in the ministry that he discovered the greater privileges 01 
believers to have a closer walk with God. This knowledge came to him by reading 
the books of the ministerial course and by hearing Dr. Beverly Carradme, the great 
apostle of entire satisfaction. Through his instrumentality, God for Christ s sane 
gave him a great spiritual blessing. It came by consecration and faith on his part. 
He was licensed to preach by the District Conference at Kingston, Missouri, * ebruary 
7th, 1894; Rev. R. L. Thompson, Presiding Elder. The Quarterly Conference of 
Francis Street Church, St. Joseph, Missouri, recommended him to the Annual con- 
ference for admission on trial, August 20th, 1894; Rev. J. M. O'Bryen, Presiding 
Elder, and Rev. John A. Beagle, preacher in charge; was received into the Annual 
Conference that same year at Carrollton, Missouri; Rev. J. M. O'Bryen, Presiding 
Elder, and Bishop E. R. Hendrix, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bisnop 
Charles B. Galloway, September 6th, 1896, at Hannibal, Missouri; was ordained 
Elder by Bishop John C. Granbery, September 16th, 1890, at Fulton, Missouri. He has 
served the following charges: Wilcox Circuit, one year; Craig and forest city 
Circuit, one year; Gooding Church, South St. Joseph, two years; Warrenton Circuit, 
three years; Vandalia, two years; Edinburg Circuit, one year; he is now serving ms 
third year at Jameson, Missouri. He has received about six hundred persons into trie 
Church. Several churches and parsonages have been built and bought under nis 
pastorate. He attended public schools in South Missouri, the University of Missouri 
at Columbia, Missouri, and Central College, Fayette. He was married to Miss Uine 
Elmore, July 3rd, 1883. Four children were born to them, all of whom are dead. 




258 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE. 




CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT EPWORTH LEAGUE CONFERENCE AT 

NORBORNE. 



1 806-CENTENNI AL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 



CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



Presiding Elder ... ,C. Crimes 

Chillicothe Sta. T. W- Alton 

Chillicothe Ct.. ... .E. M. Capp 

Supernumerary, W T. Merrill 



Linneus Ct. 
Browning Ct.. 
Greencastle Ct. 
Milan Sta.. 
Milan Ct.. 
Humphreys Ct. 



W. E. Tinney 

.L. R. Sparks 

..Sup. by R. J. McDaniel 

. H. L. Davenport 

. Sup. by D. H. Myers 

.N. F. Johnson 



Triplett Ct.. 
Brunswick Sta. 
De Witt Ct.. 
Carrollton Sta. 
Norborne Sta. . 
Norborne Ct.. 
Mt. Olive Ct.. 
McBee Ct. 
Bogard Ct. 
Hale Ct. 



.J. W. Ramsey 

W. J. Parvin 

.J. A. Mitchell 

W. T. Whiteside 

.J. N. Boyd 

T. B. Price 

.H. Neighbours 

.J. D. Sprague 

W 0. G. Potter 

.C. G. Hill 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



259 



REV CHANEY GRIMES. 



All effectual preaching is done with the Holy Ghost sent down 
From Heaven, and herein is the philosophy of preaching. 

— Bishop Marvin. 

By Rev. Charles 0. Ransford. 
Rev. Chaney Grimes was born 
in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, 
May 25, 1843. His parents, 
Charles and Sarah Chaney 
Grimes, were Methodists of the 
most pronounced type. Family 
worship was their invariable 
custom — the father and mother 
alternated in conducting the 
services. Reared in such an at- 
mosphere the godly example and 
admonitions and prayers of his 
parents strongly impressed him 
and he was converted at home 
when about nine years old, while 
singing a song beginning with 
the following lines: 
"The pearl that worldlings 

covet 
Is not the pearl for me." 

His parents and pastor and 
Christians generally seemed to 
think him too young for relig- 
ious impressions, and no par- 
ticular religious instructions 
were given him. His mother 
died when he was about nine 
years old and he was left to the 
care of his sisters and relatves. 
At a Methodist revival in In- 
diana, when he was about fif- 
teen, he was again permitted 
to know the pardoning mercy of 
God and united with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. At 
this time he was deeply im- 
pressed that it was his duty to 
preach, but did not then yield 
to the conviction. He came west 

in 1865 and in 1867 he was married to Miss Nannie Griffith. In the winter of 1868 
and 1869 he and his wife united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at Grif- 
fith's Grove, Maryville Circuit, Missouri Conference. He was licensed to preach the 
following summer by the Quarterly Conference of this charge, Rev. D. C. O'Howell, 
Presiding Elder, and Rev. H. A. Davis pastor in charge. In the fall of 1870 he 
traveled this same work as a supply, Rev. W E. Dockery, Presiding Elder. He was 
admitted on trial in the Missouri Conference at Palmyra, September, 1871. He was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop Wightman at Carrollton, September, 1873, and Elder at 
Glasgow, September, 1875, by Bishop Keener. His appointments have been as fol- 
lows: Osborne Circuit, two years, 1871-1872; Linneus Circuit, four years, 1873-1876; 
Carrollton Station, two years, 1877-1878; Richmond Station, four years, 1879-1882; 
Moberly Station, one year, 1883; Columbia Station, one year, 1884; Chillicothe Sta- 
tion, two years, 1885-1886; Maryville Station, one year, 1887; Tenth Street, St 
Joseph, two years, 1888-1889; Gallatin Station, one year, 1890; Dearborn Circuit, one 
year, 1891; Macon District, three years, 1892-1894; Hannibal District, four years, 
1895-1898; Plattsburg District, four years, 1899-1902; Chillicothe District, four years, 
1903-1907. 

His first wife died at Richmond, June 7, 1882, and he was married to Miss Flora 
V. Crellin in Chillicothe, Missouri, November 9, 1887. His ministry has been unvary- 
ingly successful and fruitful in great good and as a Presiding Elder, which office he 
has filled continuously for fifteen years, he has rendered the church most excellent 
service. His administration has been wise and progressive, and a conspicuous suc- 
cess, particularly with the young people. 

His sons, Rev. Charles Chaney Grimes and Edwin Grimes, are bright young men 
of promise; the former is an exceptionally brilliant young preacher in the Missouri 
Conference. 




260 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




THE NEW CHILLICOTHE CHURCH. 



By Rev. Edgar C. McVoy. 

The new church at Chillicothe, which was dedicated by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, 
during August, 1903, represents much in the way of zeal and consecration on the 
part of that noble membership. 

It is a commodious and sightly building, constructed of buff brick, trimmed with 
stone, and has the appointments of the modern church — Sunday School Class Rooms, 
Ladies' Parlors, Pastor's Study, a large and well arranged Basement, etc. 

The art glass which is used throughout the building is of fine quality and the 
memorial windows (there are several) are unusually handsome. The total cost was 
about $18,000.00, exclusive of pipe organ and decorating. 

In this brief sketch it will not be possible to mention the names of the many 
whose contributions and efforts made this building possible. Never was a church 
blessed with a nobler band of women; they gave unsparingly of their energies and 
means to bring this enterprise to a successful issue and too much praise cannot be 
given them. Without their aid the church could not have been built— their names 
are surely written in Heaven. 

But mention must be made of three noble laymen, whose names are inseparably 
connected with this church— they are: Brothers J. A. Grace, W. H. Mansur and L. 
^urrm It is no disparagement to the others to say that these three men labored 
more faithfully than them all in this enterprise. Of the three, Captain Mansur alone 
remains to enjoy this earthly temple— the other two are reaping the reward of long 
and devoted service. The pastor in charge at that time shall always hold in special 
love and honor these brethren, as well as many others who rendered such unselfish 
service m the task of building this new church. 

Rev. ML. Gray Presiding Elder of the Chillicothe District at that time, also 
gave invaluable counsel and assistance in the carrying to completion of this enterprise. 

May this church always be a great spiritual power in that community, may 
thousands yet be saved at her altars, and may the pastor who worked with these 
consecrated men and women in building this good house to the Lord, meet them every 
one, at last, in that city, where temples are not built with hands, and where we may 
worship m unbroken fellowship. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



261 



MR. JAMES ABERNATHY GRACE. 



Every man has a glorious Destiny within his grasp. 

— Bishop Marvin. 



By Mrs. Ida Grace Stewart. 

James Abernathy Grace was 
born in Springfield, Hamp- 
shire County, West Virginia, 
April 19th, 1835. He was 
reared in the Presbyterian 
Church, under the strict disci- 
pline taught and practiced by 
that worthy people in earlier 
days. When about twenty years 
old he was converted during a 
Methodist revival meeting at 
Philippi, West Virginia, and 
joined the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, of which he 
was a loyal member the re- 
mainder of his life, over fifty 
years. In 1858 he came west 
and went into the general mer- 
cantile business at Scottsville, 
Sullivan County, Missouri, on 
borrowed capital, with no se- 
curity other than his industry, 
energy and Christian character. 
How well these characteristics 
served him is attested by the 
degree of success he attained. 
In 1860 he moved his business 
to Msadville, Missouri, on the 
Hannibal & St. Joe Railroad, 
then just built. On October 
4th, 1862, he was married to 
Miss Tilitha Gordon of Living- 
ston County, Missouri. To 
them were born eleven children, 
one of whom died in infancy; 
the remaining ten are living at 
the present time. In 1865 and 
1866 he was in business in 
Bedford, Missouri, and in 1867 he moved to Chillicothe, Missouri, where he con- 
tinued to reside until his death, June 25th, 1906. During these years he was variously 
engaged in the dry goods, hardware, wholesale, tobacco, farming implement and lum- 
ber business. In 1889 he received a severe blow in the death of his wife, which 
left him alone to rear a large family of small children, but God gave him strength 
and wisdom to perform his work and spared him to see them all grown. Ihe church 
was dear to his heart and he was always found in his place m the sanctuary when 
not hindered by illness. It was among his chief joys to contribute of his means 
to the support and advancement of Christ's kingdom on earth, and he chose the most 
quiet and unostentatious manner of making his gifts. He often expressed a soul- 
hunger for the old-time class-meeting and loved to testify to the saving power ol the 
Holy Spirit. Being a man of many cares, frail of body, and delicate in health, he 
often referred to himself as a living monument of God's grace and mercy. In the 
language of a beloved friend, "his experience lifted him above the ordinary and gave 
him a place among the sons of God." There was never a doubt in his mind as to the 
reality of the religion of Jesus Christ and his life was a living testimony to its 
genuineness. His last act in this life was to attend the Sunday evening worship 
where he entered into the service with characteristic fervor. About ten o clock he 
retired to rest and passed away during sleep, seemingly without a struggle. A beauti- 
ful close to a beautiful life — to go to sleep on earth and awake in Heaven. 




262 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV SAMUEL WRIGHT COPE. 



The wireless message from Heaven must be received from Heaven 
And transmitted by some attuned instrument. — Bishop Hendrix. 



By Rev. Bowman D. Sipple. 

Rev. Samuel Wright Cope 
was born in Blount County, 
Tennessee, February 14, 1826, 
dedicated to the Lord in baptism 
in infancy, removed to Missouri 
with his parents when about 
five years of age and settled in 
Montgomery County, professed 
religion publicly, and united 
with the Methodist Church 
when thirteen, at the old camp- 
ground near Danville, but fre- 
quently declared publicly that 
there had never been a day that 
he could remember when the 
love of God was not shed 
abroad in his heart. Mr. Cope 
taught school two years and 
then attended school at Ozark 
Institute, near Fayetteville, 
Arkansas; was licensed to ex- 
hoit in 1848; licensed to preach 
February 3, 1849, by the War- 
renton Circuit, at old Ebenezer 
Church, entered the traveling 
connection in the Missouri Con- 
ference, 1849, and was sent to 
the Louisiana Circuit. During 
this year he was married to 
Miss Louisa Stewart who lived 
four years and six months rafter 
the marriage. For thirty-eight 
years he traveled different 
charges and districts, always 
hopeful, joyful, full of pleas- 
antry of the purest kind and 
made the world infinitely better 
to thousands of peopie. He traveled Mexico and St. Charles Circuits, Canton and 
Fulton, Hannibal and St. Joseph Stations. April 1, 1856, he was married to Miss 
Martha Jane Scott, daughter of Colonel John Scott, a prominent lawyer of that city. 
He was then appointed to Columbia and Fayette Circuits. In the latter field in the 
year 1858-59 were converted and added to the church E. R. Hendrix, C. C. Woods and 
S. W. Atterbery. Other charges were Savannah, Weston, Platte City, High Hill, Chilli- 
cothe Station and Spring Hill; then Plattsburg, Chillicothe and Mexico Districts, and 
Jamesport, Jameson and Bedford Circuits. Upon the failure of sight of the old 
veteran he accepted the superannuated relation in 1887 and continued until his death, 
May 7, 1899. 

Mr. Cope was an enthusiastic on the doctrines of infant baptism and infant 
church membership and kindred doctrines. He believed that a a child could live a 
correct life so that the approval of the Lord might dwell upon it from infancy. The 
Quarterly meeting was a great day in his best days. Some great theme consumed 
him and entertained the great congregation. He believed in preaching doctrines and 
preached them, not for controversy, but for instruction. When unable to travel regu- 
larly he spent his time writing, or dictating to another to write, his maturest thoughts. 
He became the author of the following books: "The Great Evil and Its Remedy," 
"The Christian Ministry," "In Lieu of Preaching," "Marriage, Home and Heaven," 
"New Songs of Praise" (quite a number of these songs he composed), and "The 
Story of a Happy Life," his own life story, told in a helpful manner. 

Whenever strength permitted he was ready to preach to the last. His life was 
pure, zealous and very faithful. He excelled as a pastor, visiting from house to house, 
sympathizing with all men in joy and sorrow. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



263 



REV- WILLIS E. DOCKERY. 



The period of the Redemption will abide forever in the Records 
Of the Ages as God's brightest manifestation of Himself. 

— Bishop Marvin. 



The now lamented Willis E. 
Dockery was the son of Alex- 
ander Dockery and Nancy 
Dockery, who were members of 
the Baptist Church. His was a 
sudden and grand conversion, 
at twenty years of age; this 
occurred at the home of Isom 
Ware, near Spring Hill, Mis- 
souri, under the preaching of 
Rev. Edwin Robinson. He 
joined the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, at Gee's Creek 
Church in 1846. He grew in 
grace, conducted prayer-meet- 
ings, and did what he could in 
a private way until he was 
licensed to preach by the Crav- 
ensville Quarterly Conference ; 
Rev. Horace Brown, Presiding 
Elder. He was recommended by 
this same Quarterly Conference 
for admission into the Annual 
Conference in 1848. Bishop 
Andrew presided over the Con- 
ference in 1848, at which he 
was received on trial; Rev. 
Horace Brown was the Presid- 
ing Elder. He was ordained 
Deacon by Bishop Robert Paine 
at the Conference held in St. 
Joseph, Missouri, in 1852; was 
ordained Elder by Bishop James 
0. Andrew at the Palmyra Con- 
ference in 18-53. At the Con- 
ference of 1851 he vas leceived 
into full connection, Rev. 

Andrew Monroe presiding. He served the following charges: Linneus Circuit, J 848; 
Trenton Circuit, 1849; Milan Circuit, 1850-1851; Gallatin Circuit, 1852; Richmond, 
1853-1854; New Market Circuit, 1855-1856; Hydesburg, 1857-1858; Macon City, 1 859- 
1860; Keytesville, 1861-1862; Linneus, 1863-1864; Chillicothe District, 1865-1868; 
St. Joseph District, 1869-1870; St. Charles District, 1871-1872; Piattsburg District, 
1873-1875; Chillicothe Station, 1876; Tenth Street, St. Joseph, 1877-1879; Spring 
Hill, 1880; Paris Circuit, 1881-1882; Liberty, 1883; Cameron Station, 1884-1885; 
Brookfield, 1886; Tripplett Circuit, 1887; Gallatin District, 1888 1889. At the Con- 
ference held in Chillicothe in 1883 he was located at its own request and was re- 
admitted the next year. He traveled Liberty Circuit as a local preacher in the in- 
terval. Rev. Samuel C. Littlepage, now of Texas, and Miss Hulda Glaze, afterward 
the wife of Rev. H. A. Davis, were among the three thousand persons converted under 
his ministry. Brookfield class, Hughes' Church, St. John, Van Ausdale, Wintersville, 
Crumpacker Church, Hurst Church, Locust Creek Church, and others were organ- 
ised, and fifteen churches and two parsonages were built during his active pastor- 
ates. He attended private schools about four years. He was married to Miss Sarah 
Ellen McHaney, January 13th, 1842. Ex-Governor Alexander Monroe Dockery, their 
only child, was converted when a boy. Baldwin's "Armageddon," and "The Problem 
of Human Life," by Wilford Hall are among the many books which were of help 
to him. Brother Dockery's declining days were spent principally at the home of his 
adopted daughter, where he passed peacefully to his reward above. 




264 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, CARROLLTON, MISSOURI. 



By Will S. Holliday. 

The first Methodist Society organized in Carrollton, Missouri, was in 1842. At 
that time Carrollton was on the frontier and services were held in log houses occupied 
by the Methodist people. A few years later the Christian people united and a church 
house was erected, the building being used by the various denominations. After a 
few years the Methodists assisted the Presbyterians in erecting a small building, and 
they used this jointly for some years. 

In 1868 the Southern Methodists erected a substantial brick house of worship 
and this was used by the congregation until our handsome new church was built 
in 1899. 

In 1898 Rev. W B. Wheeler was sent to Carrollton, and he began to agitate 
the question of a new church. Within a year he had the project well under way. 
'Captain William M. Eads, J. N. Tuley, S. W- Grace, Captain John Harrison and wife 
of St. Louis, Mrs. Sarah Earickson, Warren Minnis, and others responded to the call 
liberally, the old building was sold to the brethren of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and our new church was a certainty. 

J. N. Tuley, William M. Eads, Dr. M. W. Craton, and Dr. George R. Highsmith 
were appointed on a building committee to act with the pastor and active work was 
commenced. The building was completed the latter part of November and, on De- 
cember 10, 1899, was dedicated by Dr. W. B. Palmore, editor of the St. Louis 
Christian Advocate. The total cost of the building, equipped with handsome furni- 
ture, pipe organ, pulpit, and other necessities, represented a cash outlay of $12,500. 
When the church was dedicated this was all paid except $1,100, which amount was 
paid in full the following year, Rev. H. C. Garrett finally securing the money. 

Every window in the church is a beautiful memorial window, placed there by 
the relatives of the old saints who for years had been pillars of Methodism in 
Corrollton and Missouri. On account of these beautiful memorial windows the church 
was named the "Memorial Methodist Church." 

During the year 1906 the congregation at Carrollton erected a splendid par- 
sonage on the church lot, paid for it when completed, and now the Carrollton con- 
gregation has one of the most beautiful^ church properties in the Missouri Confer- 
ence. This parsonage was built under the pastorate of Rev. Warren T. Whiteside. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



265 




CARROLLTON PARSONAGE. 

This is one of our newest parsonages and one of the best. This enterprise was 
begun and completed under the pastorate of Rev. Warren T. Whiteside. This house 
is an honor to Brother Whiteside and to our congregation at Carrollton. 



2«6 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. MARTIN LUTHER EADS. 



For so an entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly 
Into the Everlasting Kingdom of our Lord and Saviour. 

—St. Peter. 
Rev. Martin Luther Eads was 
born in Louisa County, Vir- 
ginia, April 6th, 1782. He mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth Collins of 
Spottsylvania, Virginia, in 1811, 
and of this union there were 
ten children. Brother Eads' 
mother was a pious member of 
the church, by whom his mind 
was early impressed with the 
importance of a religious life, 
who stored his mind with the 
knowledge of our holy religion. 
He was happily converted to 
God in 1814, through the instru- 
nentality of the Methodist 
Ohurch and lived a devoted ad- 
vocate of its doctrines and 
isages. He was licensed to 
weach in 1815, in Virginia, and 
n 1816 moved to Harrison 
County, Kentucky. Just the 
time he entered the itinerant 
connection is not known. His 
first Circuit was Lexington, 
Kentucky. After this he _ trav- 
eled a number of Circuits in 
Kentucky. In 1839 he moved to 
Knox County, Missouri; and in 
1840 he was appointed to the 
Monticello Circuit, Missouri 
Conference; 1841, Shelbyville 
Circuit, two years; at the close 
of this year he located, but en- 
tered the traveling connection 
again in 1850; Huntsvilie Cir- 
cuit, two years; 1852, Keytes- 
ville Circuit, two years; 1854, 
Paris Circuit; 1855, Platte City Circuit; 1856, granted a supernumerary relation and 
appointed to the Hydesburg Circuit, with Rev. Louis Baldwin; 1857, Huntsvilie Cir- 
cuit, with Rev. James Penn; 1858, owing to ill health he did not take an appoint- 
ment; 1859, Sturgeon, Missouri; 1860, Wellsville Circuit; 1861, Emerson Circuit; 
1862, the Missouri Conference held no session; 1863, he was granted a superannuated 
relation in which he continued until God called him home, January 7th, 1870, age 
seventy-seven years and nine months. Brother Eads' character passed at each session 
of the Conference showing the esteem in which he was held by his brethren in the 
ministry. He was a faithful, zealous preacher for more than fifty years. In all 
this time he never disappointed a congregation, was an industrious and energetic man 
in all his undertakings. He preached his last sermon in November before his death 
in January. It was marked with more than usual force and pathos. For several 
years he was a great sufferer, but he evinced much resignation to the will of God. 
During his last illness he frequently expressed himself as anxious to depart and be 
with Christ, and when asked if he was willing to die, he said: "Yea, more; I am 
anxious to go home." When a song was being sung his spirit seemed to rise above 
the pain of body and sorrows of earth into a deeper, sweeter communion with God. 
His last remark was: "Tell my brethren that God's mercy extends even to me, and 
the atonement is broad enough for me to rest upon forever." He died as tranquil as 
a summer evening's setting sun. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



267 



HON. WILLIAM MARTIN EADS. 



His knowledge, irradiated by the brightness of God shines 
With a new Celestial clearness. — Dr. Bushnell. 



William Martin Eads, son of 
Rev. Martin L. Eads, of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, was born in Harrison- 
ville, Kentucky, May 10th, 1832. 
At the age of six his father was 
transferred to the Missouri Con- 
ference and Missouri became his 
home. In 1849 he entered How- 
ard High School, Fayette, Mis- 
souri, which was afterward 
merged into Central College. 
Here he distinguished himself 
by arduous work. His resolute 
will and marked individuality 
even so early characterizing 
him. In this age of liberal edu- 
cation it is difficult to under- 
stand how one at that period 
could so scan the horizon and 
grasp the wonderful possibilities 
of a College education, and un- 
dertake it dependent upon one's 
own personal exertion. He 
worked nights, mornings and 
Saturdays, and met his living 
expenses. His tuition he paid 
after marriage. Near the close 
of his graduation in 1853, 
President Davis of Central Col- 
lege was removed to Lexington, 
Missouri, and Mr. Eads was 
chosen to fill his unexpired 
term. He commenced life by 
teaching in Brunswick, and 
later in Carrollton, which place 
was his home, with only slight 
intermission, until death. All 

spare moments during school terms were devoted to reading law. He commenced 
practice with Colonel J. B. Hale. Hale & Eads became the most successful firm in 
the fifth Judicial district, celebrated in criminal practice and land litigation. He was 
a staunch Democrat, took active part in county, state and national politics, and was 
a delegate to every state and national convention for many years. He won notoriety 
by placing many of his friends in nomination. He was well versed in the Scriptures 
and the Bible was one of his text books; he was as familiar with it as with Black- 
stone. For years he was teacher of a large Bible class in Sunday school. He joined 
the church in 1878, and was recognized throughout the Conference as one of the 
Church's staunch supporters. He was appointed delegate to the Ecumenical Confer- 
ence, which met in London in 1901. He was a strong advocate and believer in higher 
education, and served two years as curator of the State University, which is in- 
debted to his efforts for many improvements. During his late years an almost un- 
bounded love characterized his work for the church. It is pleasant to recall how, as 
the days went by, his restless, nervous disposition softened and quieted as he lived 
closer to his God. He was one of the promoters in the erection of the beautiful 
Memorial Church, watching from day to day, its construction and completion. He 
lived to worship in it two years when called home, August 29th, 1901. Taking a 
survey of his life, recalling his industry, his honesty, his unbounded attachment for 
home, friends and country; his home, no matter how far he roamed, its light still 
beamed in his heart; like Hamlet, one can say: "He was a man take him for all in 
all; I shall not look on his like again." 




233 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. ROBERT ARCHIBALD AUSTIN. 



The Faith that keeps the Unseen in view, that brings God 
Within the range of vision; the Faith which lifts the Soul 
Into the region of Celestial light, and into the Brotherhood of 
The Immortals. — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. Robert Archibald Austin, 
son of Peter Austin and Sarah 
Austin, was born in Bedford 
County, Virginia, September 2d, 
1835. He was converted at 
Carrollton, Missouri, during a 
protracted meeting held in the 
Baptist Church, that being the 
only church in town then. He 
joined the church under the 
ministry of Rev. William M. 
Leftwich, D. D. He was li- 
censed to preach by the Quar- 
terly Conference at DeWitt, 
Missouri, in 1855; recommended 
to the Missouri Annual Con- 
ference by this same Quarterly 
Conference ; ordained Deacon 
by Bishop Andrew at Glas- 
gow, Missouri, in 1857; or- 
dained Elder at St. Joseph, Mis- 
souri, in 1859, by Bishop Paine. 
His first appointment was to 
the Trenton Mission as junior 
preacher in 1855; the mission 
consisted of twenty-eight regular 
appointments and was what was 
called a four weeks' Circuit. It 
embraced all of Grundy and 
Mercer counties and part of 
three others, without a church 
within its bounds. He considers 
that year, though a very labor- 
ious one, one of the happiest of 
his life. In 1857-1858 he had 
the Maryville Circuit; fall of 
1858 stationed at Chillicothe; 

al°t C sv?np rt ^ CUit ' the f first year after his marriage to^fss TuSFe^'winia™ Stew! 
tc »thi %r WiJP V T tme ^J I?, 6 .?;, appointed to Keytesville Circuit; in 1865 moved 
tn JliS w U ? ed to Chilhcothe, Missouri, June 8th, 1865; soon after his re- 
Station P . P iSfiq r^'fSV^ P 4 te Cit y Station ; 1867 > P laced in charge of Weston 
he rerSiinS ?h?P P P P ^ ted ^S^S 11 *? 11 Circuit ' then P ut ° n Carrollton Station where 
Son 18? ^H«n?ih y 1 ar 5Ul 87 o 3 / N ° rborne Circui t; 1874, Moberly and Huntsville Sta- 
nXl DiSv? w^ ' Fl . f * Street Church; 1877 appointed Presiding Elder of Han- 
four ?ears thlJ wSr m f ted ? re . sidm g E1 <*er of Chillicothe District, and filled out the 
Januarv 8th 1«s\ T W + ^ Smg an appointment; 1883 Norborne Circuit. On 
hoSse Tor wJSi^p^*^ Serious acci dent, which confined him to the 
not be able to do thl w V / the . tlme Conf erence evened he felt that he would 
hhn a ^ernutSl "i r* & P ^ tor and asked to be £ iven a location, but they gavfc 
and fn wot^XS ^L5 atl ° n - T * He recovered sufficiently to preach at a few points, 

Sled aCmlnH P-S^' } £** ^ V6ry long before a new trouble devSoped, 
tated If roS T IS ° n ° f , the ™ st ' and for about three years he was incapaci- 

he never^ntirelv S?«™ °S T^ - In l 8 - 90 he met with anothe r accident from which 
the buSrv enerrZ, by haV - mg hlS T horSe run awa ^ and throwing him out of 
Imeh^M^T&nm^^T^T^ J \ WaS a l0ng time before he was able to 
to do but little fpw T m ™ e 1° hlS death ' though a ^ reat sufferer and unable 
The T names of hi, Xu^l Were aS ^f PPy and less di *Posed to murmur at their lot. 
Robert ^mmet L^l dr ™ are /s 'oHaws : Dr. Charles S. Austin, Harry W. Austin, 
Austfn ' ard S ' Austin ' Flavius L ' Austin a *d Sarah Francis 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



269> 



DR. CHARLES S. AUSTIN, A. M., M. D. 



When faith casts every trophy down at our great captain's 
Feet. — Bickersteth. 



Charles S. Austin was born 
in Carroll County, Missouri, 
November 10th, 1862. His 
father, Rev. Robert Archibald 
Austin, was born in Virginia, of 
Scotch-Wales descent, and come 
to Missouri with his mother, 
the youngest of a large fam- 
ily of children, and settled in 
Carroll county in the fall of 
1842. His mother, Matilda E. 
Austin, while Missouri-born, 
was of Kentucky parentage, the 
daughter of Dr. John S. Will- 
iams, the first physician to lo- 
cate in Chillicothe, Missouri. 
His early education was re- 
ceived in the private and public 
schools of Carrollton and Han- 
nibal, Missouri, and in the fall 
of 1878, he entered the Acad- 
emic Department of Central 
College, at Fayette, Missouri, 
where he pursued the full 
course until completed, receiving 
the degrees Bachelor of Arts, 
and in 1900 the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts. He was an active 
member of the Aristotelian Lit- 
erary Society and Y. M. C. A., 
and became a member of the 
church during a series of meet- 
ings held in the college chapel 
in 1880. Shortly after gradua- 
tion he began the study of 
medicine by first learning the 
practical workings of a phar- 
macist, and graduating in medi- 
cine from the Missouri Medical College of St. Louis, Missouri, in the spring of 1887_ 
Immediately upon his return home he formed a partnership with his early preceptor,. 
Dr. Peter E. Austin, and has continued in active work until the present time. In 
1891 he pursued an extended course of post-graduate work in New York City. In~ 
his early practice he was elected several terms to the office of Coroner of Carroll 
County, and was for several weeks Acting Sheriff of the county until a successor was 
appointed. He has filled the various offices in the county medical societies and city- 
and county Boards of Health, and was Secretary of the Board of United States 
Pension Examiners during the last Cleveland administration. For several years he- 
held the position of Surgeon with the rank of Major in the Fourth Regiment Infantry, 
National Guard of Missouri. 

In 1891 he was married to Miss Mattie C. Martin, daughter of Mr. R. G. Martin, 
of Carrollton, Missouri, to whom one son, Harold, has been born. 

For several years he has been a member and treasurer of the Board of Curators 
of Central College for Women, Lexington, Missouri, and while perhaps not an ag- 
gressive worker among the Alumni of Central College, he has usually kept well in- 
formed of progress and looks with keen gratification upon the gradual and healthy- 
growth and development of his Alma Mater and bespeaks a growth of unprecedented 
magnitude under the guidance and management of its present officers. 




270 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV ROBERT N. T. HOLLIDAY. 



Soldiers of Christ, well done! 

Praise be thy new employ. — James Montgomery. 



Rev. Robert N. T. Holliday was born in Paris, Tennessee, November 21st, 1832, 
His father, William Holliday, was a physician and a local preacher in the Methodist 
Church. Brother Holliday was converted when about sixteen years old in Tennessee, 
and from the time of his conversion until his death there was a continual upward 
tendency in his religious life until he became a mature man in Christ. He was 
licensed to preach by the Waverly, Illinois, Quarterly Conference in 1853, and was 
received into the Annual Conference on trial in 1857, at Glasgow, Missouri; Rev. 
Andrew Monroe, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Andrew presiding. He was ordained 
Deacon by Bishop Paine in September, 1859, at St. Joseph, Missouri; ordained Elder 
by Bishop Kavanaugh at Hannibal, Missouri, in August, 1865. He served the fol- 
lowing charges: St. Charles Circuit, Maysville, Stewartsville, St. Joseph Circuit, 
Weston and Platte City, Shelbyville, Canton, Hydesburg, Millville, Richmond, 
CarroUton, Louisiana, St. Charles and O'Fallon. He was married to Miss Sofiah 
Frances Deatherage, April 25th, 1853, and their children are Leston A. Holliday, 
Orlando B. Holliday, John H. Holliday and Will S. Holliday. Brother Holliday was 
a preacher of ability and at times his friends said of him that he rose to the sublime 
heights of inspired pulpit utterance. Memories of those sermons abide. Brother 
Holliday died at the home of his oldest son in Carrollton, Missouri, August 26th, 1881. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



271 



REV WILLIAM PERKINS. 



But Oh, what shall it be when we shall bask with steady wing 
And kindled eye in the overwhelming splendors of the full tide of 
Jehovah's love, unveiled and cloudless. — Dr. William E. Munsey. 



Rev. William Perkins was 
born in Goochland County, 
Virginia, August 2d, 1800. He 
was married in 1824 to Martha 
Henry, a grand daughter of 
Patrick Henry. He was licensed 
to preach in 1828 and joined 
the Missouri Conference in 
1853 and served Stations, Cir- 
cuits and Districts until super- 
annuated in 1870. He was 
graduated from Hampden Sid- 
ney College, Virginia. Though 
fifty-three years old before he 
became an itinerant, forty-three 
years were given to faithful 
work for the Master, the far- 
reaching results of which etern- 
ity alone can reveal. "Full 
many a gem of purest ray 
serene, the dark, unfathomed 
caves of ocean bear." These 
lines were never more applicable 
than to the subject of this 
sketch. He was loyal to the 
doctrines and polity of Southern 
Methodism, clinging unflinch- 
ingly to the "old ship," amid 
the raging billows of the Civil 
war. He was eloquent in the 
pulpit, soaring at times to the 
very heights of the Delectable 
Mountains. He lived well but 
preached some of his best ser- 
mons while quite on the verge 
of Heaven, as he lay upon his 
death-bed. Alluding to the bliss 
beyond he would exclaim: "Not 
only Glory, but weight of Glory; not only weight of Glory, but eternal weight of 
Glory! My way is clear!" He died triumphantly at his home in Linneus, Missouri, 
January 31st, 1871. When reared by such a father how could his children and grand- 
children fail to walk in his steps. 

Dr. P. H. Perkins, son of Rev. William Perkins, was born in Henry County, 
Virginia, January 22d, 1829. He was converted about 1843, at Old Chariton Baptist 
Church, in a meeting conducted by his father, the Rev. William Perkins, and others. 
The mourner's bench at that day was an indispensable auxiliary to a revival meeting 
and for several days he had been kneeling at the altar when a light seemed to break 
upon his way; he knew his sins were forgiven, and he has never since doubted nor 
forgotten the impression made upon him at that time. His will to do good is stronger 
than ever before. He was married the first time to Miss Mary J. Guthrie, March 
1st, 1847, and two children were born to them, Charles E. Perkins and Lulu L. 
Perkins. He was married again to Miss Martha A. Flood, April 17th, 1866, and 
four children were born of this marriage, namely, Fannie F. Perkins, Mmeola 
Perkins, William F. Perkins and Henry 0. Perkins. Mrs. Rosalie Bradley of Linneus, 
Missouri, and Mr. J. D. Perkins of California, also children of Rev. William Perkins, 
are occupying positions of honor and trust in the church, striving for the best in lite 
and for a home in Heaven. This sketch is signed by Dr. P H. Perkins, Mrs. K. b. 
Bradley, Mrs. M. E. Dryden and Dr. L. 0. Hume. 




272 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- CHARLES THOMPSON McANALLY, M.D. 



Bright o'er thy hills dawns the day-star of gladness. 

Charles Thompson McAnally, 
son of Dr. D. R. McAnally and 
Maria Thompson McAnally, was 
born in Asheville, North Caro- 
lina, April 7th, 1841. He grad- 
uated from the St. Louis Med- 
ical College when he was 
twenty-one years of age and 
immediately started South to 
join the Confederate army. He 
served as surgeon during the 
War, and at the close of the 
siege of Vicksburg, was left in 
charge of the Confederate hos- 
pital. While there he met Miss 
Elizabeth Bowie, whom he mar- 
ried, August 11th, 1865. Theii 
union was a singularly happy 
one, and to them were born five 
children, two of whom died in 
infancy, and another, Julia, 
passed away just as she was 
budding into beautiful young 
womanhood. The two surviving 
are Charles David McAnally of 
Clarence, Missouri, and Mrs. 
Margaret McAnally Blackburn 
of St. Louis. After the war he 
successfully engaged in the 
practice of his profession, but 
feeling that he was called to 
follow in the steps of his father 
and grandfathers for five gen- 
erations, he was licensed to 
preach October 31st, 1868, by 
the Quarterly Conference of 
Mount Olivet Church, Yazoo 
District, Mississippi. He was 
elected local Deacon at the twenty-fifth session of the St. Louis Conference, October 
16th, 1872, and ordained by Bishop Marvin at the Carondalet Church, March 23d, 
1873. On September 4th, 1874, he entered the Illinois Conference. Two years later 
he was ordained Elder by Bishop Paine at Jacksonville. In Illinois he served the 
following charges: Effingham, Clay City, Rome, Patoka, El Dara, Tioga, Ashley 
and Rushville District. For ten years he was Conference secretary. In 1888 he was 
transferred to the Missouri Conference and was assigned successively to Hunnewell, 
La Belle, Clarence, Callao, Breckenridge and Jamesport. His was a large faith; to 
liTm God was not a stern, unrelenting Judge, enthroned in majesty at a chilling dis- 
tance from sinning, suffering humanity, but rather a tender, loving father to whom 
he could always turn for sympathy and guidance. So he magnified prayer in his 
life. Many a time when things seemed hopelessly tangled he met the difficult situa- 
tion with "Let us pray," and as he pleaded with the Father for guidance and direc- 
tion, for Christian charity, for brotherly love, for peace — human passions subsided 
as quietly as the boisterous waves at the voice of the Master on the Sea of Gallilee. 
A book that was often in his hands was "Touching Incidents and Answers to Prayer." 
After his death we found it filled with book marks and containing many clippings 
.along the same line of thought, one of these was: 

"I know not by what methods rare, 
But this I know — God answers prayer; 
I know not when he sends the word 
That tells us fervent prayer is heard, 
I know it cometh soon or late, 
Therefore, we need to pray and wait. 
I know not if the blessing sought 
Will come in just the guise I thought, 
I leave my prayers with Him alone, 
Whose will is wiser than my own." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



273 



REV. D. M. PROCTOR. 



The Resurrection Morning is a true sun-rising; the inbursting 
Of a cloudless day on all the righteous dead.— Dr. Bushnell. 



Rev. D. M. Proctor was born 
August 6th, 1830, in McNairy 
County, Tennessee. He was a 
son of John C. Proctor and 
Mary Proctor, both of whom 
joined the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. South, after their son 
had united with that church. 
He was converted in July, 1848, 
at Ebenezer Church, Memphis, 
Conference, under the ministry 
of Rev. Levi Lee, and joined 
that church at the same t : me. 
A saving influence came with 
his marriage to a very religious 
wife in his nineteenth year. His 
conversion was sudden and with- 
out a doubt in regard io the par- 
don of his sins. Brother Proc- 
tor wrote, "Many times have I 
been like David, 'All thy waves 
and thy billows arc gone over 
me,' yet under the most trying 
circumstances, through which I 
have passed, the blessed Master 
has come to my grief- stricken 
soul and said 'Be not afraid, 
it is I.' " He was licensed to 
preach by the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Mt. Vernon Circuit in 
July, 1856; Rev. James McGe- 
hee, preacher in charge, and 
Rev. T. T. Ashby, Presiding 
Elder; the same Quarterly Con- 
ference recommended him to the 
Annual Conference in 1858, and 
he was received into the Annual 
Conference that year; Rev. 
Thomas T. Ashby, Presiding Elder, and Bishop George F. Pierce, presiding. He 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh, October 14th, 1860: was ordained 
Elder by Bishop Robert Paine, November 13th, 1864, at Aberdeen, Mississippi. He 
served the following appointments: Enon Mission, 1858-1859; Steeleville Circuit, 
1859-1860; Stockton Circuit, 1860-1861; Springfield Circuit, 1860-1861; no appointment 
from 1861 to 1863; Coffeyville, 1864-1865; Richmond, 1865-1867; Liberty, 1867-1869; 
Pans Circuit, 1869-1871; Honey Grove Circuit, 1871-1873; Superannuated, 1873-1874; 
bylvan Circuit, 1874-1875; Robinsonville Circuit, 1875-1876; Greenville Circuit, 1876- 
1878; Nevada, Southwest Missouri Conference, 1878-1879; Jefferson Circuit, North 
Texas Conference, 1879-1880; Agent for North Texas Female College, 1880-1881; 
Henrietta and Wichita Falls Mission, 1882-1883; Linneus, 1883-1884; Carrollton, 1885- 
1887; Osborn Circuit, 1887-1889; Platte City and Weston Circuit, 1889-1890; and 
other charges. He received about one thousand persons into the church. Dr. Shot- 
well, now of Gainesville, Texas, Rev. James H. Shaw, and Rev. Malcolm Henry, were 
among the men who were converted under his ministry. About seven churches, and 
one parsonage were built, and several parsonages bought and repaired under his 
pastorates. Brother Proctor was twice married, the first time to Miss Mary C. Fow- 
ler, to whom he was married in August, 1848 ; and the second time to Mrs. Mary 
M. Hudgins. 




274 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV LOVIC PIERCE LAW, EVANGELIST. 



A Christian is God's knight-errant in the earth, sworn to fealty 
To society and to the common weal of all the world. — Dr. Wil- 
liam A. Quayle. 



Lovic Pierce Law was 
named after the won- 
derful old patriarch of 
Methodism, Lovic 
Pierce, but he tried for 
many years to keep out 
of the avocation of the 
worthy man for whom 
he was named, but at 
last submitted to the 
gentle influences of the 
Holy Spirit and the lov- 
ing entreaties of a 
Godly father and moth- 
er and gave himself to 
the Lord and ministry. 
He was born in Bos- 
que County, Texas, at 
the little town of Ire- 
dell, where at that time 
his father was an itin- 
erant Circuit Rider in 
the Methodist Church, 
South. He moved with 
his parents afterwards 
to San Saba, Rockdale, 
Davilia, Chappel Hill, 
and other points in 
Texas, where his father 
was pastor. For many 
years after attaining 
the years of manhood, 
he felt the call to 
preach, but seeing the 
hardships ensuing from 
a consecrated Christian 
life of a preacher, he 
ran from God, and for 
several years was Dep- 
uty Marshal and United 
States Jailer in the In- 
dian Territory and had 
followed almost every 
calling making partial 
successes, yet at all 
times feeling the call 
to preach, but refusing 
, to obey. The crowning 

event seems to have culminated in the great Galveston storm, when on that eventful 
night God again called his vows to remembrance and urged that they be paid. He 
aiterward drifted to Cameron, Texas, and became manager and lessee of the Cameron 
upera Mouse and while in this capacity rented the opera house for an Evangelistic 
service, conducted by the Late W. P Fife, Drummer Evangelist, and under his 
ministry gave his heart to God and ever since has been a faithful Minister of the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ. Brother Law is wonderfully blessed in having one of the 
best wives in the world, who ably assists him in his Evangelistic work in addition 
to his Gospel Singer who handles the great Chorus Choirs. He has worked a great 
™L J 5- Ml i soui : 1 ^ nd our churches have felt and seen a great uplift and Missouri 
Methodism has had many added to the church through his faithful efforts. 
His work is his best recommendation. 

Brother Law and Brother John E. Brown for years have been connected bv the 
strongest friendship ties as well as in business life, and are today much like Jones 
and Stewart in their devotion to each other. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



275 




REV WILLIAM E. TINNEY 



Fly on, blessed Gospel! Make men's nature love, their character 
Holiness, and thus eternally establish the law divine. — Dr. Wm. 
E. Munsey. 



Rev. William E. Tinney is the son of Alfred Tinney and Mary Elizabeth Tin- 
ney, both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was born April 
28th, 1871, at Memphis, Scotland County, Missouri. He was converted in November, 
1896, at Memphis, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. R. F. Campbell, and joined 
the church at that time. He had a bright conversion, and this conversion changed 
the whole course of his life. He has made good progress in the divine life, and the 
way grows brighter all the while. He was licensed to preach April 22nd, 1898, by 
the Macon District Conference, Rev. John Anderson, D. D., Presiding Elder. He was 
recommended to the Annual Conference for admission on trial by the same District 
Conference at the same time and he was received into the Annual Confrence on trial 
in September, 1898; Rev. John Anderson, D. D., Presiding Elder, and Bishop W A. 
Candler, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop W. A. Candler, at St. Joseph, 
Missouri, September 8th, 1901; ordained Elder by Bishop Chas. B. Galloway, Septem- 
ber 6th, 1903, at Mexico, Missouri. He has served the following charges: Brashear 
Circuit, two years; Humphreys Circuit, two years; Bogard Circuit, three years; Lin- 
neus Circuit, two years. About two hundred and fifty persons have been received into 
the church under his ministry. Baird's Chapel, in Carroll County, has been built, 
the church remodeled at Purdin, Missouri, and the parsonage remodeled at Humphreys, 
Missouri, under his pastorates. Brother Tinney received his education in the public 
school at Memphis, Missouri, and at Centenary College, Palmyra, Missouri. Sep- 
tember 3rd, 1891, he was married to Miss Linnie Darling, and their children are: 
Frank Alfred Tinney, William Craig Tinney and Ruth Tinney. The most important 
crisis in his life, aside from his conversion and his call to preach, was the call to the 
Evangelistic field, which he was four years considering, but finally yielded to it in 
March, 1907. Some of the books which have been helpful to him, aside from the 
Bible, are Gipsy Smith's Biography, Wesley's Sermons, Homiletic Review, Matthew 
Henry's Commentary. Brother Tinney believes the higher education of our young 
people should be given over to the church. He has learned how to hold successful 
revivals of religion and to bring up all of his church work. 



276 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- TYSON S. DINES. 



Faith walks across the unstable wave, and climbs the steeps of 
Air. — Dr. F B. Meyer. 

Tyson S. Dines was born in 
Dorchester County, Maryland, 
1811; converted at Ennal's 
Campground at twenty-one years 
of age; was licensed to preach 
by Dorchester Circuit Quarterly 
Conference, 1837; was employed 
on Northampton Circuit, 1838, 
by Rev. Levi Scott, Presiding 
Elder; came to Missouri, 1839, 
and was employed on the Shel- 
byville Circuit as junior preach- 
er. He entered the Missouri 
Conference in September, with 
Rev. W- G. Chapel and others, 
and returned to Shelby ville Cir- 
cuit. His name disappears from 
the roll in 1849. He returned to 
Virginia and married. In 1845 
he settled permanently in Mis- 
souri and from that time was 
identified with the work and his- 
tory of the church here. He was 
sent to Waterloo Circuit, 1845, 
and to Fayette, 1846. In 1847, 
he was ordained Elder and sent 
West for Mission work with 
Thos. Johnson; returned to Mis- 
souri next year and served Shel- 
by ville Circuit; superannuated, 
1849; Quincy, 1850; Louisiana, 
1851; Hannibal, 1852; traveled, 
1853; Fayette District, 1854; 
Agent for Conference Tract So- 
ciety, 1855; superannuated, 1856 
to 1857; Glasgow, 1858-1859; St. 
Charles, 1860-1861; in St. Louis 
County during the troubled 
period of 1862-1865, yet preach- 
, , . . ing at Flint Hill and other 

?Qco e i an e m£ 0ul i d ' Su P er annuated, 1866; and at Richmond, 1867-1868; Brunswick, 
18b9-1870. 1 he last appointment was Shelbyville Station, 1872. Then came years 
of suffering until his death, February 15th, 1881. 

ti, ¥ r ' P. mes ™ as a man of strong convictions, and hence preached a pointed gospel. 
Ihe teachings that seemed to be erroneous found no place of rest with him. Tradi- 
tion tells of discussions and debates with a famous preacher of another order and 
victory according to the admission of his opponent. Yet love predominated even 
toward those of other faiths. "He was not afraid to think; he had opinions upon 
all the current questions of his time, and being a man of studious habits, and of 
strong convictions, it was but natural that he should be tenacious of his own opin- 
ions In his pulpit ministrations he was earnest, guarded and safe. He relied for 
results upon a lucid statement of the truth, rather than upon rhetorical devices. 
His Christian character was so well developed and so well known as to need no 
analysis here; all will remember him as a man of spotless life and unfaltering in- 
tegrity, the material of which martyrs are made. He combined with a warm and 
generous nature a rich experience of divine things." In his last sickness, after years 
sutteremg he said: "I would like to be permitted to preach one more sermon 
on iaith; 1 think I understand it better than ever before." His sufferings were the 
nre to rehne him and he wept for joy in the midst of affliction. With other strong 
men of his day he towers as some mighty oak of the forest. His name is blessed, 
for he helped to bring in the present day of success. Mr. Dines was a member of 
the General Conference of 1858, held at Nashville, Tennessee, and was elected to 
the Conference of 1862. That was not held on account of the war. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



27T 



MR. JACOB A. MERCHANT. 



Virtue alone outbuilds the pyramids; 

Her monuments shall last, when Egypt's fall. — Young. 



Jacob A. Merchant was born 
March 13th, 1837, near what is 
now the beautiful little "Bor- 
der City" of the South— Bris- 
tol — located on the border line 
of Tennessee and Virginia — on 
the Virginia side of the line. 
His parents came to Missouri 
in 1847, when he was a ten 
year old lad, and located in 
Brunswick, where he has resi- 
ded ever since. He was educa- 
ted in the public schools, and, 
at the age of fourteen years, 
entered one of the largest mer- 
cantile houses of that place, 
which at that time, was one of 
the largest commercial centers 
in Missouri; its trade reaching 
out far North, beyond the Iowa 
line, which was designated as 
the "Grand River Country." 
This was before the "iron horse" 
ventured T^'est of the Mississippi 
river. Soon thereafter, he was 
placed in charge of the books 
and office of Nova & Adaman- 
tine Johnson, a well known bus- 
iness house of that day, which 
did an immense business in this 
belt of country, then tributary 
to Brunswick. Upon the reor- 
ganization of this old firm, he 
was given an interest in, and 
made junior member of the new 
firm while he had not yet 
reached the age of twenty-one 
years. In January, 1858, he be- 
c <* m ?< converted and joined the Methodist Church during a revival conducted by 
the "Great and Gifted Caples." Upon the retiring of the Johnson firm, he embarked 
m business, on his own account, in 1860, in which he continued until 1875. He then 
entered the Banking House of Plunkett and Merchant, which was finally merged 
m ^° the Chariton County Exchange Bank, which he organized in 1877, and was elec- 
ted Cashier, and this position he has held ever since, having been engaged in banking 
for over thirty years. In December, 1866, he was married to Miss Plunkett, and 
this union has been blessed with three daughters and one son. His home has ever 
been one of old time hospitality, where his many friends, and especially the minis- 
y» are a }ways welcome. In this home he has one of the best rooms set apart as 
a Memorial Room," and in this has nicely arranged all the ancient furniture with 
which his parents commenced housekeeping, away back in 1835, and which he has 
preserved all these long years, together with quite a number of interesting articles 
of his boyhood days. Mr. Merchant is gifted with a remarkable memory, and is 
regarded, among his friends, as a "walking encyclopedia" on the current events 
and dates of the past half century — seldom ever forgetting a name or face. In 1894,. 
he was chosen one of the members of the Board of Missions of the Missouri Confer- 
ence of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he has been Treasurer ever 
since, making one of the most efficient and painstaking Treasurers the church has 
ever had. And now, though nearing the three score and ten mile post in life's journey, 
he is as vigorous, active and attentive to business as most men of many years his 
junior in age. During this long period of time, he has not been absent from his 
post of duty as much as thirty days on account of sickness. 




278 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MRS. P. P. MUNSEY 



The Incarnate Son is the infinite yearning of God toward Man. 

— Bishop Marvin. 



Permelia P. Munsey was born 
on Cripple Creek, Wythe County, 
Virginia, November 16th, 1812. 
She was the daughter of Reuben 
and Mollie Hill. Her grand- 
father Hill was a Baptist preach- 
er in Virginia for about seventy- 
five years. Her brother, James 
Hill, was long a Methodist 
preacher". He was called by the 
boys "Old Camp Meeting," on 
account of the melody of his 
song, beauty of his exhortation 
and the power of his prayer. 
Her mother was named Wool- 
dridge. Several of the Wool- 
dridge family were preachers — 
one belongs to the Oklahoma 
Conference. She was married at 
the age of twenty to David Mun- 
sey, son of Rev. Zachariah Mun- 
sey, who was a local preacher 
in the Holston Conference. He 
was among the most eccentric, 
brainful and successful preach- 
ers of his day. Her husband be- 
came a preacher, and was mur- 
dered by parties under the in- 
fluence of whiskey in Georgia, 
in 1869. Grandma Munsey, (as 
she was called for years) , came 
to Missouri in 1867 and settled 
in the forks of Grand River, on 
the Spring Hill Circuit, Mis- 
souri Conference. Her first pas- 
tor was the pious, sainted S. W 
Cope. Her first Presiding Elder 
the big hearted, happy Willis 
E. Dockery. From girlhood she was one of the most potent, religious factors in the 
church wherever she held membership. How many preachers who were fed from her 
table, clothed from her wheel and loom, have and will call her blessed. She prayed, ex- 
horted and shouted through the class meetings and camp meetings. For many years 
she was a member of Mt. Olive Class, Spring Hill Circuit. She died at the age of 
eighty-three and is buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery. Her children, William Elbert Mun- 
sey, D. D., who sleeps at Jonesborough, Tennessee; Nancy Jane Tracy, so gifted and 
devout, who rests in a country grave yard in Virginia; Permelia D. Wilson, President 
of the Woman's Home Missionary Society, Colorado Springs; Mary L. Alnutt, long 
a devoted member of the church at Chillicothe, Missouri, now of Chattanooga, Tenn- 
essee; Sarah M. Tracy, many years President of the Woman's Home Missionary 
Society of Neosho Circuit, Southwest Missouri Conference; also Rev. J. D. Z. Munsey, 
of Oklahoma Conference. Permelia P. Munsey has been the Susanna Wesley, or 
Mother of Methodism in a number of places. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



279- 



REV JOHN R. DIVELBISS. 



And they shall see His face. — St. John. 



By Rev. Geo. J. Warren. 

Rev. John R. Divelbiss was 
born near Tinney's Grove, Ray 
County, Missouri, March 24th, 
1857. He was converted and 
joined the church in June, 1874, 
under the ministry of Revs. J. 
L. Meffert and H. T. Leeper. 
He joined the Missouri Confer- 
ence in September, 1884, and 
traveled various charges in this 
Conference until September, 
1892, when at the call of the 
church for volunteers, he was 
transferred by Bishop Gallo- 
way to the Indian Mission Con- 
ference, and stationed at El 
Reno, Oklahoma. He was or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop E. R. 
Hendrix at Mexico, Missouri, in 
September, 1887, and Elder by 
Bishop Joseph S. Key, at Fay- 
ette, Missouri, in September, 
1889. He was married to Miss 
Mary C. Adams, of Chariton 
County, Missouri, May 3rd, 
1892. To them was born one 
child, a son, who with the wife 
are left to the care of the 
church and the sympathy of 
God. His pastorate at El Reno 
was successful, though short. 
Scarce four months had passed, 
when he was stricken with dis- 
ease, which resulted in his 
death at the residence of Dr. 
Garnett, near Keytesville, Mis- 
souri, July 6th, 1893. He was 
buried near where he was born, . . , , . 

and born again, to await the resurrection of the just. Thus passed from labor to 
rest and reward a faithful Christian minister. He died as he had lived, trusting in 
Christ, his present Saviour. Through his long and painful illness no murmur or com- 
plaint escaped his lips; he bore his suffering with the fortitude of a Christian soldier, 
trusting implicity his Great Captain; ready to do or die at His command, l Knew 
our departed brother longer and more intimately than any other member ot our uon- 
f erence, and I want to pay this loving tribute to his memory. He was a pure mi noea, 
pure hearted Christian man; a faithful, diligent, brave and humble minister ot tna- 
gospel; a true, genial, confiding, faithful friend. He leaves to his now bereaved wile 
and infant son the heritage of a good name and the memory of a well spent nie, io 
his brethren an example of fidelity unto death; to the church the honor ot being tne 
mother of so pure and true a son. God bless the widow in her sorrow and loneliness, 
and care for the orphan in its helplessness, fulfilling His promise, bister Mary ^. 
Divelbiss lives to care for her son, Warren Anderson Divelbiss, and it is to oe 
hoped that he will come to noble manhood. The parents of Brother Divelbliss iivein 
Braymer, Missouri, and a brother, Judge Frank P. Divelbiss, lives in Richmond, Mis- 
souri. He is Judge of Probate in Ray County. 




1^0 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. HENRY THOMAS LEEPER. 



Love at its divinest consummation is self-sacrifice. — Bishop Hay- 
good. 



Rev. Henry Thomas Leeper 
was born July 3rd, 1836, near 
Spring Hill, Missouri. His par- 
ents, John L. Leeper and Aman- 
da F. Leeper, were Methodists 
all their lives. He was convert- 
ed August 20th, 1845, under the 
ministry of Rev. Horace Brown, 
who held a meeting near his 
home at Spring Hill. His father 
and mother had given him quite 
a good deal of instruction on 
the subject of religion. He had 
been concerned for some time 
about his soul's salvation and 
had gone up to the altar with 
a very heavy heart, but sud- 
denly a wonderful light broke 
in upon his soul and he was 
gloriously converted. His growth 
has been increasing continually 
since that time and he feels to- 
day the fullness of His love in 
his heart. He was licensed to 
preach July 15th, 1868, by the 
Quarterly Conference of Spring 
Hill Circuit; Rev. W. E. Dock- 
ery, Presiding Elder, and Rev. 
S. W. Cope, preacher in charge; 
the Quarterly Conference of the 
Chillicothe District recommend- 
ed him to the Annual Conference 
in August, 1872 ; he was received 
into the Annual Conference in 
1874; Rev. S. W. Cope, Presid- 
ing Elder, and Bishop J. C. 
Keener, presiding. He was or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop Wight- 
man, September 14th, 1873, at Carrollton, Missouri; was ordained Elder by Bishop 
D. S. Doggett, September 15th, 1878, at Macon Missouri. He has served the follow- 
ing appointments: Pleasant Park, two years; Mandeville, two years; Bedford, two 
years; Kingston, two years; Mandeville, one year; Maysville, two years; Dearborn, 
two years; Lineville, two years; Edinburgh, two years; Jamesport, one year; Breck- 
enridge, one year; Pattonsburg, one year; Jameson, three years; Ashland, two years; 
Clifton Hill, three years. He has received one thousand one hundred and sixty-eight 
persons into the church. Quite a number of churches and parsonages have been built 
under his pastorates. Far West, Bethel, a church on the Ashland Circuit; parsonages 
at Mandeville, Dearborn, Jameson. He attended several private schools, one at 
Chillicothe, and Central College, Fayette, Missouri. He was married to Miss Cor- 
delia Leeper, in December, 1869, and their children are, David R. Leeper, Margaret 
H. Knight, James E. Leeper, Ruby L. Cammock. Baxter's "Saints Rest" and Pilgrim's 
Progress, are two books which have greatly helped him. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT 



281 



REV- ERASMUS MARION CAPP. 



Ipse autem Deus pads sanctificet vos totos. 

And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly. 



-St. Paul. 



Rev. Erasmus Marion Capp, 
son of Michael P Capp and 
Margaret J. Capp, both very 
staunch believers in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South, 
was born in Monroe County, 
Missouri, January 2nd, 1857. 
He was converted in 1875, at 
Cairo, Missouri, in a meeting 
held by Rev. Thomas De Moss, 
and joined the church at the 
close of that meeting. As he 
sat in the congregation under 
deep conviction, examining his 
past life, a friend came to him, 
and putting his arm around 
him, asked him if he wasn't 
ready to give himself to Jesus. 
He gave himself to God that 
night, and thinks he was called 
to preach in 1878, but did not 
yield until 1885, when he burned 
all the bridges behind him and 
ntered the service of the Lord 
in the ministry. The past five 
years have been years of deeper 
hungering for soul winning. He 
was licensed to preach by the 
Quarterly Conference of the 
Cairo Circuit in 1885 ; Rev. John 
Payton, preacher in charge, and 
Rev. J. P. Nolan, D. D., Presid- 
ing Elder. He was recommend- 
ed to the Annual Conference for 
admission on trial by the same 
Quarterly Conference, August 
1st, 1886, and was received into 
the Annual Conference, September, 1886, Rev. J. P. Nolan, Presiding Elder, and Bishop 
H. N. McTyeire, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop E. R. Hendrix at 
Gallatin, Missouri, September 9th, 1888, and ordained Elder by Bishop Joseph S. 
Key at Fayette, Missouri, Septemmber 14th, 1890. Appointments filled are: Queen 
City Circuit, 1886, two years; Brashear Circuit, 1888, two years; Callao Circuit, 1890, 
one year; Laplata Circuit, 1891, three years; Brashear Circuit, 1894, one year; Paris 
Circuit, 1895, three years; Palmyra Circuit, 1898, two years; Fayette Circuit, 1900, 
one year; Callao Circuit, 1901; closed that year caused by the death of Rev. D. M. 
Proctor; Norborne Circuit, 1902, one year; DeWitt Circuit, 1903, one year; Chillicothe 
Circuit, 1904, two years; and his present charge. He has received about five hundred 
persons into the church during his ministry, and has improved quite a number of 
churches and parsonages. He attended Central College ten months. He was married 
to Miss Euphema C. Huntsman, April 3rd, 1879, and his children are Inez J. Capp, 
Margaret Ruth Capp and Nona May Beery, wife of Rev. J. K. Beery. The books 
which have been very helpful to him aside from the Bible, are "Half Hours of St. 
Paul," "Ralston's Elements of Divinity," "Watson's Institutes," "Life of McKendree," 
"Life of Dr. J. B. McFerrin," "Marvin's Life and Book of Sermons." He advocates very 
strongly the Christian College as furnishing the highest type of Christian education for 
young men and women. 




282 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV ELMORE CARLYLE. 



His presence in the soul is a life-expanding and a life-glorifying 
Presence. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Rev. Elmore Carlyle was born in Livingston County, Missouri, November 2nd, 
1842. He was baptized and received into the church by the Rev. W- T. Ellington in 
1858. He came into the ministry in the regular way by being licensed to exhort in 
April and to preach the following August, 1862. His first appointment to do pastoral 
work was by Rev. W E. Dockery, Presiding Elder of the Chillicothe District. Brother 
Dockery appointed him in April, 1866, to the Chillicothe Circuit, which work he served 
to the best of his ability until the meeting of the Annual Conference. His next 
appointment was to the Milan Circuit in Sullivan County, Missouri, in March, 1867, 
Rev. W. E. Dockery, Presiding Elder. It was while serving this charge that he 
achieved the greatest success of his ministerial life, there being something more than 
three hundred conversions and additions to the church during the two and one half 
years he spent there. He was received on trial into the Missouri Conference at 
Macon City in September, 1867, and ordained Deacon by Bishop Marvin. Four years 
later, at the Conference in Palmyra, he was ordained Elder by Bishop D. S. Dog- 
gett. He traveled the Milan Circuit, two and one half years; the LaGrange Circuit, 
two years; Alexandria Circuit, two years; Memphis Circuit, two years; Edina Circuit, 
two years; Linneus Circuit, three years. While serving the Linneus Circuit the 
third year his health failed. He is now one of our superannuated preachers, and he 
suffers the divine will, as he once did that will. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



283 



REV WARD COOK MAGGART. 



God our friend Christ our living Redeemer, our sympathizing 
Brother.— Dr. Frederick W- Robertson. 



Rev. Ward Cook Maggart was 
born in West Virginia in 1839. 
His father, Samuel Maggart, 
and mother, Nancy Maggart, 
were both members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South. 
He was converted when a boy 
under the ministry of Rev. Wil- 
liam Shaw and joined the church 
at that time. He was converted 
while at secret prayer in the 
grove and has never had a doubt 
about his conversion since that 
time, and during the last fifteen 
years has had a continuous 
growth in grace. He was licensed 
to preach in 1868, by the Quar- 
terly Conference held at Elm- 
wood, Sullivan County, Mis- 
souri; Rev. S. S. Hardin, pastor, 
and Rev. S. W. Atterberry, Pre- 
siding Elder. He was recom- 
mended to the Annual Confer- 
ence by the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Black Oak, Caldwell 
County, Missouri; Rev. R. A. 
Austin, Presiding Elder, and 
he was received into the Annual 
Conference at Moberly, Missouri* 
in 1881; Rev. R. A. Austin, 
Presiding Elder. He was or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop John 
C. Keener in 1874; ordained El- 
der by Bishop David S. Doggett 
in 1878. He has filled the fol- 
lowing appointments: Tinney's 
Grove, two years; Breckenridge, 
one year; Chillicothe Circuit, 
two years; Triplett, two years; DeWitt, two years; Alexander Chapel, three years; 
ivahoka Circuit, one year; Palmyra Circuit, two years; Maywood Circuit, one year; 
iNovelty, one year; Center, Ralls County, two years; Florida, two years; New Florence, 
two years; Mound City, one year; Eagleville, one year. Quite a number have been 
p J 1 .y^ rted an 4 received into the church under his ministry. Centenary Church, on the 
t/hillicothe Circuit, was built under his pastorate, and the church at Mooresville was 
nnished under his direction. He received his education in the pubic schools of his 
day. He was married to Miss Sarah Garew in 1858, and the names of their children 
are as follows: Richard W. Maggart, Nancy E. Maggart, Amanda C. Maggart, 
Alexander H. Maggart, Eliza J. Maggart, Margaret E. Maggart, Jessie L. Maggart, 
Ida Lee Maggart and Rev. L. C. Maggart. Two boys, Melvin N. Maggart and Alfred 
Maggart, are now dead. Brother Maggart considers the Christian College as a great 
aid to the church. Brother Maggart is one of the useful men of the Missouri Con- 
ference. Now that the latter days have come, may the God and Father of all grace 
be with him. 




284 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. HENRY NEIGHBOURS. 



Revocate animos, maestumque timorem Mittite. — Virgil. 
Resume your courage, and dismiss your fear. — Dryden. 



Rev. Henry Neighbours, son 
of John Neighbours and Nancy 
Neighbours, both of whom are 
members of the Methodist 
Church, was born in Green 
County, Illinois, November 16th, 
1868. He was very clearly and 
wonderfully converted when 
thirteen years of age at a camp 
meeting held about twelve miles 
South of Jacksonville, Illinois, 
and joined the church at Mt. 
Zion, Methodist Episcopal 
Church, in Morgan County, Ill- 
inois, during the ministry of 
Rev. S. G. Ferree. While kneel- 
ing in prayer in his father's 
tent, during a special prayer 
service conducted by Brother L. 
B. Kent, he realized, as an in- 
stant flash of light, that his sins 
were forgiven, and he felt as 
if he had stepped from out a 
dark dungeon into the clear, 
bright light of the noonday sun; 
the trees seemed crowned with a 
radiant light and all heaven and 
nature seemed to sing together 
a heavenly anthem of praise to 
the Creator of all. During a re- 
vival in a country church the 
following winter, conducted by 
Rev. S. G. Ferree, while work- 
ing for the salvation of souls 
and praying God for greater 
spiritual power in the work of 
winning souls, the spirit of 
truth opened the way and led 
him to understand more of God's fullness and love; his will for doing good was 
greatly strengthened, and as he worked for Him, learned to love Him more, and 
loving Him more, was filled with a greater love for all mankind. He was licensed 
to preach in the spring of 1901, by the St. Joseph District Conference at Rockport, 
Missouri; Rev. V. 0. White, of Centenary Chuch, St. Joseph, Missouri, was preacher 
in charge at that time, and Rev. W. F. McMurry, D. D., was Presiding Elder. He 
was recommended to the Missouri Annual Conference for admission on trial by the 
Chillicothe District Conference, held at DeWitt, Missouri, April 17th, 1902, and was 
received into the Missouri Annual Conference in the fall of 1902, at Chillicothe, 
Missouri; Rev. M. L. Gray was Presiding Elder and Bishop A. W. Wilson presided 
at this Annual Conference. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop E. R. Hendrix at 
Columbia, Missouri, September, 1904. He served at Green Castle one year as supply; 
from there he went to Humphreys, where he served two years, and from there to 
Hale, Missouri, where he served two years; Mt. Olive Circuit. Forty-eight persons 
have been received into the church during the four years of his ministry; his edu- 
cation was received at the High School in Illinois and the Missouri Wesleyan College 
at Cameron, Missouri. He was married to Miss Mary Noble, December 18th, 1895, 
and has one child, Ray E. Neighbours. He considers the most important crisis in 
his life was when he yielded to the call of God and entered His service in the min- 
istry. He considers the Christian College as of very great importance in the devel- 
opment of men of character; he deems the moral and intellectual atmosphere, as well 
as the religious influences, of Christian schools very essential and potent factors 
for good. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



285 



REV JOSEPH N. BOYD. 



This life is a study that shall forever unfold, in wondrous 
Beauty, the love and faithfulness of God. — Dr. Bushnell. 



Rev. Joseph N. Boyd was 
born in Clinton County, Mis- 
souri, near Plattsburg, March 
11th, 1872. He is a son of Al- 
fred R. Boyd and Margaret E. 
Boyd, both of whom were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He was con- 
verted in Richmond, Missouri, 
under the ministry of Rev. J. 
H. Ledbetter, and joined the 
church in March, 1889. He had 
been under conviction for many 
months and at times sought the 
Lord with earnest purpose of 
heart. It was a difficult thing 
for him to reach the surrender, 
but after some days of seeking, 
and a night spent in prayer, he 
made the surrender; then light 
came and the peace of God was 
his soul's possession. He has 
grown in the knowledge of the 
truth and the deeper things of 
God, and each year there has 
been a stronger purpose to do 
the will of God and to enter 
more fully into the spirit of the 
Master. He is striving to pos- 
sess each day that love which 
casteth out fear and makes man 
more like his Lord. He was 
licensed to preach by the 
Plattsburg District Conference 
in March, 1896; Rev. W. F. 
McMurry, D. D., was preacher 
in charge, and Dr. E. K. Miller, 
Presiding Elder; was recom- 
mended to the Annual Conference by this same District Conference in April, 1899. 
He was received into the Annual Conference in 1899, Rev. C. Grimes, Presiding Elder, 
and Bishop John C. Granbery, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Warren 
A. Candler, in 1901, at St. Joseph, Missouri; was ordained Elder at Mexico, Missouri, 
by Bishop Charles B. Galloway, in September, 1903. He has served the following 
appointments: Supply on Parkville Circuit, one year; Cameron, one year; Kearney 
and Holt, one year; Polo Circuit, two years; Milan Station, three years; he is now 
serving his first year at Norborne Station. He has received into the church four 
hundred and sixty-six persons. The parsonage at Milan was built under his pastorate. 
He attended Richmond High School, Central College and Woodson Institute. He was 
graduated from these institutions and taught one year in Woodson Institute. He 
was married to Miss Lolla J. Woods, January 2nd, 1901, and they have one little girl, 
Margaret Elizabeth Boyd. He considers his conversion and call to the ministry as 
possibly the most important crisis in his life. Some of the books which have helped 
him most, aside from the Bible, are Shakespeare's Works, The Revival and the Pas- 
tor, the Pastor and Modern Missions, Stevens History of Methodism, Menzie's History 
of Religions, Plutarch's Lives of Illustrious Men, Skilled Labor for the Master, and 
some of the books on the social question, viz: Jesus Christ and the Social Question, 
and The Social Message of the Modern Pulpit. 




286 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



■■■yy-y ■■■ ■■■■:■:■■:-■■■:■' . 




MILAN CHURCH. 



REV- H. L. DAVENPORT, PASTOR. 

Rev. Ward M. Baker was the builder of this elegant new church at Milan, Mis- 
souri. He prayed this house into being. Our people at Milan did nobly. Rev. Dr. 
W. F. McMurry dedicated this church. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



287 




REV HARRY L. DAVENPORT. 



The Kingdom of God is collecting its energies for the final 
Campaign for the Conquest of the world. — Bishop Marvin. 



By Prof. C. F. Johns, 
Principal High School, Milan, Missouri. 



Harry L. Davenport is a native of Illinois. His parents were Kentuckians. He 
is a namesake of the great Virginia general of Revolutionary War fame, General 
Harry Lee. 

Mr. Davenport attended McKendree College, Lebanon, Illinois, and was a pupil 
°f Professor Perry, instructor in elocution at the Washington University, St. Louis. 
When only a youth, Dr. John Matthews gave Mr. Davenport a course of instruction 
in theology. Evangelistic work lay nearest his heart, and at the earliest possible 
time he began this work. It is estimated that more than 7,000 persons united with 
the various churches as the result of his evanegilstic labors. He has preached at many 
of the camp meetings, and in most of the large cities of the Central West. 

Believing, sooner or later, the city slum problem will prove a stubborn question to 
the American churches, Mr. Davenport spent two years superintending a Red Cross 
Endeavor work, laboring with the slums in Chicago, St. Louis and Milwaukee. The 
moral, social and economic questions of the slums were studied. 

Rev. Mr. Davenport is not inexperienced in the pastorate. He has served as 
pastor a number of years, four of which were in the St. Louis District of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He is now a member of the Chillicothe District Confer- 
ence, from which body he was recommended to the Annual Conference for admission. 
He is pastor of the Milan Station Methodist Episcopal Church, South, to which 
place Bishop Key appointed him in 1906. 



288 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV W. J. PARVIN. 



Pace per sanguinem Crucis ejus facta, per cum, 
Reconciliare omnia sibi. 

Having made peace through the blood of His cross, 
By Him to reconcile all things unto Himself. — St. Paul. 



Rev. W. J. Parvin, son of Silas Parvin and Melissie (Thorpe) Parvin, was born 
in Cole County, Missouri, near Jefferson City, April 18th, 1864. He was converted 
in Clinton County, Missouri, through influences set in motion by Rev. L. B. Madison, 
who was pastor of the Methodist Church at Perrin, Missouri, and was converted on 
November 9th, 1885, while on the way to his brother's home at sunrise in the morning. 
He saw the fruits of the Christian religion in the lives of some faithful ones, and 
although skeptical in regard to many things, determined to thoroughly investigate its 
truthfulness. After eight months of seeking, during which time he read the New 
Testament through four times, he was happily and consciously pardoned of sin and 
regenerated by His grace. His spiritual development has been gradual, and his asso- 
ciation with men in the Master's work has greatly helped him. His faith grows more 
satisfactory with the lapse of time, and his heart is fixed in the purpose to serve God 
to the end. He was licensed to preach, December 20th, 1890, by the Quarterly Con- 
ference of Osborn Circuit, at Perrin, Missouri; Rev. R. W Howerton, preacher in 
charge, and Rev. J. M. O'Bryen, Presiding Elder; was recommended to the Annual 
Conference for admission on trial by the Missouri City Quarterly Conference held at 
Ingle Chapel, August 8th, 1891, and was received into the Missouri Annual Conference 
on trial, in 1891; Rev. John M. O'Bryen, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Hargrove, pre- 
siding; ordained Deacon by Bishop Haygood at Monroe City, September 17th, 1893; 
ordained Elder by Bishop Charles B. Galloway, at Hannibal, Missouri, September 6th, 
1896. Appointments filled: Parkville and Moscow, 1891-1892; Edgerton, 1892-1895; 
Millville, 1895-1897; Auxvasse, 1897-1899; St. Joseph Circuit, 1899-1900; Fairfax, 
1900-1903; Linneus, 1903-1905; Brunswick, 1905, which is the present pastorate. 
About 600 persons have been received into the Church during the years of his min- 
istry. The Church at Auxvasse was built under his pastorate, and a small chapel at 
Moscow. He obtained his education at the common schools. He was married to 
Miss Lulu Gray Prather, September 14th, 1892, and has one child, Julian Aldean Parvin. 
The hour when he decided to seek God as a personal Savior, which was eight months 
before his conversion, and the time when, after a struggle of five years, he settled the 
question of entering the ministry, have been the important crises in his life. Some 
of the books which have benefited him most are Watson's Institutes, Ralston's Ele- 
ments of Divinity, Personal Salvation, by Dean Tillett; Christian Character, by Chap- 
man, and the Man of Galilee, by Haygood. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT, 



289 




JUDGE LLOYD H. HERRING. 



Here, rather than on monumental stone, 

This record of thy worth thy Friend inscribes. — Coleridge. 



Lloyd H. Herring was born in Chariton County, Missouri, in 1848, where he has 
lived ever since. His parents were pioneers of this country, having moved there from 
Maryland in an early day. He was educated at the private schools at Brunswick and 
at Illinois College, Jacksonville, Illinois. He united with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, in 1886. He was for several years Treasurer of the Church Extension 
Fund, and at present is Treasurer of the Conference Trust Fund of the Missouri 
Conference. He is making a special effort to build up this fund, and has now about 
$28,000.00 bearing interest, and something like that amount in wills, deeds to real 
estate, and notes payable at death of parties. Judge Herring was at one time a judge 
of the Chariton County Court, and always stood well in the esteem of his fellow 
citizens. He has served as President of Chariton County Exchange Bank for many 
years, and enjoys the confidence of business men. Judge Herring has a most estimable 
family. A few summers ago he and his wife and daughter, Miss Corrine, made a 
tour of Europe. The family is a great help to our Church at Brunswick. 



290 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV JAMES A. MITCHELL. 



Bless the Lord, my soul, and forget not all his benefits. — David. 

His grandparents, Morris and Elizabeth Mitchell, moved from East Tennessee in 
pioneer days, about 1835. They were Methodists, true and tried. His grandfather 
was a local preacher. His father and mother, Jesse and Providence Mitchell, came a 
little later and settled in Polk County, near Morrisville, Missouri. Morrisville College 
has been supported and patronized largely by the younger generations. His father was 
a Methodist preacher and was serving Stockton Circuit, Cedar County, Missouri, at 
the time of his death in 1854. He is the youngest of fifteen children, and was born 
June 24th, 1843. He was baptized in infancy and converted when nine years old. 
He worked on a farm in summer and attended school during winter. In his eleventh 
year his father died, and hence education was limited. Then the war between the 
states broke on his young life. He, with three older brothers, numerous relations, and 
many comrades, cast their lot with what proved to be the Lost Cause. Somehow, down 
in his heart, he hopes that all was not lost. The bright, patriotic lives that went down 
on both sides surely were not sacrificed for naught; some where, some way, some day, 
we shall understand. He lost a limb at Corinth in 1862, and he passed through the 
Blackwater and Vicksburg engagements a cripple. He returned to Missouri in Sep- 
tember, 1863, and entered active business life. Soon the Church of his father and 
mother and his God took him up, and he was a layman in the Church until 1891. His 
Presiding Elder, Rev. E. K. Miller, D.D., at the death of his pastor. Rev. M. R. Jones, 
that good man, put him in charge of the home circuit, Renick, Missouri. He served 
until the Quarterly meeting without license, except the command of Dr. Miller. Then 
he was licensed, recommended and admitted on trial, and made pastor of Durham and 
Maywood Circuit, three years. Since then he served Monroe City Circuit, two years; 
then Humphreys Circuit, three years; Chillicothe Circuit, one year; Mt. Olive Circuit, 
three years; Norborne Circuit, two years, and DeWitt Circuit, two years. The Con- 
ference has been good to him, he says; God is, and always has been good to him. His 
loving kindness and providence has been lavishly bestowed upon him, he writes. He 
loves the Church and his brother man, but he loves his Lord and His work best of all. 
He has witnessed many happy conversions, and not only ministered to, but has been 
ministered unto, by the Church of God. Brother Mitchell was devoted to his wife, 
who departed this life some years ago. His children are Professor Percy Norwood 
Mitchell, Miss Edna Mitchell and Miss Willie May Mitchell. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



REV JAMES WILLIAM RAMSEY. 



291 



By study men ascend to learning's Temple; by industry and 
Labor men rise to wealth; but it is by prayer that men ascend to 
God. — Dr. William E. Munsey. 



Rev. James William Ramsey 

is the son of Joseph Ramsey and 

Julia Ann Ramsey, both of 

whom were members of the 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 

South. He was born June 20th, 

1846, in Monroe County, West 

Virginia. He was converted in 

West Virginia at a church called 

Chestnut Grove, in January, 

1867, under the ministry of Rev. 

George Warner, and joined the 

Church at that time. He had 

always loved the Church, always 

read God's word, always been 

prayerful, hence his conviction 

was not so deep as some, yet he 

was most happily and soundly 

converted. He has had rather 

an even life, religiously; his 

growth in grace has been very 

gradual, and he is still learn- 
ing of the deep things of God. 

He was licensed to preach in 

August, 1868, by a Quarterly 

Conference of the West Virginia 

Conference; Rev. George War- 
ner, preacher in charge, and 

Rev. W. M. Dountain, Presiding 

Elder; the same Quarterly Con- 
ference recommended him to the 

Annual Conference for admis- 
sion on trial. He was received 

into the Annual Conference in 

1873; Rev. Steven K. Vaught, 

Presiding Elder, and Bishop E. 
M. Marvin, presiding. He was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop W 

M. Wightman, September 19th, 1875, at Guyandott, West Virginia; ordained Elder oy 
Bishop J. C. Keener, September 22nd, 1877, at Parkersburg, West Virginia. Brother 
Ramsey has served the following appointments : Wayne Circuit, two years ; Hurricane 
Bridge Circuit, three years; Barboursville Circuit, two years; Guyandott Station, three 
years; Salisbury Circuit, one year; Missouri Conference, Richmond Station, two years; 
Clarksville Circuit, three years; Sturgeon Circuit, three years; Salisbury Station, four 
years; Shelbina Circuit, two years; St. Charles Station, two years; Fulton Circuit, 
four years; Auxvasse Circuit, two years; his present charge is Triplett Circuit. He 
thinks that not less than one thousand and twenty persons have been converted and 
received into the Church under his ministry. Under his pastorate, one church in West 
Virginia and one in Missouri, was built, and he has paid off many debts on churches 
and parsonages also. He received his education in the public schools. He was married 
to Miss Annie E. Brawley, September 3rd, 1878, and they have the followng named 
children: W. M. Ramsey, Stella B. Ramsey, H. B. Ramsey and T. D. Ramsey. Brother 
Ramsey is now in the 34th year as a traveling preacher, and has never missed a roll 
call; he has taken his work and has done the best he could. 




292 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV NORMAN FRANCIS JOHNSON. 



The food of hope is meditated Action. — Wordsivorth. 



Rev. Norman Francis Johnson, son of F, M. Johnson and S. E. Johnson, was born 
November 28th, 1874, in Marion County, Missouri. Both parents were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted in the fall of 1886 at Hebron 
Church on the May wood Circuit, under the ministry of Rev. J. S. Rooker, and joined 
the Church the same day. There was no special demonstration about his conversion; 
he had been reared by God-fearing parents, and it was the most natural thing for him 
to become religious. As his knowledge of God and man increases, so his desire to do 
more for God and man has increased. He was licensed to preach by the Quarterly 
Conference of the Maywood Circuit in the spring of 1900; Rev. E. K. Miller D.D., 
Presiding Elder; recommended to the Annual Conference by the Hannibal District in 
the spring of 1902; Rev. E. K. Miller, D.D., Presiding Elder; received into the Annual 
Conference on trial in September, 1902; Rev. E. K. Miller, D.D., Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop A. W Wilson, presiding; ordained Deacon by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, September 
4th, 1904, at Columbia, Missouri. Appointments filled: Philadelphia Circuit, 1902; 
Saverton Circuit, 1903; Humphrey's Circuit, 1904-1906. Sixty-eight persons have been 
received into the Church during his ministry. His education was received at Centenary 
Academy, Palmyra, Missouri, from which he graduated, and at the Union Business 
College at Quincy, Illinois. He was married to Miss Carrie Whaley, December 19th, 
1898. The time when he entered the ministry has been possibly the most important 
crisis in his life. Dr. Tillett's "Personal Salvation" has been one of the books, aside 
from the Bible, that has proven beneficial in his Christian life. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



293 




REV WILLIAM OLIVER GRAFTON POTTER. 



A true Man is called to a state of war; go into the battle 
Undismayed; do your best and trust God. — Bishop Candler. 



Rev. William Oliver Grafton Potter was born May 9th, 1877, two miles East of 
Turney, in Clinton County, Missouri. He is a son of William H. Potter and Mary 
Potter, both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted 
New Year's eve of 1896, at Turney, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. J. M. Sitton, 
and united with the Church at the place he was converted, at the age of eighteen 
years. He was truly converted to our Lord Jesus Christ, as the fruits of his life 
clearly indicate. Brother Potter has made substantial growth in grace. His spirit 
of self-denial is known to his people and his life is filled with good works. He was 
licensed to preach, March 28th, 1901, by the Plattsburg District Conference held at Mis- 
souri City; Rev. T. G. Petree, pastor, and Rev. C. Grimes, Presiding Elder. He was 
recommended to the Annual Conference by the Chillicothe District Conference held at 
Brunswick, Missouri, April 9th. 1903; and was received into the Annual Conference 
on trial, September 2nd, 1903; Rev. M. L. Gray, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Charles 
P.. Galloway, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Eugene R. Hendrix, 
September 3rd, 1905, at Palmyra, Missouri. He has served the following appoint- 
ments: Green Castle Circuit, as supply from February 15th, 1903, to the close of 
that Conference year; Braymer Circuit. 1903-1904; Mr. Olive Circuit, 1904-1906; 
Bogard is his present work. About one hundred persons have been received into the 
Church under his ministry. The Mt. Olive Church was built under his pastorate at a 
cost of $3,500.00. His education was received in the public schools, Woodson Institute, 
at Richmond, Missouri, and Central College. He was married to Miss Myrtle M. Moore, 
November 18th, 1903, and they have one boy, W. Stanley Potter. Brother Potter is a 
friend to Christian education, and is heart and soul in the movement for a larger 
Central College at Fayette, Missouri. 



294 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




MR. AND MRS. TUNNELL. 

Brother Tunnel! is a Bank President, and after their church in the country near 
Osgood, Missouri, had been burned, he and his wife and neighbors worshipped in a school 
house. They are seated on the school house steps, and without a church home. 




BAIRDSTOWN CHURCH. 

This is an old-fashioned winter Quarterly meeting at Bairdstown, Sullivan County, 
Missouri. The people have come in sleds, and they are as happy as kings. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— CHILLICOTHE DISTRICT. 



295 



BROTHER E. GRANDISON STONE. 



Christian piety is itself a kind of holy development, enlarging 
Every way the soul's dimensions. — Bishop Atkins. 



By Rev Bowman D. Sipple. 



k 









E. Grandison Stone was born 
near Gooch's Millis Cooper 
County, Missouri, July 4th, 
1825, and died in Carroll Coun- 
ty, Missouri, March 26th, 1904. 
His parents were poor and hard- 
ships were common. It was at 
a Methodist camp meeting that 
Mr. Stone was converged at the 
age of fourteen. At the same 
place a timid, slender girl by 
the name of Miss Mary A. 
Campbell was converted. She 
became his wife December 21st, 
1848. With his young wife Mr. 
Stone crossed the river and en- 
tered land in Carroll County, 
where for more than fifty years 
they lived and wrought. From 
the beginning there was a pro- 
found conviction with each that 
the Church of Christ was 
worthy the best service of life. 
The cabin far out on the prairie 
soon became frequented by the 
minister, a church was built by 
a large contribution from Mr. 
Stone, and dedicated free of 
debt after he had made several 
additional gifts. Some pastor 
directed the attention of Mr. 
Stone to Christian education. A 
reader of the St. Louis Advo- 
cate, established in 1852, he be- 
came conversant with the move- 
ment for the establishment of 
Central College, begun about the 
same time. How much he gave 
to this work no one knows. It is a fact that a few weeks before the death ot Bishop 
Marvin he was secured to dedicate Mary's Chapel, near his home, and named tor his 
wife, and during this visit Mr. and Mrs. Stone made their will, giving one-third ot their 
property, consisting of two hundred and forty acres of land, to Central College. From 
this time on his contributions to education were frequent, and ever increasing. Gilts 
were made to Humphreys and Richmond Academies, Central Female College, Howard- 
Payne College and Central College. In 1901 he decided to give to Central College on the 
annuity plan. As fast as his money at' interest was paid in he turned it over to the 
treasurer. In three years he thus disposed of about eight thousand dollars, tiis 
will was now changed to cover his remaining property, all of which except one thou- 
sand dollars was given to Central College. The last conference Mr. Stone attended 
witnessed a collection for the Soo Chow University. Mr. Stone heard the call and 
responded with deep emotion by giving five hundred dollars. So faithfully had he 
administered on his own estate that there was less than four thousand dollars to be 
disposed of by will. His wife died several years before his own departure. He atter- 
wards married Mrs. Frances Sproule, December 2, 1903, a woman in full sympathy 
with his noble work, and who gave to Howard Payne the part of the estate allowed her 
by the law of the state, to enlarge the endowment of a scholarship he had helped to 
establish. 




296 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




MRS. SARAH A. MILLS. 



Many daughters have done virtuously, but thou excellest them all. 

-Solomon. 



At seven o'clock on the morning of June 26th, 1906, there passed from this life 
to the home beyond a noble Christian woman. Mrs. Sarah A. Mills was born October 
28th, 1846, in Sullivan County, Missouri. She was the eldest child of Emanuel Clem. 
In 1868 she was married to James R. Mills, and about three years later moved to 
Livingston County. In 1886, two years after the death of her husband, she moved 
to Chillicothe, where she lived until her death. Mrs. Mills united with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, in early girlhood under the ministry of Rev. W E. Dockery, 
and was always a devout and earnest Christian. She had been connected with the Elm 
Street Methodist Church of Chillicothe for nearly twenty years, and she will be 
missed from her accustomed place in both the church service and the Sunday School, 
for she never became too old to attend Sunday School regularly. We miss her, but 
hope to meet again. Loved by all, she will be sadly missed by her friends and neigh- 
bors. She had striven hard to educate her children and deserves all praise for her noble 
efforts. She bore her last sickness with the Christian fortitude that characterized her 
whole life. She is survived by five children, three girls and two boys — Mrs. Mary 
Mills Triplett, of Milan, Missouri, who was with her when the end came; Mr. Claude 
B. Mills of the City National Bank of Muskogee, Indian Territory; Mrs. Bertha G. 
Smith, of Chillicothe; Mrs. Agnes M. Troeger, of Livingston County, and Mr. Earl E. 
Mills, of Chillicothe. She also leaves two sisters and two brothers, who live in different 
parts of the country. The funeral was held at the Elm Street Methodist Church by 
the pastor, Rev. Thomas W. Alton, and interment was in the Jones cemetery, three 
miles east of Chillicothe, Missouri. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 297 



JOHN WESLEY. 



THE POWER OF A GREAT PERSONALITY 

By Bishop E. R. Hendrix. 

Father Phelan, an able journalist, once wrote: "Let Rome beware of any man 
whose name is John. What a world of trouble have these Johns given us since the days 
of John Huss and John Wickliffe and John Knox and John Calvin and especially John 
Wesley!" The editor-priest was right. Each was a man sent from God. The name 
that waited the forerunner of Christ when he was born and which we call John in 
our English speech was really "Johanan," and means "Jehovah is gracious." Next 
to the gift of Christ himself God's greatest gifts to men have been men — some prophets, 
some apostles, some pastors and teachers. 

"They are indeed our pillar fires, 

Seen as we go; 
They are that city's shining spires 

We travel to." 

They illumine both earth and heaven. They can worship before no throne save 
the great white throne itself. Each life like these incarnates for us somewhat of the 
life of God. John Wesley, to whom All Saints' Day was a favorite day in the calendar 
(when he always preached on "The Communion of Saints"), was wont to say: "How 
superstitious are they who scruple giving God solemn thanks for the lives and deaths 
of his saints!" For the life and death of John Wesley himself the whole Christian 
world is giving thanks today. Even Rome gives thanks that he is dead, not thinking 
that after two centuries he is heard and revered by millions where he once had the 
ear of thousands — "the most apostolic man since the apostolic age," says Philip 
Schaff. 

It has been well said that the difference between great men and others is that there 
is more of them. "A man may be a microcosm, but a great man is a macrocosm," says 
Emerson. Wesley, like Angelo, was a "four-souled man." Michael Angelo was at once 
a painter, a sculptor, an architect, and a poet; nor did he ever lift his hand until he 
had steeped his inmost soul in prayer. Wesley was a preacher, preaching not less than 
forty thousand sermons; a traveler whose itinerary reached two hundred and twenty- 
five thousand miles (nearly ten times around the globe and almost as far as the moon) ; 
a writer whose publications of all sorts reached the amazing number of 371 ; and an 
ecclesiastical statesman whose power of organization was equal to that of the great 
Richelieu, whose genius for statesmanship had been the wonder of his times. It was 
no ordinary man who casts a shadow two hundred years long — a shadow which grows 
broader as it lengthens. Cowper's eulogy has long since become the world's estimate: 

The veteran warrior of the Christian field 

Who never saw the sword he could not wield. 
John Wesley was a born leader of men, with that mastery of himself and of all 
his powers which ever marks leaders of the first rank. From early life the charm of 
his personality won him friends and followers. His schoolmates at Charterhouse, in 
London, were won from their horseplay by his stories; and the Holy Club, at Oxford, 
though founded by Charles Wesley, recognized John Wesley as their only possible 
leader on his return as a fellow arid tutor. The book of scholarly notes preserved in 
the Bodleian showed how careful was his preparation for the Holy Club by this favorite 
tutor who, whether as a Greek scholar or as a dialectician, was easily recognized as a 
master workman. Only his great work as the foremost preacher of his day has eclipsed 
his work as the master linguist and logician of his college. 

Like Milton, Wesley was born with the consciousness of some great mission; and 
like the great Puritan noet, he sought to make his life a great epic to nrepare himself 
for the great epic which he was to p-ive to the world. Seeking advice from the wisest 
counselors, he asked for well-considered responses, saving: "Your views may be of 
consequence not only to all this province, but to generations of Christians not yet 
born." 



298 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MISSOURI CONFERFNCE. 




THE NEW METHODIST CHURCH AT SHELBINA. 
Rev. W. A. Hanna, Pastor. 



1 806— CENTENNIAL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 



MACON DISTRICT. 



Presiding Elder 
Macon Sta.. 
Shelbina Sta.. 
Supernumerary 
Memphis Sta. 
Kirksville Sta.. 
Brookfield Sta.. 
Clarence Ct.. 
Shelbina Ct. 
Paris Ct.. 
Marceline Sta.. 
Bucklin Ct.. 



.R. H. Cooper 

.R. Mcllvoy 

W A. Hanna 

W. M. Wainright 

... V. 0. White 

. C. N. Broadhurst 

W M. Alexander 

.J. W. Kimbrell 

W. 0. Medley 

W M. Pope 

.J. S. Smith 

.H. W Buckner 



Callao Ct.. 
Lakenan Ct.. 
Supernumerary 
Edina Ct.. 
La Plata Ct. . 
Brashear Ct. . 
Macon Ct.. 
Madison Ct.. 
Cairo Ct. . 
Downing Ct. . 
Queen City Ct. . 



W. T. May 

. T. B. Farry 

.J. R. Kincaid 

. C. S. Rennison 

W- Rutherford 

.G. T. Ralston 

J. D. F. Houck 

W. S. Rooker 

.C. A. Bowles 

To be supplied 

To be supplied 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 



299 



REV RICE HARRIS COOPER. 



There is no higher function which a human soul may take upon 
Itself than this: To make men see and love God. 

— Hamilton Wright Mabie. 

By Rev. T. H. B. Anderson, D. D. 
He is the son of Rev. L. W. 
and Hester A. Vaughan Cooper, 
born in Nicholasville, Ken- 
tucky, June 18, 1848. With his 
parents he emigrated to Mis- 
souri in 1854, and was educated 
in the Gallatin Seminary and 
Central College. Dedicated to 
God in infancy, converted at the 
age of twelve; two years later 
he joined the Church, and in 
July, 1871, was licensed to 
preach. Being the only son it 
was the dearest wish of his 
parents that he might be a 
preacher of the gospel. For 
this they prayed. He joined the 
Missouri Conference at Mexico, 
September, 1872, and without 
interruption has given six years 
to Circuits, nine to Stations, and 
twenty to Districts. 

On Circuits and Stations he 
was careful and painstaking — 
what we call a good pastor. At 
the same time an excellent 
student, a habit he still 
possesses. Schaff, F. W- Rob- 
ertson and John Watson, are 
among his favorite authors. 
His expression of faith is his 
own. Cant, set phrases, so fre- 
quently heard, are not in his 
vocabulary. He is orthodox 
and his spirit conforms to his 
preaching. He had revivals in 
his early ministry, and after 
put in the Eldership did the 
work of an evangelist. "Concerning the collections" he has rare talent. Give him 
time and things come to pass. His District work stands as his monument. 

He is a vigorous, thoughtful and entertaining preacher, delighting his auditors; 
he sets the truth logically in their minds and they go away to ponder it. Socially is 
most companionable, quaint, sharp, good at repartee, but leaves no string. He has 
a word of anecdote, and is fond of giving them to his friends. Withal he is a sober, 
serious man, far removed from levity or light mindedness. Life to him is not a garden 
of roses, but conflict with foes visible and invisible. He feels keenly the responsibility 
of his position. His scholastic attainments are above mediocracy; he knows the 
Bible, Methodist Theology, English literature, Economics, History, and the best 
thought of the modern mind. His acquirements, like disciplined soldiers, go and 
come at his bidding. 

Measured by all rules he is one of the strongest men of the Missouri Conference, 
and has years of service ahead. He is now Presiding Elder of the Macon District, 
Curator of Central College for Women, President of the Missouri Conference Trust 
Fund, and President of the Joint Commission of Federation of North Missouri. He 
has diplomatic ability, and gets as a rule what he goes after. His judgment of men 
and measures is good. Had he turned his attention to business he would have suc- 
ceeded admirably. 

Recently his wife and companion went away to Heaven. The loss to him and 
family was great, as she was a most estimable lady. Brother Cooper has borne his 
affliction with heroic fortitude, reveres her memory, and looks forward hopefully to 
sweet reunion over there. Mrs. R. H. Cooper had a host of friends who cherish her 
memory. 




300 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV- C. N. BROADHURST. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 301 



REV CYRUS N. BROADHURST. 



Thou has not withheld from God the gladness and the service of 
Thine heart, and He will not withhold from thee the music and 
The rapture and the abundance of harvest. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



By Rev. T. H. B. Anderson, D.D. 

Here is a man of conviction — a man with purpose of heart. He loves his state and 
stands for the best — the Sabbath, the closed saloon, honest politics, "the square deal." 
He does not believe that short cuts in business or statecraft win on the long run. 
It is the long run that he is for. Better go down in defeat and be right than to triumph 
and be with evil doers. The defeated man, who is right, can look with a level eye *into 
the face of God, angels and men. 

His congregations gain, prayer meetings increase, League work takes on new life — 
in a word, everything lives where Broadhurst labors. He has life an himself, and ability 
to inspirit others. Men instinctively, when they meet him, want to do something; they 
see that he is a busy man. He works intelligently, systematically, religiously. "Col- 
lections full," and invariably conversions and accessions are reported. Our subject has 
fire; the breath of God is in his sermons. He reaches conscience; men believe and 
live. 

First — His sermons are forceful, and often elegantly expressed. He reads the 
best books, and knows the history of his own Church, as well as that of others. 
The writer heard him once. The sermon sparkled with both wit and spiritual power. 
His fraternal address to the Missouri Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
was read with delight by hundreds. 

Second — Altogether, our Brother Broadhurst is a clever man. He is beloved by his 
brethren; if he has an enemy, it is not known. He is, as the reader can see, pastor of 
the church at Kirksville, and in his fourth year. Others report progress under his 
faithful labors. 



302 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV JACKSON PARASADE NOLAN, A.M., D.D. 



Our best moral wealth is chiefly legacy — the example of great and 
Good men. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. Jackson Parasade Nolan was born January 26th, 1830, in Morgan County, 
Georgia. He was converted September 3rd, 1847, and joined the Church at Phila- 
delphia. His conversion was particularly bright and happy, and he has had continual 
growth along the line of deeper prayer and the study of God's word. He was licensed 
to preach by the Quarterly Conference of Centenary Church, St. Louis, Missouri, in 
July, 1852. He was recommended to the Annual Conference for admission on trial 
by the same Quarterly Conference in August, 1852, and was received into the Annual 
Conference in 1852; Rev. Wesley Browning, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Andrew, 
presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Kavanaugh in September, 1854; was 
ordained Elder by Bishop Pierce in September, 1856. He filled the following appoint- 
ments: St. Louis, Arrow Rock, St. Charles College, Agent for American Bible Society, 
and from 1871 to 1888 Presiding Elder work. He attended Emory College and was 
given the degrees of A.M. and D.D., by said College. He spent ten years of his life 
in educational work of the Church, and was connected with the Shelbyville High School, 
St. Charles College, Gallatin, Bloomington and Macon High Schools. He was married 
to Miss Elizabeth Catick at St. Louis, Missouri, in 1856, and they had four children — 
Lucius Paul Nolan, Mrs. Georgia Mary Cadogan (nee Nolan), Miss Maud Eugenia 
Nolan and Blanche Elizabeth Nolan. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 



303 




REV WILLIAM WARREN. 



When he came to the Methodist Itinerant Ministry, it was like 
Coming home. — Dr. D. R. McAnally. 

Rev. William Warren was born in Old England, February 28th, 1820. His par- 
ents, Thomas Warren and Martha Warren, were members of the Wesleyan Methodist 
Church. He was converted in 1835, in Salisbury, Old England, in a revival in the 
Wesleyan Methodist Church, and joined that Church at the same time. His conversion 
came after several days of deep penitence. After his conversion he found that it was 
his duty to preach and to do all the good he could to his fellowmen. He was licensed to 
preach by the Quarterly Conference of the Salisbury Circuit, Old England. He was 
recommended to the Missouri Annual Conference by the Quarterly Conference of the 
Gallatin Circuit, in 1851; he was received into the Annual Conference that year at 
Fayette, Missouri; Rev. Benjamin Ashby, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Capers, presid- 
ing. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Andrew, at Palmyra, Missouri, in 1853; he 
was ordained Elder by Bishop Early at Richmond, Missouri, in 1855. He served the 
following charges: Gallatin, 1851-1852; Athens, 1852-1853; Maysville, 1853-1855 
Yellow Creek, 1855-1856; Bloomington, 1856-1858; Keytesville, 1858-1860; Linneus 
1860-1861; Kirksville, 1861-1863; Macon City, 1863-1864; Supernumerary, 1864-1867 
Linneus, 1867-1868; Paris, 1868-1870; Florida, 1870-1871; Pleasant Grove, 1871-1872 
Cedar City, 1872-1873; Linneus, 1873-1874; Clarence, 1874-1875; Sioux City, 1875-1877 
Bucklin, 1877-1878; Renick, 1878-1881; Franklin, 1881-1882; Roanoke, 1882-1884 
Bedford and Tina, 1884-1885; superannuated, 1885-1886; Bloomington, 1886-1887 
Westville, 1887-1888; superannuated, 1888-1890. Brother Warren was twice married 
first to Miss Mary Young, and the second time to Miss Maria Butts, April 15th, 1846 
The following are the names of his children: William R. Warren, George J. Warren 
Thomas H. Warren, Joshua B. Warren, Millisant J. Warren, Benjamin F. Warren 
Sarah M. Warren, Alfred P. Warren and Julia M. Warren. Brother Warren went 
several years ago to his reward in Heaven. 



304 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV. WALTER TOOLE. 



The God of hope fills us with all joy and peace in believing, 
That we may abound in hope, in the power of the Holy Spirit. 

— Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. Walter Toole was born in Shelby County, Kentucky, in 1820. He was a 
son of Daniel Toole and Elizabeth Toole. He was converted in 1841, in Platte County, 
Missouri, during a Cumberland Presbyterian Camp Meeting. He had been previously 
awakened at a Methodist Camp Meeting in the same county and joined the Church at 
Weston, under the ministry of Rev. W. G. Caples. He had always had a strong 
desire to do good and lead souls to Christ, which he always regarded as an evidence 
of his call to preach the Gospel. He was licensed to preach by the Quarterly Con- 
ference of the Weston Circuit; Rev. W. W. Redman, Presiding Elder. The same 
Quarterly Conference recommended him to the Annual Conference, into which he 
was received in the year 1844; Rev. W. W. Redman, Presiding Elder. He was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop Paine, at Hannibal, Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop 
Andrew at Weston, Missouri. He served the following appointments: Big Creek, 
Richmond, Bloomington, Edina, Alexander, Hydesburg, Keytesville. Columbia, Monti- 
cello, Bloomington. Richmond, Bloomington District, Macon Circuit, Paris, Clarence, 
New Florence, Salisbury, Sturgeon, Clarence. Sue City Hunnewell, Shelbyville, Madi- 
son, New Franklin, Roanoke, Clarence, Bucklin, Sue City. He obtained his education 
at the public schools and at St. Charles Academv. He was married to Miss Virginia 
H. E. Lyell, September 3rd, 18F0, and the following named children were born to 
them: Ann Toole, Mary Toole. Virginia F. Toole, Oswald Toole, Edwin Toole. Julia 
E. Toole, Martha E. Toole, Walter Toole, Lula Toole, Wesley Toole and William 
Marvin Toole. Brother Toole was a noble, good man. He died in Macon City, No- 
vember 7th, 1895 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 



305 



REV. SAMUEL KENDALL FOWLER. 



Before the door of each and all a slumber place is ready set and 
The graves in number grow from day to day. — From the 
Ancient Arabic. 



By Mrs. John Holland. 

Rev. Samuel Kendall Fowler 
was born in Brown County, 
Ohio, February 9th, 1809. His 
parents were Methodists of the 
old type. He was converted in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was 
engaged in the dry goods busi- 
ness. His conversion was bright 
and clear and he never for one 
moment doubted his acceptance 
with God and his own change of 
heart and life. His growth in 
grace was very marked and de- 
cided. Sometimes his joy was 
unrestrained, and he would give 
vent to his feelings by a glorious 
shout of victory — never boister- 
ous, but a soft clapping of the 
hands and an expression, "Glory 
to God." He had always that 
sweet peace that flowed like a 
river, and as old age came on he 
was more mellow and sweet spir- 
ited. He was licensed to preach 
in 1847. He moved from Ohio 
to Iowa in 1850, and joined the 
Conference there. He joined the 
Missouri Conference in 1856, and 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop 
Doggett, and Elder by Bishop 
Pierce. He served the following 
appointments : Florida, Lin- 
neus, Lancaster, Auburn, Ash- 
ley, Edina, Millville, Warrenton, 
Memphis and Queen City. He 
was a great revivalist and was 
wonderfully successful in win- 
ning souls. He was a sweet 
singer and often touched hearts by his gospel songs. He attended school at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and was quite a successful teacher in his day. He was married to Miss Mary 
E. Hart in June, 1850, and the following named children were born to them: Rachel 
Elinor Fowler, James Jackson Fowler, Samuel Kendall Fowler, Taylor Greenfield 
Fowler, David Thorp Fowler, Sarah Elizabeth Fowler, Evaline Louellen Fowler, 
Carrie Sophia Fowler, Edwin Warren Fowler, Harriett Emma Fowler, Charles Walter 
Fowler, Ella Etta Fowler and Minnie Belle Fowler. The Lives of the Wesleys, 
Fletcher, Caples, Marvin and others are books that greatly helped him. He was a 
tall, handsome man, very happy-hearted, and numbered his friends by his acquaintances. 
He had a gracious, cordial manner and never passed any one he knew without a pleas- 
ant word and a wish that they were well. In his family he was a real model; the 
kindest and most helpful husband, and the best of fathers. His Bible, the St. Louis 
Christian Advocate and his glasses were always on his table, and every spare- moment 
found him reading, for he was a student always. His was a most beautiful life, and 
his death was triumphant and glorious. 







306 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV WILLIAM McKENDREE WAINRIGHT. 



Christianity as Christ taught is the truest Philosophy of Life 
Ever spoken. — Drummond. 



William McKendree Wainright, son of Rev. Daniel T. Wainright and Amanda F. 
Wainright, was born July 10th, 1850, at Monticello, Missouri. Both parents were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted in 1859, at 
Monticello, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. M. R. Jones, and joined the Church 
that year at the same place. In 1869 he made a full consecration of himself to God and 
began a preparation for the work of the ministry, to which he felt he had been called. 
He was licensed to preach in February, 1872, at Shelbyville, Missouri, Rev. B. H. 
Spencer being the preacher in charge and Rev. W W McMurry, Presiding Elder. 
He was recommended to the Annual Conference for admission on trial by the Quarterly 
Conference of Monticello, Missouri, and was received into the Annual Conference on 
trial in 1872 at Mexico, Missouri; Rev. W. W. McMurry, Presiding Elder, and Bishop 
George F. Pierce, presiding; ordained Deacon in September, 1874, by Bishop J. C. Keener, 
at St. Joseph, Mo.; ordained Elder by Bishop H. N. McTyeire in September, 1876, at 
Hannibal, Missouri. Appointments filled are: Lineville, Iowa, 1872-1873; Trenton, 
Missouri, 1874; Albany, Missouri, 1875-1876; Clarence, Missouri, 1877-1879; Super- 
numerary, 1880-1881; Labelle, Missouri, 1882; Millville, Missouri, 1883-1884; Osborne, 
Missouri, 1885; Athens, Texas, 1886-1887; Carthage, Missouri, 1891-1893; Clinton, 
Missouri, 1895. On account of throat trouble, he has been compelled to give up regular 
work and has been supernumerary since 1896. During the years of his ministry more 
than twelve hundred persons have been received into the Church. He built the par- 
sonage at Albany and Clarence, Missouri, and one at Athens, Texas. He obtained 
his education at Monticello Seminary, Shelbyville High School and Central College. He 
was married to Miss Mary J. Turner, September 3rd, 1874, and they have the following 
named children: Mary Lillian, Mabel, William Dimmitt, Daisy (who is now dead), 
Charles Earl and Thomas Leon. Wesley's Journals and Life, Fletcher's Works, 
Asbury's Journal, Taylor's "Holy Living," and Life of Finney, have been some of the 
books that have been very beneficial to him in his Christian life. He very strongly 
endorses the Christian College as a means of training the higher and better nature 
of the young men and women of to-day. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 



307 



REV JAMES SAMUEL SMITH. 



Nitor in adversum; nee me, qui caetera, vincit 
Impetus; et rapido contrarius everhor orbi. — Ovid. 

I steer against their motions, nor am I 
Borne back by all the current of the sky.- 



- Addison. 



Rev. James Samuel Smith, son 
of Judge J. D. Smith and Ruth 
A. (McPherson) Smith, was 
born in Macon County, Missouri, 
May 4th, 1841. Both of his par- 
ents were members of the Meth- 
odist Church, South. He was 
converted at a camp meeting not 
far from where Macon City, 
Missouri, is now located, in 1855, 
under the ministry of Rev. A. 
P. Linn, and joined the Church 
then and there. He, together 
with a brother and sister, who 
were converted at the same time, 
went into the church together. 
His conversion was so very clear 
and satisfactory that it made a 
lasting impression on his mind. 
Today his faith is abiding, and 
his delight in the Lord is his 
chief joy. He was licensed to 
preach by the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Macon Circuit in 1860; 
Rev. W E. Dockery was the 
preacher in charge, and Rev. 
Walter Toole, Presiding Elder. 
He was received into the Annual 
Conference on trial in 1861, at 
Glasgow, Missouri, Rev. William 
G. Caples presiding in the ab- 
sence of the Bishop. He was 
sent as a junior preacher with 
Rev. Andrew Monroe to Fayette 
Circuit. During that year he 
was sent to Sturgeon, Rev. 
George Sexton having gone into 
the army. He was elected Dea- 
con at Fulton, Missouri, in 1863, Rev. Andrew Monroe presiding, but was not ordamed 
until 1866 by Bishop Doggett, at Richmond, Missouri. He was also ordained elder 
by Bishop Doggett in 1866, at Richmond. He served Fayette Circuit and Sturgeon 
in 1861-1862, Rocheport Circuit, Columbia Station, preached two years in Canada, St. 
Charles Station, Louisiana Station, Glasgow Circuit, and attended Pritchett Institute, 
Nebraska City Station. In the fall of 1870 he was made Presiding Elder of Nebraska 
District. In 1871, Paris; Canton, Monticello, Memphis, Monticello Seminary, Marvin 
College in Kansas, Dallas Female College, Presiding Elder of Dallas District, Mexico, 
Weston Circuit, Lawson and Lathrop, Liberty Circuit, Chillicothe, Linneus Circuit, 
Palmyra Circuit, Montgomery, Atchison and Marceline. The schools he attended were 
the Bloomington High School, under Rev. 0. R. Bouton of New York, and Pritchett 
Institute, under Dr. Carr Pritchett. He has been president of three Church Schools, 
a member of the bar, and was Presiding Elder before he was thirty years old. He 
held one Quarterly Conference with no one present but the pastor, and one where 
there was no one but the steward, and he resigned and they elected his successor. 
He was married April 6th, 1871, to Susan J. Cain, a daughter of the Rev. W- R. Cam. 
His children are Mabel, Mary Bettie (now dead), George A. Smith, Mrs. Nancy 
Boulware and James Bourland Smith. 




308 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV. WILLIAM THOMAS READY. 



The validity of human testimony lies at the foundation of all our 
Knowledge, and enters into the substance of our life. — Bishop 

Wilson. 



Rev. William Thomas Ready, son of William H. Ready and Catherine H. Ready, 
was born at Carlisle, Indiana, October 13th, 1855. He was converted and joined the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at Long Creek, Illinois, when twelve years of age, 
under the ministry of Rev. W. D. Weems. He was reclaimed in the winter of 1877, 
under the ministry of Rev. Reynolds, at LaPlace, Illinois. At every stage of his 
Christian experience, his happiness seemed to be complete, but there have been several 
marked epochs in life when he took a forward leap and his joy and knowledge of the love 
of God have been greatly increased. He was licensed to preach December 15th, 1879, 
by the Nebraska City Quarterly Conference; Rev. Charles A. Shearman, preacher in 
charge, and Rev. H. D. Hogan, Presiding Elder. He was recommended to the Annual 
Conference for admission on trial by the Oskaloosa Circuit, Western Conference, in 
August, 1880; was received into the Western Conference in August, 1880; 
Rev. H. D. Hogan, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Keener, presiding; ordained 
Deacon by Bishop Granbery, at Wyandotte, Kansas, in August, 1883; ordained 
Elder by Bishop Granbery at Wyandotte, Kansas, in August, 1885. He has served 
the following appointments: Western Conference, Oskaloosa Circuit, as supply; Rock 
Bluff Circuit, two years; Rulo Circuit, one year; Bronson and Center, two years; 
Spring Hill, one year; transferred to White River Conference, and served Paragould 
Station, one year; was sent to Portia on account of health, one year; 1889, transferred 
to Missouri Conference, and served Prairieville, three years; Auxvasse, one year; 
Edina, two years; Warrenton, one year; O'Fallen and Wentzville, two years; Mound 
City, one year; 1899, transferred to Oklahoma Conference. About two thousand per- 
sons have been received into the Church under his ministry. The following churches 
and parsonages have been built under his pastorate: One at Rulo, Nebraska; one at 
Centre, near Fort Scott, Kansas; now building church at Tecumseh Station, Oklahoma 
Conference; parsonage at Bronson, Kansas. He received his education at Long Creek 
High School, in Macon County, Illinois, and St. Mary's College, at Nebraska City; 
studied Greek and Latin privately and graduated in Chautauqua Course. He was 
married to Miss Lillie D. McCallum, May 8th, 1884, and they have the following chil- 
dren: L. Frances Ready, Panthea A. Ready, Catherine Ready, Opal Ready, Velma 
Ready. They have four children dead. Some of the books which have proven very 
helpful to him, aside from the Bible, have been "Pilgrim's Progress," "Baxter's Saints' 
Rest," and the works of our leading evangelists. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 



309 



REV WILLIAM M. WOOD. 



The Christian lives to Christ alone, 

To Christ alone he dies. — Charles Wesley. 



By Rev. Robert McIlvoy. 
Rev. William M. Wood, son 
of John Wood and Jane Wood, 
whose maiden name was Jane 
Parker. They were both Meth- 
odists. Rev. William M. Wood 
was born in Monroe County, 
Virginia, in 1825. He was con- 
verted and joined the Church 
at Milton, Randolph County, 
Missouri, in 1848, under the 
ministry of Rev. Jesse Green. 
He and his brother Elisha (now 
an aged resident of Clarence, 
Missouri, April, 1907) had 
agreed together several months 
previous, that when the preacher 
should come and hold a meeting, 
they would seek salvation. But 
their sense of sin was not deep 
until they knelt at the altar, 
where the Lord revealed unto 
them their real state. William 
wanted to be converted and 
shout all over the house, while 
Elisha desired that he might re- 
ceive the quiet assurance of his 
pardon and make no noise about 
it. One who was present says : 
"When William was converted, 
he just sat still and rejoiced in 
his soul without any noise, but 
Elisha shouted all around the 
house and upset the stove." 
Thus we see God's way and 
man's way are not always the 
same. His call to preach marked 
also a deepening of his spiritual 
life. This was about twelve 
months after his conversion. He was teaching school in Lewis County, and when the 
call came he became so dazed and overwhelmed that for the time he lost sight of his 
school duties. During the several days that followed, when he would undertake to 
read the Scriptures before his school, he would be so moved that he would have to cease 
reading and rejoice in the Lord. He was licensed to preach and recommended to the 
Annual Conference by the Quarterly Conference of the Monticello Circuit, Rev. E. M. 
Marvin, pastor, and Rev. Horace Brown, Presiding Elder, in 1849, and was received 
at the following session of the Missouri Conference; Bishop Capers, presiding. Brother 
Wood was married in 1853 to Miss Mary E. Wright. Sister Wood lives at Macon and 
will be seventy-four if she lives till August 27th, 1907. She is a bright, active 
Christian woman and will be missed when God takes her. The names of their chil- 
dren: Marvin Capers Wood, Mary Belle, Martha Josephine, William Wright Wood, 
Larena Susan Wood, Margaret Elizabeth Wood, Cora Amanda Wood, Stuart Monroe 
Wood, Rebecca Eleanor Wood. Possibly the most important crisis in his life was 
when he fully consecrated his life to the work of the ministry. He died while Pre- 
siding Elder of the Gallatin District, at Oxford, Worth County, Missouri, February 
17th, 1878. At the time he was taken sick he was engaged in a revival effort. Ex- 
posure brought on pneumonia, from which he died after twenty-two days. His family 
lived at Bloomington, Macon County, Missouri, and did not receive word of his sickness 
until a few days before he died. His wife reached Oxford the day after the end came. 
Thus separated from those he loved, this servant of God passed to his reward. But it 
is hoped that father, mother, sons and daughters shall some day be reunited in the 
presence of Him in whose service Brother Wood proved faithful to the end. 




310 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- COVERDALE SMITH RENNISON, A.B. 

Operarius qui non erubescat, et qui recte sermonem veritatis 
Secet.— St. Paid. 

A workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the 
Word of Truth. 






Coverdale Smith Rennison, 
son of James Rennison and An- 
nie W. Rennison, was born June 
3rd, 1870, at Threlkeld, Cumber- 
land County, England. His 
father was a local preacher in 
the Wesleyan Methodist Church, 
and also a Home Missionary in 
connection with an undenomina- 
tional county's mission. His 
mother was also a Wesleyan 
Methodist. He was converted at 
a decision meeting, one of a 
series, held in connection with 
the Sunday School every month. 
Soon afterwards, in March, 
1881, he was admitted on trial 
into the Wesleyan Methodist 
Church, and received into full 
membership in June, 1881, dur- 
ing the ministry of Rev. Thomas 
A. Sneed. The meeting was one 
at which the usual lessons were 
dispensed with, and addresses 
were delivered by the teachers 
and others, urging present de- 
cision for Christ, after which 
opportunity was given for seek- 
ing salvation. At one of these 
meetings, he went into the in- 
quiry room, and there he felt 
that God spoke to him a word 
of peace. He has now a deeper 
understanding of the things of 
God, and a more intense and 
helpful consciousness of His 
presence, than he did when con- 
verted, a stronger will to do 
good and a more perfect love. He has been largely helped thereto by home influences 
and memories, by several vists to the Keswick Convention, by being under Rev. Thomas 
Champness in the Joyful News Mission, by the influences of Central College, and by 
many godly people in the various charges he has served. He was admitted on trial as 
a local preacher in the Dawnham Market Circuit, Norfolk County, England, at the 
December Quarterly meeting, 1890, and became a fully accredited local preacher in 
the same Circuit in December, 1891; Rev. C. Bingant, Superintendent Minister. He 
supplied the Holcomb Circuit, Popular Bluff District, in Dunklin County, Missouri, in 
1894-1895, as junior preacher; Rev. 0. G. Halliburton, Presiding Elder. He was rec- 
ommended to the Annual Conference for admission on trial by the Poplar Bluff District 
Conference, May 8th, 1895, and was received into the St. Louis Annual Conference in 
1895 Rev. 0. G. Halliburton, Presiding Elder, and Bishop C. B. Galloway, presiding; 
ordained Deacon by Bishop Warren A. Candler at DeSoto, Missouri, September 25th, 
1898; ordained Elder by Bishop A. W. Wilson, at Chillicothe, Missouri, September 7th, 
1902. Appointments filled are: In England, as Joyful News Evangelist, 1892-1894; 
from October, 1893, to July, 1894, as Circuit Evangelist in Bradwell Circuit, County 
Derby; in United States as supply, Kennett Circuit, a part of the Holcomb Circuit, 
1894-1895; Piedmont Circuit, 1895-1896; St. James Circuit, 1896-1898; Student at 
Central College in 1898; transferred to Missouri Conference in 1899; Callao Circiut, 
1899-1900; Higbee Station, 1900-1901; Higbee and Cooper's Chapel, 1901-1902; Salis- 
bury Station, 1902-1904; Agency Circuit, 1904-1906; Edina Circuit, 1906. About one 
hundred and thirty persons have been received into the Church under his ministry. 
The church at Edina was built during his pastorate there. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 



311 










REV- WILLIAM MARVIN ALEXANDER, A.B. 



Faith puts Christ between itself and circumstances; so that it 
Cannot see them. — Dr. F. B. Meyer. 

Rev. William Marvin Alexander is the son of Rev. J. T. Alexander and Elizabeth 
A. Alexander; they both belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Kev. 
William Marvin Alexander was born in Trousdale County, Tennessee October 4th, 
1877. He was converted in March, 1893, at Augusta, Kansas, under the ministry ol 
Rev. C. W. Thorpe, and joined the Church at the same time and place. He had 
been going to the altar for more than a year before he was converted, but when con- 
version came, he was fully conscious of an instant change of heart. For a number 
of years his growth in grace was slow, but as he became conscious of his call to the 
ministry, there came a strong desire for a broader knowledge of God. The act ltseli 
of entering the ministry was probably the greatest crisis in his life. He was licensed 
to preach at Arkansas City, Kansas, in April, 1900, at the meeting of the Council 
Grove District Conference, Western Annual Conference; Rev. J. E. Owen, pastor, 
and Rev. T. C. Downs, Presiding Elder. He was recommended to the Missouri con- 
ference from the Macon District Conference held at Bucklin, Missouri, m 190d , and 
he was received into the Annual Conference at Mexico, Missouri, in 190o; Rev. V. a. 
Holliday, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Chas. B. Galloway, presiding; ordained Deacon 
by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, at Palmyra, Missouri, in 1905. 



312 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- HENRY WARREN BUCKNER. 



Christianity is love melted into Compassion. — Bishop Marvin. 



By Rev. A. B. Culbertson, A.M. 

Henry Warren Buckner is a 
native of Kentucky, born in Un- 
ion County, March 3rd, 1862. 
His parents, Presley Avery, and 
Henrietta Francis Buckner, were 
both members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. At 
the early age of ten years he 
knelt at the Church altar and 
there, in answer to prayer, re- 
ceived clear evidence cf sins for- 
given. His connection with the 
Church began at once and at 
this time came a distinct call to 
the ministry. The call was not 
heeded for some time, and not 
till after great leanness was 
sent to his soul. 

In the year 1889, by a series 
of sermons on the subject of 
"Full Consecration," he was led 
to commit his entire being to the 
will of his Master and ever since 
he has been drinking deeper at 
the fountain of God's wisdom 
and grace. He received his li- 
cense to preach from the Quar- 
terly Conference of Salem 
charge in the Louisville Confer- 
ence August 29th, 1891. At this 
time there was an urgent call 
from the Illinois Conference for 
men. By the advice of some of 
his friends he was led to accept 
work in that Conference as a 
supply on the Schuyler Circuit, 
Rev. 0. T. Rogers preacher in 
charge, and he junior preacher. 
By this Quarterly Conference he was recommended to the Illinois Conference for ad- 
mission on trial in the year 1892. Two years afterwards Bishop E. R. Hendrix or- 
dained him Deacon and he was ordained Elder by Bishop John C. Granbery, September 
11th, 1898. His educational training was received from a private school in Kentucky 
and normal schools in Illinois. While he has preached ever since receiving his license, 
his work as a regular pastor has been broken into. At times he has been engaged in 
teaching and in the employ of the American Bible Society. From the year 1896 his 
work has been wholly that of an itinerant Methodist preacher. God has greatly 
blessed his efforts. About two hundred persons have been received into the church. 
In the year 1903, Bishop Hendrix transferred him to the St. Louis Conference 
and from there he was transferred by Bishop Galloway to the Missouri Conference and 
appointed to the Prairie Hill Circuit. In 1906 he was stationed at Bucklin. Miss 
Bertha Wagner became his wife on the second of September, 1896. They have three 
children, Everett Cromwell, Gladys Henriett, and William Averv. "Bunyan's Pilgrim's 
Progress," the books in the four years' course, "Sunset Views," "In His Steps," "The 
Christian's Secret of a Happy Life," "Abide in Christ," "Stepping Heavenward," are 
some of the books that have been specially helpful to him. Here are his own words 
concerning the Christian College: "I am fully convinced that the hope of true 
success in the future, for both church and state, is closely connected with the Christian 
College." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 



313 



REV HENRY POPE BOND. 



To create man God had only to speak; to redeem him He had to 
Suffer. He made man by his breath; He saved him by His blood. 

— D. L. Moody. 



By Rev. T. H. B. Anderson, D.D. 

Our subject is a fertile one. His 
ancestral line runs back through Vir- 
ginia and Maryland. The best blood 
courses its way through his veins. 
"There is as much in the blood of men 
as there is in the blood of horses," said 
John Randolph, the sage and wit of 
Ronoake. No man can stand face to 
face with Dr. Bond and doubt for a 
moment that he was close to a man who 
would die rather than surrender his 
manhood. 

First — His literary qualifications are 
not at discount; besides, he has con- 
stantly widened his views and deepened 
his culture, by study, prayer and con- 
secration to God. No culture equal to 
that produced in men when the refining 
fires of the Spirit go through and 
through their souls. Great as his liter- 
ary attainments are, he has never been 
his own physician, nex^er treated himself. 
Realizing fully that his own reason, 
will, and appetites, were vitiated, he ap- 
plied to another — our Lord — who healed, 
clothed and gave him sound mind. This 
is the culture for which he nleads. 

Second — He is cheerful without light- 
ness; has passed under the rod; knows 
what trial, temptation and bereavement 
mean. His face is toward the sunrise. 
He posseses a sunny nature and look- 
ing at him, in the Conference room, one 

would judge him to have the deep tranquility of eternity in his heart. His life, since 
the Lord spoke peace, has been one long rapture — reassuring in every trial. 

Third — He is a great citizen. Ethical questions have concerned him deeply; such 
as Temperance, Sabbath observance, and the honest administration of state affairs. 
He was never slow to express himself upon these and kindred subjects. Had he 
backed, in front of these enemies of the state and Church, he would not have been a 
representative of the Bonds whose lances have been shivered on many a foe. He is 
reserved, but count on him when the bugle sounds. He is not afraid to die. 

v, urtn — Socially, a most agreeable companion. With him a few moments and 
all he possesses of heart and life becomes yours. Any man is rich who has the confi- 
dence of our brother. 

Fifth — Recently his wife, the daughter of Bishop E. M. Marvin, passed away, 
l£ aVm T? the doctor and fam ily sorely bereft. Wife and mother in Heaven! What a 
thought! How real Heaven becomes! Glorious fellowships there; and others on the 
way thither. What rejoicing when the whole ship's company shall meet. 

Sixth — Dr. Bond supernumerated at our last session. Trust it is only for a 
brief time. 




314 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. W. J. JACKSON. 



Divine sonship is itself the supreme privilege that carries along 
Be carried. — Ira Maclaren. 

Rev. W. J. Jackson was 
born near Paris, Monroe 
County, Missouri, December 
8th, 1843. His father, Uncle 
Jimmie Jackson, came to the 
country in 1828 or 1829, and 
in an early day hearing of 
an appointment down toward 
Florida, saddled his horse 
and went. At the close of 
the service he said to the 
preacher, "I am not a church 
member but my wife is, and 
I want you to go home with 
me." Rev. B. H. Spencer, 
the preacher, said: "I'll go," 
and from that day on for 
years the Methodist Churcn 
worshipped in his house, 
with such men as Uncle Billy 
Haines and Harvey Patter- 
son for class leaders. This 
was on Bee Creek, two miles 
north of where Mount Zion 
Church now stands. Brother 
W. J. Jackson was licensed 
to preach by the Mount Zion 
Quarterly Conference in 
1879, and served as junior 
preacher on the Huntsville 
Circuit for one year under 
the Rev. J. P. Nolan, D. D. 
He was admitted on trial 
into the traveling connection 
at Columbia, Missouri, in 
September, 1880, and re- 
turned to Huntsville with 
Rev. Dr. Nolan. There be- 
ing no preacher for Lancaster Rev. W T. Toole requested Brother Jackson to change 
to that field, where, during the year, a great revival attended his efforts, as on the 
Huntsville Circuit. In 1871 Brother Jackson was sent to Kirksville, Missouri, where 
he was happily married to Miss Laura F. Violett. During the two years at Kirks- 
ville a new church was built near Lyons school house. The Conference at Carrollton 
in 1873 sent Brother Jackson to Paris, where he remained for three years. The 
membership was greatly built up and a new church built which, in honor of the work 
done, was called "Jackson Chapel." In 1876 Brother Jackson was sent to the Memphis 
Circuit where a number of interesting protracted meetings was held. The Conference 
in September, 1879, sent Brother Jackson to Moberly, and at the end of four years, 
though burned out once, a new brick church with parsonage had taken the place of 
the old ones. In the fall of 1883 Brother Jackson was transferred to the Denver 
Conference where he served as pastor of Pueblo one year; Presiding Elder of Denver 
District two years; then as agent of Pueblo Collegiate Institute, erected a fine school 
building at a cost of $10,000.00, and for five years was editor of the Colorado Metho- 
dist. At the completion of the college building he located and is now editor of the 
"Religious World," and is giving much of his time to the cause of missions, especially 
preaching for the soldiers at Fort Duchesne, Utah., and among many people scattered 
over the newly opened reservation in that state. His children are Victor Jackson, 
Violette Jackson and Florence Jackson. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 



315 



REV J. D. F, HOUCK. 



If God give us success, then to the feet of Jesus let our sheaves 
Be carried. — Ian Maclaran. 



By Rev. T. H. B. Anderson, D. D. 

Personal considerations cut 
no figure in giving a sketch of 
this brother's life. The writer 
knew him before he entered the 
ranks of the itineracy. We 
shall speak of him as his 
brethren in Missouri and Cali- 
fornia see him. 

First — He is a plain man 
with no extra touches to make 
himself conspicuous; wears his 
own clothes; and lives on sub- 
stantial food. If, by preaching 
a sermon, he could become the 
pastor of a city church he 
would refuse to preach. He is 
obedient to authority; loves his 
friends, and has no enemies to 
punish. He has iron in his 
blood. His power of endurance 
is as great as that of the 
German soldier in the trenches, 
or on the field, at Metz or 
Sedan. Here is a remarkable 
man. His friends under the 
skies of California, would not 
forgive us should we fail to say 
as much. Those who know him 
in Missouri esteem him highly. 
He is absolutely incorruptible. 
His nine years of toil in the 
Pacific, and three years in Mis- 
souri Conferences, have settled 
the fact that the Lord and 
church have in him a most use- 
ful minister. He is tempera- 
mentally a warm man. There 
is no zealothemial in his life; 

he never goes down to the freezing point. He lives at the line where summer 
begins. No man could have a more generous friend. 

Second— He is loyal to Methodism ; believes that it was launched to spread 
Scriptural holiness over these lands. "He is far removed from ritualism; has the idea 
largely developed that the "life of Christ" realized is the central thought. 

Third — He's a pastor of power. He never gives his people stimulants 
emotional in him is not great; nor does he appeal to it in others. He 
nourishment; milk to babes and strong meat to those of more mature years, 
divides the truth; gives saint and sinner each, their portion. 

Fourth — He has conversions under his ministry. His own conversion was pro- 
nounced; he insists that it shall be so with others. 

Fifth— He has been a student— since he entered the ministry. Early opportuni- 
ties were not great; but good books, brethren, who knew the truth, and, above all, 
God, have been his companions. Few have relied more implicity upon the Holy Spirit. 

Sixth— He is a wonderful expositor of the Bible; in a word, he is a ^reat gospel 
preacher. There is nothing else to preach, and he knows it. For clear insight, dis- 
criminating power, and forceful presentation of the truth, few preachers, of ins age, 
surpass him. 




The 

gives 

He 



316 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JOHN WESLEY KIMBRELL. 



The power of the keys is always personal. — Bishop Hendrix. 



By Rev. Henry E. Stout, A.M. 

What a son is does not only 
depend upon the atmosphere in 
which he is reared, but also upon 
the blood that flows through his 
veins. John W Kimbrell was 
blessed with both of these neces- 
sary qualifications. His father 
and mother, Marion and Kath- 
erine Kimbrell, settled in the 
early days in Madison County, 
Kentucky, in which place, on 
June 29th, 1872, John was born. 
These parents lived the "simple 
life," living close to nature and 
the God of nature. John had 
grown nearly to manhood before 
he heard the voice of God speak 
peace to his soul. It was under 
the ministry of Dev. C. W. Col- 
lett, at old Prairie Chapel, on 
the Fulton Circuit, that the 
Holy Spirit came to his heart in 
deep convicting and converting 
power, and made him a new 
creature in Christ Jesus. 

Since those days he has been 
"going on to perfection," being 
directed by the Spirit and taught 
of the Holy Scriptures. With 
Rev. R. H. Cooper as P.E., and 
Rev. V 0. White as P.C., he 
was licensed to preach in the 
spring of 1897, and the same 
year was recommended by the 
Mexico District Conference to 
the Missouri Annual Conference. 
It was Brother Kimbrell's joy to 
be received into the Annual 
Conference that fall by Bishop Fitzgerald, Rev. R. H. Cooper, P.E., during the session 
held at Albany. 

Taking up the work assigned him he finished his course in due time, was ordained 
Deacon at Fulton in 1899 by Bishop Granbery, and Elder by Bishop A. W- Wilson at 
Chillicothe in 1902. 

As every true Methodist preacher should do, he took his appointments as he re- 
ceived them, and gladly. They are as follows: Mokane, one year; Central College as 
a student, one year; New Franklin, one year; Madison, three years; Brookfield, two 
years; Clarence, two years, which place he now holds. Being evangelistic in turn, the 
Lord has wonderfully blessed his labors, giving him 525 souls for his hire, 345 of 
which he has received into the Church. Besides this a beautiful parsonage at Clarence 
stands as a monument to his good work. 

Brother Kimbrell attended the country schools till he had finished their courses 
and then went to Westminster at Fulton, two years, and later came to Central College 
for one year. On October 7th, 1902, Brother Kimbrell married the consecrated daughter 
of R. L. and Lillie Mitchell, to which union one child, Marion Richard Kimbrell, has 
come to bless the home. 

Into every life there comes the crucial tests which make or "unmake" the man. 
The trying time that came to our brother was his call to the ministry. He realized 
the nature of the work and felt his own unworthiness and unfitness for so great a 
work. He finally yielded, crying, "Here am I, send me." The grace of God being 
sufficient for him at this trying time he has met other conflicts and been the con- 
queror. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— MACON DISTRICT. 



317 




REV THEODORE BROWN FARRY. 



A pure heart is the Crowning Gift of the Spirit. — Bishop 
Marvin. 



Rev. Theodore Brown Farry, son of Silas Harvey Farry and Catherine Brown 
Farry, was born near Troy, Ohio, March 4th, 1846. Both parents were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. When he was still an infant, his parents settled on 
a farm near Rochester, Indiana, where he was reared. He was converted in 1857 on 
the banks of the Tippecanoe river, under the ministry of Rev. Jesse Sparks. He was 
brought under deep conviction of sin by the preaching of Rev. Sparks, which he tried 
to throw off, but when he yielded, the Lord most graciously heard his cry and filler* 
him with His love. The call to the ministry came soon after his conversion, but the 
dread of the responsibility kept him from uniting with the Church for some years. He 
was reclaimed in February, 1866. He was licensed to preach June 22nd, 1887, by the 
St. Charles Quarterly Conference; Rev. Samuel L. Woody, preacher in charge, and 
Rev. Joseph S. Allen, Presiding Elder; recommended to the Annual Conference for 
admission on trial by the same Quarterly Conference in July, 1888; received into the 
Annual Conference on trial in September, 1888, at Gallatin, Missouri; Rev. Joseph S. 
Allen, Presiding Elder, and E. R. Hendrix, Bishop; ordained Deacon by Bishop Joseph 
S. Key in September, 1890, at Fayette, Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop Atticus G. 
Haygood, in September, 1893, at Monroe City, Missouri. Appointments filled: Frank- 
ford, Missouri, 1888-1890; Florida, 1890-1892; Wright City, 1892-1894; Winfield, 1894- 
1896; Briscoe, 1896-1898; Green Castle, 1898-1900; Browning, 1900-1902; Jamesport, 
1902-1903; 1903, supernumerary and supplied the Bucklin Circuit; 1904, Bucklin Cir- 
cuit; 1905, appointed to Bucklin, changed by Presiding Elder to Brashear Circuit; 1906, 
Lakenan. He thinks that about 200 persons have been received into the Church during 
his ministry. His education was received at the country schools, except about two 
years in a graded school. He was married to Miss Anna Belle Hayes, June 28th, 1894, 
and have the following named children: Cranston Hayes, who died in infancy; Esther 
Marie, and Otis Theodore Farry. He considers his call to the ministry when only a 
boy, and after refusal to do his duty, his final entering into the work, as the most 
important crisis in his life. The "Biographies of Spurgeon," "Pierce," "Simpson," 
"Carradine's Works" and the "Christian's Secret of a Happy Life" are all books that 
have greatly helped him. 



318 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE. 




ROBERT BROWNING. 



1 806— CENTENNIAL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 



HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



Presiding Elder .1. T. Nash 

Hannibal, Park Ch J. H. Jackson 

Hannibal, Arch St.. .J. Anderson 

New London and Hydesburg. . .J. I. Sears 



Palmyra Sta. 
Palmyra Ct. . 
La Belle Ct.. 
Lewiston Ct. . 
Monticello Ct. . 
Canton Sta.. 
Wayland Ct.. 
Gorn Ct.. 
Saverton Ct. . 
Monroe City Sta. 



.F. Marvin 

... -C. L. Uht 

.E. E. Bostwick 

G. B. Smith 

S. R. Dillman 

T. Penn 

.B. F. Leake 

T. A. Allison 

.C. I. Flory 

. G. A. Lehnhoff 



Monroe City Ct. . 
Stoutsville. 
Supernumeraries . 



Hunnewell Ct. . 

Supernumerary 

Shelbyville Ct.. 

Novelty Ct.. 

Maywood Ct. . 

Kahoka Sta.. 

Prof, in Vanderbilt University 

... .0. E. Brown 
Prof, in Centenary Academy. .C. I. Flory 
Sunday School Secretary. ..H. C. Garrett 



J. O. Whit worth 

To be supplied 

.C. A. Sherman 

R. W Howerton 

.R. White 

. . L. F, Parker 

.J. J. Reed 

. C. J. Chappell 

. E. J. Speer 

W. D. Neale 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 319 



REV ISAAC TIP NASH. 



The greatness of God culminates in Sacrifice. — Dr. Bushnell. 



By Rev. Ward M. Baker. 

Rev. I. T. Nash, son of Reuel Nash and Mercy Nash, was born in Michigan, 
January 1st, 1864, and born again in a meeting conducted by Rev. D. C. O'Howell 
and Rev. George W. Mitchell, the latter of the Christian Union Church, in Holt, 
Missouri, in 1883. There was no church in the town then, but at an altar in the 
school house the great crisis of his life came in a happy conversion. With purpose 
of heart he has served God in the ministry to which God called him. He was educated 
in the public schools and for a short time at William Jewell College. July 29th, 1888, 
he was married to Miss Carrie E. Gill. Three sons, Vernon M. Nash, Emory P Nash 
and Willard L. Nash, and two daughters, Eska W- Nash and Lois K. Nash, have 
blessed their home. Brother Nash was secured to supply the Missouri City Circuit 
the latter half of the Conference year 1885-1886. He was licensed to preach by the 
Second Quarterly Conference of that Circuit in March, 1886, Rev. D. C. O'Howell, 
Presiding Elder. He was received on trial September, 1886, at St. Joseph, Missouri, 
Bishop McTyeire, presiding; ordained Deacon at Gallatin, Missouri, by Bishop Hendrix, 
in September, 1888, and Elder by Bishop Key at Fayette, Missouri, in September, 
1890. Being appointed to Hardin, 1886, he served for a year and was appointed to 
Cowgill; Bogard and Humphreys Circuits were each under his pastorate for a term 
of two years; on the Humphreys Circuit he built the Fairview and Hamilton churches. 
He then gave four of the best years of his life to the work in the bounds of the Hale 
charge; Jamesport for one year and built there a parsonage; Jameson Circuit, three 
years, and again building a parsonage; Lineville, 1900-1901. The full term of the pas- 
torate was spent on the Norborne Station, with good ingatherings each year, increase 
of salary, full collections, better Sunday Schools, prayer meetings and League work, 
and then a crowning success, the magnificent new church costing $7,000. After having 
remained only one year at Plattsburg, he was made Presiding Elder of the Hannibal 
District. With careful and minute preparation, Brother Nash makes his pulpit a true 
throne; always clear, interesting and thoughtful, he makes truth stand forth most 
forcibly. "About his Father's business" summarizes his ministry. He advocates every 
principle and every reform that commends itself to his heart. He is fearless, steady 
and fruitful. He walks with God along the way leading the hosts onward. 



320 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- JOHN HAMPTON JACKSON. 



Righteousness is the security of the Universe, and Heaven is the 
God-built, eternal home of men who touched the atoning Saviour 
With the reverent, grateful hand of Faith. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Rev. John Hampton Jackson is a na- 
tive of West Virginia. He is a son of 
Robert Francis Jackson and Phoebe Sa- 
lina Jackson. He was converted January 
21st, 1874, at Charleston, West Virginia, 
under the ministry of Rev. Adam Given, 
and joined the Church at the same time. 
He was licensed to preach April 18th, 
1875, by the Quarterly Conference of 
Charleston District; Rev. Joshua C. Tins- 
ley, preacher in charge, and Rev. L. B. 
Madison, Presiding Elder. He was rec- 
ommended to the Annual Conference by 
the Cedar Grove Quarterly Conference, 
August 25th, 1875 ; and was received into 
the Annual Conference in 1877; Rev. 
Russell Chambers, Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop John C. Keener, presiding. He 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop David 
Seth Doggett, in 1879, at Clarkesburg, 
West Virginia; he was ordained Elder 
by Bishop John C. Keener, in 1880, at 
Ashland, Kentucky. He has served the 
following appointments: New Martins- 
ville, West Virginia, four years; Point 
Pleasant, one year; Catlettsburg, Ken- 
tucky, four years; Huntington, West 
Virginia, two years; Columbia, Missouri, 
four years; Mexico, two years; Park 
Church, Hannibal, four years; Hundley 
Church, St. Joseph, one year; Fulton, 
four years; Chillicothe, two years; now 
in second year of second pastorate at 
Park Church, Hannibal. He has received about two thousand persons into the Church. 
The following churches have been built under his pastorate: New Martinsville, West 
Virginia; Catlettsburg, Kentucky; Fulton, Missouri, and Park Church, Hannibal, Mis- 
souri. He attended the public schools of his state, the High School of Brighton, Penn- 
sylvania, and the private school of Professor Patrick, at Charleston, West Virginia. 
He was married to Miss Ella S. Cox, September 26th, 1882, and their children are: 
John Joe Jackson, Ella Susan Jackson and Frank Wells Jackson. Some of the books 
aside from the Bible, which have been of great help to him are "Ralston's Elements of 
Divinity,'; "Bledsoe's Theodicy," and "Natural Law in Spiritual World." Brother 
Jackson is a popular preacher in the best sense of the word popular. He holds the 
attention of his audience with remarkable power, and it is a pleasure to hear him. 
He is strong in revival work and he brings up his church to marked efficiency. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



321 




REV FIELDING MARVIN, D.D. 



He that finds God a sweet, enveloping thought. — Emerson. 



Fielding Marvin, son of Bishop Enoch Mather Marvin and Harriet Brotherton 
(Clark) Marvin, was born November 1st, 1849, at LaGrange, Missouri. Both parents 
were members of the Methodist Church. He was converted about 1864, at Mt. Zion 
Church, St. Charles County, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. R. P. Holt, and joined 
the Church at the same time and place. His growth in grace has been retarded by 
having met many defeats, but his daily motto is, "Fight the good fight of faith," and 
his prayer is to know and to be given strength to do the will of God. He was licensed 
to preach March 11th, 1889, by the Quarterly Conference of Palmyra Station, Hannibal 
District; Rev. J. R. A. Vaughan, presiding at Quarterly Conference, and Rev. W. W. 
McMurry, Presiding Elder; was recommended to the Annual Conference for admis- 
sion on trial that same year at the Third Quarterly Conference at Palmyra; was re- 
ceived into the Annual Conference on trial in 1889; Rev. W. W. McMurry, Presiding 
Elder and Bishop J. C. Granbery, presiding; ordained Deacon by Bishop R. K. Har- 
grove, September 6th, 1891, at Maryville, Missouri, and ordained Elder by Bishop A. 
G. Haygood in September, 1893, at Monroe City, Missouri. Appointments served have 
been: Monroe City, Kirksville, Edina Circuit, New Franklin Circuit, Mexico, Macon, 
Fayette and Palmyra. He received his education at the public schools and Pritchett 
School Institute, now Pritchett College, at Glasgow, Missouri. He was married to 
Miss Georgia Casey, October 31st, 1895. and they have two children, Mather Casey 
Marvin and Edwin Lakenan Marvin. His conversion has been the most important 
crisis in his life. Some of the books, aside from the Bible, which have proven beneficial 
to him, have been Thomas A. Kempis' "Imitation of Christ," and Luthardt's "Funda- 
mentals of Christianity." 



322 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- JOHN ANDERSON, D.D. 



Men who have an ideal, and work under its inspiration and 
Influence, are the practical men who move the world. — Dr. Wm. 
E. Munsey. 



By Rev. W A. Hanna. 






Rev. John Anderson, D.D., son 
of George W Anderson and 
Mary Anderson, was born in 
Platte County, Missouri, March 
6th, 1848. He was converted 
when eight years old and united 
with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He entered Cen- 
tral College at Fayette, Missouri, 
in the fall of 1866, and in 1869 
was graduated in the School of 
Moral Philosophy from the Uni- 
versity of Virginia. In 1870 he 
was admitted into the traveling 
connection by the Missouri Con- 
ference, at Columbia, and was 
appointed to Maryville Circuit. 
He was married, March 22nd, 
1872, to Miss Virginia Frances 
Drace, now deceased, and was at 
the same time transferred to the 
Pacific Conference. Failing in 
health, he made a study of law, 
but the flattering prospects be- 
fore him were suppressed by the 
conviction that he had been 
called of God to preach. That 
he did not become a lawyer and 
compromise his call to preach by 
being a local preacher was due 
to the influence of that good 
man, Rev. C. I. VanDeventer. 
The following are his appoint- 
ments to date: Tenth Street 
Church, St. Joseph, Missouri; 
Craig Circuit, Chillicothe Dis- 
trict, Carrollton, Fayette, Agent 
of Howard College, Hannibal 
District, Macon District, Fayette District, Mexico District, Mexico, Gallatin and Arch 
Street, Hannibal. His children are: Dr. George Anderson, Mrs. Mary Minerva Porch, 
Galen Raymond Anderson, John Clark Anderson, Robert Enoch Anderson and Paul 
Drace Anderson. Dr. Anderson was elected delegate to the General Conferences of 
1890, 1894, 1898 and 1902, and he most efficiently filled that responsible position. He 
has been a member of the Board of Curators of Central Female College, Howard- 
Payne College and Central College for many years. The plan of conducting our 
female Colleges by salaried Presidents was proposed and urged by him, and the 
present method has been brought about in a large measure by that presentation of 
the matter. The degree of D.D. was conferred upon him by Central College in 1901. 
On May 8th, 1906, he was married to Mrs. A. A. Mount, at Gallatin, Missouri. In 
his preaching he always places special emphasis on the main truth that Jesus Christ 
is a living, personal Saviour and man's only hope. He is a clear, strong and aggres- 
sive preacher, and a most earnest worker. He has had uniform prosperity in his 
work; as pastor and Presiding Elder, in building churches, in conversions and in 
additions to the Church. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



323 



REV OSWALD EUGENE BROWN, A.M., D.D. 

The history of hrman thought, since men began to think deeply 
Upon the person of Christ, shows that in the last analysis God 
Is in Christ reconciling the world unto himself. — Bishop 
Hendrix. 



Rev. Oswald Eugene Brown 
was born near Canton, Mis- 
souri, December 8th, 1861. His 
father's family were Methodists 
and their house was ever the 
preacher's home. His mother's 
family, the Travises, were Pres- 
byterians, and have furnished 
several ministers to that church. 
Both families came from Vir- 
ginia about 1833 and settled in 
Lewis County, Missouri. Eugene 
attended the country schools 
and was a regular attendant 
upon church and Sunday School. 
He was baptized in infancy by 
the Rev. C. I. VanDeventer and 
when eleven years old took the 
vows of membership and joined 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, under the pastorate of 
Rev. J. S. Smith. At fourteen 
years of age he entered Chris- 
tian University at Canton, Mis- 
souri, from which institution he 
graduated, taking the A. B. 
degree in 1881, being valedic- 
torian of his class. Later he 
was given the A. M. degree. For 
a few years he taught school, 
was deputy county clerk of 
Lewis County, Missouri, read 
law and was admitted to the 
bar, but feeling called of God to 
better things, he yielded to the 
promptings of the Spirit, and 
decided to give his life to God in the work of the minitsry. Me deemed it important to be 
well prepared and equipped for the work so immediately went to Nashville, Tennessee, 
and entered Vanderbilt University, taking the B.D. degree in 1889. In his work there 
he received the Founder's Medal for highest grade in the entire course and was ap- 
pointd to a graduate fellowship which gave him another year at Vanderbilt. At the 
close of his work in Vanderbilt he offered himself as a missionary, was accepted and 
assigned to China. In August, 1890, he was married to Miss Anne J. Muse of At- 
lanta, Georgia, who was a returned missionary. They at once sailed for China, where 
for two years he studied the language and worked earnestly among this people, his 
wife being a great help to him, she having spent several years in the work. He had 
just begun to preach in Chinese when he was elected Professor to the Chair of Church 
History in Vanderbilt University. He at first refused to leave the mission field, but 
receiving letters from some of the bishops and the biblical faculty of the University 
urging the importance of the work of training young men for the ministry, after 
earnest prayer for guidance, he yielded, feeling God was calling him to the work. He 
and Mrs. Brown returned to Nashville in October, 1892, and he took up his work 
there, being useful in strengthening the faith and zeal of many of our young min- 
isters. He is much sought after for missionary addresses. He spends his summer 
vacation giving Bible study work at Student Conferences. These Conferences, the 
Young Men's Christian Association, and the Young Women's Christian Association, 
claim much of his thought and time. He is especially interested in the Sunday school 
work, conducting an adult Bible class at Tulip Street Church in Nashville, and he con- 
tributes regularly to the Sunday School Magazine. Some years ago Central College 
conferred the degree of D. D. upon him. His work in the University still continues, 
where he enjoys the privilege of directing the thought of many of the important work 
to which they are called. 

This page is presented by Mrs. R. K. Brown. 




324 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MR. WILIAM McMURRAY. 



The most beautiful sight on earth is an aged saint of God, 
Growing cheerful in his faith as life advances, becoming mellowed 
In his love, and more and more visibly pervaded and brightened 
By the clear light of Religion. — Dr. Bushnell. 



The subject of this sketch 
was born near Lebanon, Ken- 
tucky, December 10th, 1795. 
His father, John McMurray, 
was of Scotch blood, claiming 
his descent from the Earl of 
Murray, thus connecting him 
with the Stuart line of Scot- 
land and England and through 
them back to Robert Bruce. 
John McMurray pre-empted six 
hundred acres of land in the 
Kentucky wilderness in 1788, 
and took his wife and babe 
from Hampshire County, Vir- 
ginia, to his claim, accompanied 
by three brothers and a sister 
with their families. He pro- 
ceeded at once to establish a 
home where he lived the re- 
mainder of his days, rearing a 
family of four sons and five 
daughters, all of whom lived to 
see their grandchildren. The 
babe mentioned above, carried 
by the mother on horsebacK 
from Virginia to Kentucky, 
eventually became the mother 
of Sue A. Morrison of Denver, 
Colorado, who died March 3d, 
1907, and who was perhaps the 
most widely known woman in 
Southern Methodism. When 
the subject of this sketch at- 
tained the age of eighteen years 
the call was made by the Gov- 
ernor for men to go to the help 
of General Jackson at New Or- 
leans; he responded and was sent down and took part in that memorable battle. He 
was reared under Presbyterian influences. His father was one of eleven persons who 
formed a Presbyterian society in a log cabin in the woods where Lebanon, Ky., now 
stands. He never made any open profession of religion or joined any church until 
after his marriage in 1822. The Methodists had no organization before that time 
in the settlement, but Rev. W. H. Kavanaugh held a meeting in the neighborhood, 
and about all the McMurrays were swept into the church, this one with the rest. 
He was soundly converted and became a very active, zealous member and remained 
so the balance of his days. He was of the shouting variety. During his last sick- 
ness, which was of six months' duration, he would, while lying quietly on his bed, sud- 
denly break forth in shouts of praises. He literally went to Heaven shouting. His 
religion was a very conscientious type; duty and obligation were terms much in use 
with him. In 1835 he moved with his family to Marion County, Missouri. Church 
privileges were very meager then in that region, and he held prayer meeitngs in 
private houses. In the fall of 1835 Rev. L. B. Stateler was sent to the Canton Cir- 
cuit, a class was formed in his house, and that was the preaching place. In 1842 
he moved to Shelby County, Missouri, and a class was organized in his house there, 
and this continued to be the preaching place while he lived. It was his desire to 
have one of his sons preach the Word, and a few years after his departure from 
earth his son, Rev. W. W McMurray was admitted into the Missouri Conference and 
did valiant service in his chosen calling. William McMurray fell asleep on February 
23d, 1852. This memorial page is furnished by Brother John F. McMurry of 
Shelbina, Mo. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



325 



MRS. MARTHA ELLEN LOWMAN. 



But the sheet-anchor of the boy's tenderness was his mother. 

— Dr. D. R. McAnally. 



Mrs. Martha Ellen Lowman 
was born in Lebanon, Ken- 
tucky, in the year 1833. She 
was the daughter of Mr. Mar- 
cus Graham who came to Vir- 
ginia in an early day from 
County Tyrone, North Ireland, 
a county lying south of Lon- 
donderry. The family was 
Scotch-Irish to the bone, and 
Presbyterian. Mrs. Lowman 
was brought up a Protestant 
and a Presbyterian. A sister, 
Mrs. A. J. Bricken, of Lebanon, 
Kentucky, survives and abides 
a Presbyterian. A brother, 
Mr. James R. Graham, lives at 
Clinton, Kentucky, and is a 
Methodist. Mrs. Lowman was 
married twice; first to Emman- 
uel Lemon Gray of Bardstown, 
Kentucky, and to this union 
eight children were born, four 
of them having been taken to 
the heavenly home in infancy. 
The family came to Shelby 
County, Missouri, in 1852. One 
of the sons, Mr. William Rob- 
ert Gray, lives near Bacon 
Chapel in Shelby County. An- 
other son, Mr. David Graham 
Gray, lives near Clarence, Mis- 
souri. Rev. M. L. Gray, of the 
Missouri Conference, is also 
one of her sons. Her only 
daughter, Mrs. Anna J. Ballard, 
lives at Bacon Chapel. Em- 
manuel Lemon Gray died in 
1869 and is buried in Patton Cemetery near Morris Chapel, Shelby County, Missouri. 
In 1872 Mrs. Gray married Mr. William 0. Lowman. Mr. Lowman was one of the 
honored citizens of Shelby County, and a Methodist. His son, Mr. S. B. Lowman, was 
county surveyor of Shelby County for sixteen years, and his daughter, Mrs. Mary 
J. Duncan, is the mother of Rev. Charles B. Duncan of the Missouri Conference. Mrs. 
Martha Ellen Lowman, by a branch of the Graham family living in Philadelphia, is 
related to Bishop Duncan of Spartanburg, South Carolina. It was pioneer life in 
Shelby county when the family first came out from Kentucky and among the neighbors 
may be mentioned Mr. Robert Graham, William Graham, John Graham, Lacy Morris, 
David Noble, James Chenoweth, Joseph Perry, Rev. W. W. McMurry, John McMurry 
and William Hirlinger. Most of these are no more. Mrs. Lowman died September 
17th, 1900, and is buried at Morris Chapel, Shelby County, Missouri. At the burial 
loving friends had lined the grave with white and roses and there the dearest of 
mothers sleeps till the dawning of the day. 

Mr. William R. Gray married Miss Cornelia Carroll and they have one daughter, 
Mrs. Bertha McMaster, living near Shelbyville. Mr. David G. Gray married Miss Mollie 
Melson and they have six children — Florence, William Lemon, Frank, Anna Pearl, 
Martha Ellen, and Joseph Gray. 




326 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. WILLIAM WESLEY McMURRY. 



He needs no foil but shines by his own proper light. — Dryden. 



By Rev. Ch.arjes B. Duncan, A. M. 

William Wesley McMurry 
was born in Marion County, 
Missouri, March 24th, 1837. He 
was the eighth child of a fam- 
ily of ten children. His par- 
ents, William and Elizabeth 
Wilson McMurry, were from 
Marion County, Kentucky. He 
was converted and joined the 
church at a camp-meeting held 
at the old North River camp 
ground near Shelbyville, Mis- 
souri, in the year 1855. After 
one year in the Shelbyville 
High School and two years 
spent in teaching district school 
he was licensed to preach, and 
received on trial into the Mis- 
souri Conference in the fall of 
1858. Two years later he was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop 
Kavanaugh at St. Charles. In 
March, 1865, at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, he was ordained elder. 
May 31, 1862, he was married 
to Miss Mary E. Williams of 
Colony, Missouri, who contrib- 
uted her share to the success of 
his life-work. To them were 
born eleven children, one of 
whom, Dr. W- F. McMurry, is 
now Secretary of the General 
Board of Church Extension. 
Two years of his active minis- 
try were spent as principal of 
Shelbyville High School, thir- 
teen years in the Presiding El- 
dership, and nineteen in the 
pastorate. For two years during the Civil war he retired to his farm. In 1890, he 
was a delegate to the General Conference at St. Louis. In 1894, he took the super- 
numerary relation and one year later superannuated. He sustained this relation to 
the church until his death at Shelbina, Missouri, April 4, 1904. 

In his character were united strong native gifts with deep fervent piety. Sound 
judgment, foresight, wisdom, courage, unselfishness, sympathy and simplicity all com- 
bined to make him a strong and useful man. As a preacher he had rare gifts. His 
preaching was strong, clear, very spiritual and always inspiring. His message was 
delivered with an unction and tenderness that always reached the hearts of his hearers 
and the results were permanent. Many young men were called of God to preach 
under his ministry, Forty-five from Shelby County have entered the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he, more than any other man is responsible 
for the type of Methodism that prevails there. He was very successful as a church- 
builder. In addition to a number of others he was instrumental in building ten in one 
county. He was a wise counselor and men seemed to instinctively turn to him for ad- 
vice. As a Presiding Elder he demonstrated most clearly his great abilities. He knew 
men and could lead and inspire them. He also had comprehensive and thorough know- 
ledge of his district and knew how to suit men to their work. He was fruitful in 
initiating improvements and skillful in bringing such enterprises to a consummation. 
He possessed many of the elements of ecclesiastical statesmanship. He was that 
type of Christian manhood which parents delight to hold before their children as an 
example. He will continue to speak through the years to come, and the measure of 
his influence, especially upon the Methodism of Northeast Missouri, can be deter- 
mined only in eternity. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



327 



REV BERRY HILL SPENCER. 



The Infinite Love concentrates in the Cross. — Bishop Marvin. 



By Rev. E. D. Watson, A. 
Died 



M. 



Born March 23, 1819 
August 2, 1883. 

His parents, Thomas Spencer 
and Elizabeth Senter Spencer, 
lived in Burk County, North 
Carolina, where Berry Hill was 
born March 23, 1819. They 
came to Missouri that year, set- 
tling in Cape Girardeau County, 
where the son grew to manhood. 
The parents were staunch Meth- 
odists, the mother especially a 
devout and earnest Christian, 
impressing her character upon 
her children, emphatically so 
upon Berry Hill, who joined the 
church when sixteen as a seeker 
and on probation under the min- 
istry of the sainted Rev. Uriel 
Haw. He was soundly con- 
verted, when 19, while his moth- 
er was praying by the bedside of 
a sick sister, who, with another 
sister, was also converted at the 
same time. Solemnly impressed 
with his duty to preach, he was 
licensed to exhort by his pastor, 
Rev. Nelson Henry of the Rip- 
ley Mission. Such was the con- 
fidence placed in him that, while 
yet an exhorter, he was placed 
in charge of Ripley Mission 
January 5, 1842. At his first 
Quarterly Conference he was 
licensed to preach, Rev. Nelson 
Henry, Presiding Elder. In 
September he was appointed by 
the Presiding Elder to take 
charge of Greenville Circuit. 
He was received on trial into the 

Missouri Conference at Lexington in September, 1843, Bishop Soule presiding. He 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop Soule at Columbia, October 7, 1845, and Elder by 
Bishop Capers at Glasgow October 3, 1847. He was married to Miss Caroline 
Mourning Clark Austin of Monroe County, October 11th, 1849. Their children are 
Mary Elizabeth Thomas, Palmyra, Missouri; Thomas Edwin Spencer, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri; Richard Austin Spencer, Hannibal, Missouri; Martha Susan Eakle, Amarillo, 
Texas; William Linn Spencer, Des Moines, Iowa; Ida Davis Strother, Kansas City, 
Missouri; Carrie May Boulware, Palmyra; Dora Hill Spencer (deceased); Bertie 
Beryl Watson (wife of Rev. E. D. Watson of the Missouri Conference) ; Jessie Mans- 
field Nichols, Palmyra, Missouri. The wife died while on a visit at Kansas City 
December 6th 1900. 

His appointments were as follows: Oregon Circuit, 1843; Carrollton, 1844, 1845; 
Brunswick, 1846; Paris, 1847, 1848; Fayette, 1849; Liberty, 1850; Fulton, 1851; 
Columbia, 1852, 1853; St. Louis, 1854; Hannibal, 1855; Palmyra, 1856, 1857; Louis- 
iana, 1858; Presiding Elder Fayette District, 1859; Presiding Elder St. Charles Dis- 
trict, 1860, 1861, 1862. Banished to Indiana in 1863; Presiding Elder St. Charles Dis- 
trict, 1864, 1865; Presiding Elder Hannibal District, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1869; Shelby- 
ville Circuit, 1870; Hydesburg Circuit, 1871; Presiding Elder Macon District, 187^, 
1873, 1874, 1875; Hydesburg Circuit, 1876; Mount Olivet Circuit, 1877, 1878; Monroe 
City Circuit, 1879; Presiding Elder Fayette District, 1880, 1881; Monroe City Lir- 
cuit 1882 

'From the very first of his long ministry the greatest confidence was reposed in 
him by his brethren of the ministry. He was elected delegate to the General Con- 
ference, and was a member of every session, but one, of that body from 1858 to i»»^. 




328 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MR. THOMAS E. THOMPSON. 



Sacred things disclosed their divinest significance to him; he 
Heard inaudible voices and saw the Invisible. — Bishop Marvin. 



By Colonel R. E. Anderson. 

Thomas E. Thompson was 
born in Westmoreland County, 
Virginia, April 9, 1809. At the 
age of 17 years he was con- 
verted. Upon the death of the 
Superintendent of the School in 
which he was engaged he was 
put in his place and for forty- 
six years, with scarcely a break, 
he held this office, first in Vir- 
ginia and then in Missouri. He 
had the genial nature which 
gives a man power with children 
and the earnest faith which 
feels the worth of the soul and 
the value of Divine knowledge. 
Upon his conversion he joined 
the Methodist Church in 
Fauquier County, Virginia, in 
1826. On the 28th of June, 
1832, he was married to Miss 
Margaret M. A. Williams. In 
1836, Brother Thompson irr'wed 
to Ralls County, Missouri, and 
shortly afterwards went to 
Hannibal and engaged in Mer- 
cantile pursuits. As an ac- 
countant he was eminently 
skillful, painstaking and accur- 
ate. He was not honest in a 
merely formal way. He had 
that spirit of integrity which 
gave his character a very fine 
fiber and high tone. 

Owing to his general adapta- 
bility to the office, he was 
elected Clerk of the Circuit 
Court of Marion County in 
1874 and came to Palmyra to reside and continued in that capacity for twelve con- 
secutive years. More than once he was elected Mayor of the city and in that posi- 
tion his administration was systematic, economical and just, while monuments of his 
good judgment and artistic taste are still visible in many localities. 

Pressed with the cares of higher duties he inaugurated a system of private 
banking and became the custodian of large amounts of money, and in this way did 
much good in financial circles and conferred equal benefits on all classes. In 1867 
he was elected President of the Marion County Savings Bank and continued in that 
capacity until April 11, 1873, when he was removed by his sudden and lamented death. 
Though he made the Sunday School work a specialty he had an intelligent interest in 
all the affairs and enterprises of the Church. His sympathies were world-wide and 
took in the whole scope of the Master's kingdom. He prayed and labored for the 
extension of the dominion of Christ over all nations. From the time that lay del- 
egation was introduced into the Church he was chosen a delegate to every session of 
the Missouri Conference. He was also a member of the General Conference in 1870 
and of the Sunday School convention at Nashville in 1871. In these bodies he was 
active and efficient in committee work. 

Bishop Marvin in speaking of him, says: "My acquaintance with Brother 
Thompson began when I took charge of the church at Hannibal in the fall of 1846 
I was his pastor afterwards in Palmyra. There was never the slightest shadow be- 
tween us. There was always the open sunlight of sunlight and love. How I loved 
this man! Even now I rejoice in the expectation that this hallowed friendship incip- 
ient on earth, will be crowned and consummated in heaven." ' 





PALMYRA SUNDAY SCHOOL 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



329 



PALMYRA METHODIST SABBATH SCHOOL. 



THOMAS E. THOMPSON, SUPT. 



1. 


Miss 


2. 


Miss 


5. 


Miss 


4. 


Miss 


5. 


Miss 


6. 


Miss 


7. 


Miss 


8. 


Miss 


9. 


Miss 


10. 


Miss 


11. 


Miss 


12. 


Miss 


13. 


Miss 


14. 


Miss 


15. 


Miss 


16. 


Miss 


17.. 


Miss 


18. 


Miss 


19. 


Miss 


20. 


Miss 


21. 


Miss 


22. 


Miss 


23. 


Miss 


24. 


Miss 


25. 


Miss 


26. 


Miss 


27. 


Miss 


28. 


Miss 


29. 


Miss 


30. 


Miss 


31. 


Miss 


32. 


Miss 


33. 


Miss 


34. 


Miss 


35. 


Miss 


36. 


Miss 


37. 


Miss 


38. 


Mrs. 


39. 


Miss 


40. 


Miss 


41. 


Miss 


42. 


Miss 


43. 


Miss 


44. 


Miss 


45. 


Miss 


46. 


Miss 


47. 


Miss 


48. 


Miss 


49. 


Miss 


50. 


Miss 


51. 


Miss 


52. 


Miss 


53. 


Miss 


54. 


Miss 


55. 


Miss 


56. 


Miss 


57. 


Miss 


58. 


Miss 


59. 


Miss 


60. 


Miss 


61. 


Miss 


62. 


Miss 


63. 


Miss 


64. 


Miss 


65. 


Miss 


66. 


Miss 


67. 


Miss 


68. 


Miss 


69. 


Miss 


70. 


Miss 


71. 


Miss 


72. 


Miss 


73. 


Miss 


74. 


Mrs. 


75. 


Miss 


76. 


Miss 


77. 


Miss 


78. 


Miss 


79. 


Miss 


80. 


Miss 


81. 


Miss 


82. 


Miss 


S3. 


Miss 


84. 


Miss 


S5. 


Miss 



Lizzie Bourland 
Maggie Everly 
Julia Pittman 
Mamie Johnson 
Sue Bowman 
Katie Redd 
Betty Balthrop 
Mary Balthrop 
Josie Bradley 
Annie Sappington 
Irene Lucky 
Laura Shannon 
Sarah Shannon 
Jennie Windsor 
Laura Megquier 
Julia Biggers 
Lillie Logan 
Emma Jones 
Maggie Rush 
Bettie Watts 
Jennie Widderfield 
Jennie Lee 
Ragie Chandler 
Mollie Davis 
Mary Henretzie 
Clarrie Tatlow 
Jennie Bradley 
Mary Chandler 
Ada Fletcher 
Katie Johnson 
Belle Biggers 
Alice Noble 
Mary Taylor 
Mary Longmire 
Laura Windsor 
Mary Thomas 
Katie Thomas 
Bell Drescher 
Mary Bross 
Alice Arbogast 
Ella Yancey 
Ada Rush 
Caddie Bross 
Maggie Walker 
Nannie Lipscomb 
Lonie Widderfield 
Lizzie Drescher 
Lillie Decamp 
Katie Wishart 
Fannie Hart 
Annie Highland 
Minnie Deamer 
Josie Nicol 
Dellie Smith 
Maggie Nicol 
Pamelia Liborius 
Bettie Fant 
Jennie Johnson 
Jennie Chandler 
Katie Metcalf 
Nannie Thompson 
Ella Hart 
Mollie Flannagan 
Ida Yancey 
Eva Hart 
Mollie Sprague 
Rebecca Lear 
Mary Willis 
Emma Traeger 
Jennie Traeger 
Glover Crane 
Katie Yencey 
Fannie Johnson 
Mollie Bradley 
Annie Foster 
Katie Dooley 
Annia Neal 
Louisa Kratz 
Ada Cole 
Ella Bradley 
Alice Cole 
Bell -Willis 
Ella Ross 
Cora Shannon 
Annie Lee 



86.' 


Miss 


87. 


Miss 


88. 


Miss 


89. 


Miss 


90. 


Miss 


91. 


Miss 


92. 


Miss 


93. 


Miss 


94. 


Miss 


95. 


Miss 


96. 


Miss 


97. 


Miss 


98. 


Miss 


99. 


Miss 


100. 


Miss 


101. 


Miss 


102. 


Miss 


103. 


Miss 


104. 


Miss 


105. 


Miss 


106. 


Miss 


107. 


Miss 


108. 


Miss 


109. 


Miss 


110. 


Miss 


111. 


Miss 


112. 


Miss 


113. 


Miss 


114. 


Miss 


115. 


Mrs. 


116. 


Rev. 


117. 


Rev. 


118. 


Miss 


119. 


Miss 


120. 


Miss 


121. 


Miss 




fer 


122. 


Miss 


123. 


Miss 


124. 


Miss 


125. 


Miss 


126. 


Miss 


127. 


Miss 


128. 


Miss 


129. 


Miss 


130. 


Miss 


131. 


Miss 


132. 


Miss 


133. 


Miss 


134. 


Miss 


135. 


Miss 


136. 


Miss 


137. 


Miss 


138. 


Miss 


139. 


Miss 


140. 


Miss 


141. 


Miss 


142. 


Miss 


143. 


Miss 


144. 


Miss 


145. 


Miss 


146. 


Miss 


147. 


Miss 


148. 


Miss 


149. 


Miss 


150. 


Miss 


151. 


Miss 


152. 


Miss 


153. 


Miss 


154. 


Miss 


155. 


Miss 


156. 


Miss 


157. 


Miss 


158. 


Mrs. 


159. 


Mrs. 


160. 


Mrs. 


161. 


Mrs. 


162. 


Mrs. 


163. 


Mrs. 


164. 


Mrs. 


165. 


Mrs. 


166. 


Mrs. 


167. 


Mrs. 


168. 


Mrs. 


169. 


Mrs. 



Georgia Lee 170. 

Mary Berghoeffer 171. 

Katie Berghoeffer 172. 

Eva McCarty 173. 

Katie Weidhas 174. 

Cornelia Weidhas 175. 

Mary Painter 176. 

Alice Redd 177. 

Katie Bowman 179. 

Sarah Lear 180. 

Carrie Liborius 181. 

Lizzie Nicol 182. 

Hattie Nicol 183. 

Jennie McCarty 184. 

Carrie McCarty 185. 

Lizzie Schwartz 186. 

Lizzie Nicol 187. 

Julia McCarty 188. 

Flora Painter 189. 

Katie Happle 190. 

Ella Lear 191. 

Ella Fletcher 192. 

Carry Liborius 193. 

Mary Biggers 194. 

Maggie Anderson 195. 

Julia Anderson 196. 

Lulia Brady 197. 

Annie Highland 198. 

Minnie Redd 199. 

Julia Thompson 200. 

H. A. Bourland 201. 

W M. Newland 202. 

Lou Berghoeffer 203. 

Lou Heintze 204. 

Katie Shaul 205. 
Pamelia Berghoef-206. 

207. 

Mary Deemer 208. 

Lizzie Deemer 209. 

Mary Cleffmiller 210. 

Lizzie Gross 211. 

Annie Snitzer 212. 

Mary Gross 213. 

Nettie Newbower 214. 

Minnie Volbraght 215. 

Katie Kratz 216. 

Emmie Schwartz 217. 

Anice Logan 218. 

Annie Metcalf 219. 

Hallie Sosey 220. 

Amie Metcalf 221. 

Tillie Kemp 222. 

Exie Kemp 223. 

Sallie Johnson 224. 

Lulie Lee 225. 

Emma Wishart 226. 

Fannie Traeger 227. 

Endora Fletcher 228. 

Annie McCarty 229. 

Lou Happel 230. 

Bell Sariton 231. 

Delia Berghoeffer 232. 

Mary Berghoeffer 233. 

Katie Starke 234. 

Fannie Traeger 235. 
Emma Englehardt 236. 

Bettie Hoga 237. 

Jennie Lampkin 238. 

Jamie Longmire 239. 

Willie Thomas 240. 

Henry Heintze 241. 

"Willie Flanagan 242. 

Sammie Flanagan 243. 

Eliza Flanagan 244. 

Eddie Swartz 245. 

John Stacy 246. 

Alex Englehart 247. 

Eddie Theioff 248. 

Eddie Englehart 249. 

Dorcus Theioff 250. 

Johnie Noble 251. 

George Newlower 252. 

John Cliffmiller 253. 

Edie "Windsor 254. 
Willie Englehart 



Mrs. Eddie Brady 
Mrs. Willie Thomas 
Mrs. Granville Keller 
Mrs. Willie Roy 
Willie Curd 
Mrs. John Campbell 
Mrs. John Henritze 
Mrs. Henry Friedank 
Mrs. Georgie Friedank 
Mrs. Phillip Gantz 
Mrs. August Gantz 
Mrs. Augustus Himmel 
Mrs. John Thomas 
Mrs. John Shannon 
Mrs. Albert Sprague 
Mrs. Lafayette Trotter 
Mrs. Eddie McCamren 
Mrs. James Thomas 
Mrs. J. Q. A. Metcalf 
Mrs. Richard Tatlow 
Mrs. Frank Shannon 
Mrs. Silas Pittman 
Mrs. Eddie Anderson 
Mrs. John Snitzer 
Mrs. Albert Smith 
Mrs. John Foster 
Mrs. Willie Wishart 
Mrs. Robert Chandler 
Mrs. Christopher Brady 
Mrs. Willie Weidhas 
Mrs. Charlie Bowman 
Mrs. Charlie Trager 
Mrs. John Bowman 
Mrs. Theodore Hayden 
Mrs. Frank Swartz 
Mrs. James Watts 
Mrs. John Shaul 
Mrs. Henry Kratz 
Mrs. John Priest 
Mrs. D. Rush 
Mrs. John Painter 
Mrs. John Berghoeffer 
Mrs. Johnnie Lipscomb 
Mrs. Willie Windsor 
Mrs. Willie Brown 
Mrs. John Shannon, Jr 
Mrs. Lewis Hayden 
Mrs. Willie Longmire 
Mrs. Willie Arbogast 
Mrs. Tommie Yancey 
Mrs. J. W. Widderfield 
Mrs. H. K. Hinde 
Mrs. Thos. V. Winfree 
Mrs. Benjamin Hayden 
Mrs. George Milton 
Mrs. Benjamin Thomas 
Mrs. Lill Anderson 
Mrs. Thomas Priest 
Mrs. James Bowman 
Mrs. Eddie Longmire 
Mrs. Willie Berghoeffer 
Rev. J. McEwan 
Rev. L. R. Downing 
Rev. James Penn 
Rev. W. W. McMurry 
Rev. J. D. Vincil 
Rev. A. P. Lynn 
Rev. L. W. Rush 
Rev. W. M. Lettwich 
Rev. H. H. Hedgepeth 
Rev. William Rush. 
Rev. E. Mc K. Bounds 
Mr. Edward Thompson 
Rev. E. H. Hudson 
Rev. S. J. Huffaker 
Rev. R. P. Holt 
Rev. R. G. Loving 
Rev. Andrew Monroe 
Rev. Bishop Kavanaugh 
Mr. Jacob Sosey 
Rev. F. A. Savage 
Rev. Mr. Cox 
Rev. W. O. Cross 
Mr. Th. E. Thompson, 
Superintendent. 



330 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV. JOSEPH SIMPSON TODD, A. M. 



For he looked for a City which hath foundations, whose 
Builder and maker is God. — St. Paul. 



Rev. Joseph Simpson Todd was born in West Virginia October 31st, 1826. Both 
of his parents, William Todd and Mary E. Todd, were members of the Old School 
Presbyterian Church. When he was fourteen years old he joined the Old School 
Presbyterian Church, and united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in 1849. 
His mother had such a saving influence over him that he felt he was converted from 
infancy, but definitely and fully in February, 1848. His growth in grace was steady 
and continued from the time of his full conversion and call to preach. He was. 
licensed to preach by the Quarterly Conference of Columbia Circuit, Rev. Andrew 
Monroe presiding; the same Quarterly Conference recommended him to th Annual 
Conference for admission on trial; Rev. P. M. Pinkard, preacher in charge; he was 
received into the Annual Conference in 1850, at Canton, Rev. Andrew Monroe Presid- 
ing Elder and Bishop pro tern. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Paine, in October, 
1852; ordained Elder by Bishop Kavanaugh, in 1854, at Brunswick, Missouri. He has 
served the following charges: Richmond Circuit, Liberty Plattsburg, Weston,. 
Columbia, Clarksville and Paynesville, Lagrange, located in 18&7 r readmitted in 1873, 
and had charge of Clarence Circuit, Palmyra Circuit, Shelbyville High School and 
station, and readmitted same fall, 1873; Shelbyville Circuit, one year; Monroe City, 
two years; Monticello, two years; Shelbyville, two years; Hunnewell, two years; 
Hydesburgh, one year; Cairo, one year; Bloomington, one year; Palmyra Circuit, two 
years; Glasgow, one year; Rocheport, one year. Rev. J. Y. Blakey and Rev. W F. 
McMurry, D. D., were converted under his ministry and taken into the church at 
Shelbyville. Four churches were built under his pastorate. He attended and was 
graduated from Alexandria College, West Virginia. One year he had charge of the 
Shelbyville High School. He was a strong believer in Christian education and sent 
his sons to Central College, Fayette, Missouri. He was married to Miss Mary E. 
Miller, October 3d, 1858, and their children are Mary E. Todd, Edna Todd, Wallace 
Todd, Maggie Todd, Josephine Todd, Hugh Todd, Callie Todd and Charles Todd. 
All of his children are happily converted. Brother Todd was a clear thinker, a forcible 
speaker, and a preacher of the first class. His sermons were full of meat for the 
thoughtful. He has gone to his eternal reward on high. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



331 




REV SAMUEL HAYMAN WAINRIGHT, M.D., D.D. 



The waves of Infinite Love, agitated by the Death-pain of Jesus, 
May wash all the shores of Eternity and of Being. 

— Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. Samuel Hayman Wainwright was born April 15th, 1863, at Columbus, Illinois. 
He is a son of Rev. Daniel Thomas Wainwright and Amanda F. Wainwright. His 
father was a preacher in the Missouri Conference and his mother also a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Brother Samuel H. Wainright joined the 
church in childhood, at Monticello, Missouri, and afterwards united with the church 
in Shelbyville, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. J. M. O'Bryen. His conversion was 
in direct answer to the earnest prayers of a sister. At the very hour when the decision 
was made this devoted sister at a distant place was on her knees making intercession 
for him. Dr. Wainwright has grown in the deep things of God. His hold on divine 
things is remarkable and his steadfast Christian life naturally follows. He was 
licensed to preach in Kobe, Japan, and the Quarterly Conference of Kobe recommended 
him to the Annual Conference for admission on trial in August, 1894; and was ordained 
Deacon and Elder by Bishop Wilson, also at Kobe, in August, 1898. For eighteen 
years Dr. Wainwright was head of the Methodist College for Boys at Kobe, Japan, 
called the Kwansei Gakuin. He finished the common and high schools and was grad- 
uated from the Missouri Medical College of St. Louis, and received the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from Central College. He was married to Miss Margaret M. 
Todd, December 30th, 1886, and they have three children, Daniel Todd Wainwright, 
Samuel Hayman Wainwright and Elizabeth Agee Wainwright. He considers the 
decision to go to the foreign field in 1888 as possibly the most important crisis in his 
life. Dr. Wainwright has been a great student and a close reader of many books, 
both Japanese and English. Philosophy has been his favorite subject, aside from the 
Bible, which he studies daily in the original. Dr. Wainwright is more than a reader 
of books. He is a profound and reasonable thinker. His sermons are strong and help- 
ful. He has been elected President of the Japan Annual Conference twice, and three 
times delegate to the General Conference. Such a man gives substantial influence to 
the Foreign Missionary enterprise. 



332 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV AMBROSE PRESTON LINN. 



What shares our suffering is to share our glory. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. Ambrose Preston Linn was born in Virginia, August 26th, 1833, and came 
to Missouri at the age of sixteen years. Soon afterwards he was converted and began 
regular work in the church at about the age of eighteen. His conversion was clear 
and satisfactory. The fruits of it remained to the end. He made steady growth in 
grace and exercised his love and faith in many gracious revivals of religion. By this 
means he grew to the full stature of a man in Christ Jesus. He was received into 
the Annual Conference for admission on trial in 1851, at Fayette, Missouri, Bishop 
Capers presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Andrew in 1853 at Palmyra, 
Missouri; was ordained Elder by Bishop Early in 1855 at Richmond, Missouri. He 
served the following appointments: Clarksville and Paynesville Circuits, Fulton, 
Lagrange, Edina, Louisiana, Lagrange, Huntsville, and Chillicothe, Southwest Missouri- 
Conference at Nevada, Wentzville, Monroe City, Clarence and Hydesburg. He received 
hundreds into the church. In fact, he was a great revivalist, and his harvest of souls 
was great. The church at Huntsville was built under his pastorate. He was twice 
married, first to Miss Mary J. Glasscock, who died in July, 1863, and he was again mar- 
ried to Miss Anna E. Martin January 11th, 1866, who now survives him. The names 
of his children are Edwin M. Linn, Harry E. Linn, Paul H. Linn and Nellie M. Linn. 
He lead the hosts of Israel in many a hard-fought battle and by the help of the 
Lord he won the day. He was a fine singer and was a member of the Palmyra meet- 
ing that determined the future of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in this State. 
He was a powerful revivalist and in great demand for meetings, preaching much at 
camp-grounds. He died at Monroe City, Missouri, June 10th, 1885. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



333 



REV THOMAS DEMOSS. 



He came to his grave in full character, in full preparedness, 
Meet for the Master's use. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Rev. Thomas DeMoss, born 
May the 14th, 1813, died at 
Monroe City, Mo., November 23, 
1876, in the sixty-fourth year of 
his life. His ancestors, an old 
French family, sought refuge in 
this country, on the breaking 
out of the French Revolution 
in the latter part of the 
eighteenth century, and settled 
on the Ohio River in Campbell 
County, Kentucky. The father 
of the subject of this sketch 
never identified himself with 
any religious order, but his 
mother, a native of Kentucky, 
was converted in early life and 
united with the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. She left the im- 
press of her Christian char- 
acter on her children, two of 
whom were Methodist preachers. 
Educational facilities at that 
day in Kentucky were meager, 
and young DeMoss acquired 
only such education as the coun- 
try schools and a few terms at 
the Brooksville Academy, an 
educational enterprise main- 
tained at the metropolis of his 
native country, could furnish. 
On this rudimental foundation, 
with an attentive mind and 
studious habits he was enabled 
to keep abreast of the times in 
after-life on general informa- 
tion. In his seventeenth year 
he was converted and united 
with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and two years later was licensed to preach. At 
the annual session of the Kentucky Conference in 1834 he applied for admission and 
an examination was admitted and assigned work. He maintained that relation six- 
teen years, filling various stations and charges in connection therewith. At the an- 
nual session of the Conference in 1836 he was ordained a Deacon and subsequently 
received the order of Elder, but by whom these orders were conferred this writer 
cannot now recall. 

During the eventful session of the Kentucky Conference in 1844 he aligned with 
the party of the South and assisted in adjusting the affairs of the Church to the 
new order of things, occasioned by the division of the Church. He was an able and 
zealous expounder of the doctrine of the Church. Many men and women were con- 
verted under his ministry, who subsequently became useful and influential members 
of the Methodist Church. 

In the autumn of 1855 he removed with his family to Missouri, with the inten- 
tion of engaging in agricultural pursuits. Providence, however, ordained otherwise. 
At the session of the Missouri Conference, held at Hannibal in 1856, he again entered 
the itineracy and continued to serve the Church in that capacity for twenty-one years. 
His first charge was at Hannibal and the last at Edina in Knox County. 

Early in his ministry he was married to Katherine Richards, an amiable Christian 
woman, well-fitted by disposition and culture to become the companion and solace of 
an itinerant Methodist minister. She survived her husband many years and died at 
the home of her daughter, near Glasgow, in 1898, and was gathered to her fathers. 
This memorial page has been furnished by Mr. J. M. DeMoss, a son of the deceased. 




334 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV HENRY BASCOM WATSON. 

Born, April 21, 1838. Died, February 14, 1889. 

But they shall nourish from the tomb, 

The breath of God shall wake them into odorous bloom. - 



-Keble. 



By Rev. Edgar D. Watson, A. M. 

His father, David Watson, a 
native of York District, South 
Carolina, settled near the pres- 
ent site of Louisiana, Missouri, 
in 1810, and there resided till 
his death, November 23, 1860. 
His mother, Mary Neville Ed- 
munds, a native of Virginia, 
lived with her mother near 
Clarksville, Missouri, where she 
was married to David Watson, 
July 3, 1834. Henry Bascom 
was born at the old homestead 
near Louisiana, Missouri, April 
21, 1838, and there grew to man- 
hood. Both parents were deeply 
religious, and loyal and devoted 
Methodists, and the son was 
thoroughly trained in religious 
matters. He united with the 
church when but twelve years 
old. Convinced of his call to 
the ministry, he attended school 
at Louisiana, St. Charles Col- 
lege, Howard High School (Cen- 
tral at Fayette), and Wesleyan 
University, Middleton, Connecti- 
cut. He was licensed to preach 
and recommended for admission 
into the Missouri Conference by 
the Louisiana Quarterly Confer- 
ence in 1858, Rev. B. H. Spencer 
P. C, and Rev. A. Monroe, 
Presiding Elder. He was re- 
ceived at St. Joseph, September, 
1859, Bishop Paine, presiding. 
He was appointed as follows: 
Junior preacher, Danville Cir- 
cuit; Rev. J. W Cook, P. C, 1859; P. C, Danville Circuit, 1860; Junior Preacher, St. 
Charles Circuit; Rev. Tyson Dines, P. C, 1861-1862; Junior Preacher, Bloomington 
and Kirksville; Rev. W. Toole, P. C, 1863; located in 1864 to look after his mother's 
affairs. No Bishop being present he had never been ordained. He was married 
October 6, 1864, to Miss Gertrude Moore, of Fairfax County, Virginia. Their children 
are: Edgar David Watson, of the Missouri Conference; Minnie (deceased); Cora 
Campbell Watson, Palmyra, Missouri; Maud (deceased); Mary Gertrude Bailey, 
Palmyra, Missouri; H. Bascom Watson (deceased); Henry B. Watson (deceased); 
Mrs. Gertrude Watson is living at Palmyra. After residing a year at St. Charles he 
went to Bolivar, where he engaged in teaching, afterwards being admitted to the bar. 
Here his mother died and he at once sacrificed everything to re-enter the Missouri 
Conference, and he was re-admitted at Glasgow, October 7, 1875. He was ordained 
Deacon September 16, and Elder, Sepptember 17, 1876, at Hannibal by Bishop 
McTyeire. His appointments were as follows: Shelbina, 1875-1876; Hannibal, Fifth 
Street (Park), 1878-1879; Columbia, 1880-1881; Sturgeon, 1882; Glasgow, 1883, 1884, 
1885; Pueblo, Colorado (Denver Conference), 1886; Shelbina Circuit, 1887; Shelbina 
Station, 1888. 

The work he accomplished, the power he manifested, and the indomitable pur- 
pose he revealed were astonishing to all who knew the suffering he endured. Even 
in his hours of extremest weakness and misery, which would have made most men 
helpless, his preaching was "in demonstration of the Spirit and of power." He 
was ready to go. "It is all right. He knows best. God makes no mistakes.," were 
among his last words, as he fell asleep. He was beloved by all who knew him, and 
his memory is precious. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 335 



REV- J. S. FRAZIER. 



Loving God, I am happy; living in God, I am safe. — Dr. Joseph 
Parker. 



By Rev. Fielding Marvin, D. D. 

Rev. J. S. Frazier was born in Davidson County, Tennessee, May 24th, 1838. 
While yet a mere youth he came with his parents to Missouri. While living with 
an uncle in Cape Girardeau County he was converted under the ministry of Rev. 
Samuel Huffman. At the old McKendree Chapel, the first Methodist church erected in 
Southeast Missouri, his conversion occurred. Brother Frazier joined the St. Louis 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in the fall of 1864, having 
done some ministerial work as a supply before his admission into the Conference. At 
this Conference he was ordained local Deacon by Bishop Kavanaugh. In 1868 he was 
ordained Elder by Bishop Marvin. His first regular appointment was Fredericktown, 
and during this year there were, under his ministry, one hundred and forty conversions. 
From that time to his superannuation, Brother Frazier's ministry was a successful 
one. Hundreds were brought into the light and received into the church, and in 
the pastoral work and in the work of starting church-building and parsonage-build- 
ing enterprises this man took an active part. He served also the following charges: 
Springfield, New Madrid, St. James, Rolla, Merrimac, Kirkwood, Manchester, Bridge- 
ton, Charleston and Charleston District. After serving Charleston District three 
years he was transferred to the Missouri Conference. Here he served O'Fallon and 
Cottleville, Liberty, Palmyra, Huntsville, Louisiana, Canton, Hunnewell Circuit, Bowling 
Green Circuit and Troy. While at Troy, his health failing, he took superannuated 
relation. 

Some of the trying experiences of the Civil War fell to the lot of this Southern 
Methodist preacher, experiences such as many preachers had in Missouri, for he 
labored during the times of the test oath administration, and preached at the peril 
of arrest and imprisonment. But the Supreme Court of the United States after a while 
pronounced such legislation unconstitutional and our hitherto hampered and harrassed 
preachers could proclaim without restraint the glad news of salvation to men. 

Brother Frazier's ministry has extended almost over the entire state and his name 
is known and honored in all the Conferences of Missouri. It is refreshing to hear him 
talk of Kavanaugh and Pierce, of Doggett, Wightman and Keener and other leaders 
of a generation that has passed away. 

He is a large minded true preacher of the gospel. Repentance and faith and 
forgiveness he offers to sinners, all in the name of Christ. 

Brother Frazier is ever ready by word and work to serve the Master. Though 
superannuated he is not idle. The interests of the church are still upon his heart 
and though physical strength is not so great as in earlier years, yet the freshness and 
vigor of his prayers and sermons are truly uplifting, and the testimony of his faith 
and love gives courage and strength to the church. 



336 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV ENOCH KIRBY MILLER, D. D. 



On life's fair tree fast by the throne of God, 

What golden joys ambrosial clustering glow 

In His full beam, and ripen for the just. — Young. 



Rev. Enoch Kirby Miller, son of Samuel Miller and Sarah Miller, was born near 
Palmyra, Missouri, October 3rd, 1829. He was converted while teaching school in his 
eighteenth year, under the ministry of Rev. B. H. Spencer. About two years later 
he was married to Miss Pyrena Maupin, who lived only a short time thereafter. He 
then resolved to obey his convictions to enter the ministry. Accordingly he was 
licensed to preach at a Quarterly Conference of Paris Circuit, at Spencer's Chapel, 
May, 1851, Rev. Jacob Lanius, Presiding Elder. One week later he was admitted 
into the traveling connection of the Missouri Conference at Fayette, Missouri, and 
was appointed to Columbia Circuit as junior preacher. The next two years he was 
on the Edina Circuit, and during that time he was married to Miss Virginia Maynard. 
In 1854-1855, he served Canton charge, the next year at Shelbyville, then St. Joseph, 
Station two years, where he built old Francis Street Church. Here his second wife 
died, leaving two small children, the elder one, Mr. Andrew Miller, of Springfield, 
Missouri, still lives; the younger son dying in childhood. The year 1858-1859 he was 
Presiding Elder of Savannah District; the next two years he was stationed at Han- 
nibal, where he was married to Miss Anna Green, of New York, who only lived a 
short while. From Hannibal he was sent to Chillicothe Station. In 1862 he, in com- 
pany with Rev. Enoch M. Marvin, started to the General Conference at New Orleans, 
but when they reached Batesville, Arkansas, they learned the Conference had been 
postponed. On his return he was arrested by the State Militia and thrown into 
prison, and remained a prisoner until the last of January, 1863. In 1864 he was trans- 
ferred to the Pacific Conference, where he served Sacramento two years; San Fran- 
cisco, two years; Sacramento District, four years; San Jose, two years; Colusa, four 
years; then transferred back to the Missouri Conference in 1878, and pastor of 
Francis Street Church, at St. Joseph, Missouri, four years; Columbia Station, two 
years; Park Church, Hannibal, two years; Mexico Station, four years; Presiding 
Elder, Fayette District, four years; Mexico District, two years; Plattesburg District, 
three years; Hannibal District, four years; he was then superannuated. The man- 
ner of his death was beautiful; the messenger came to him suddenly and apparently 
without pain. The finger of death touched him while sitting alone in his room 
looking out of the window upon the world mantled with snow, as the evening sun was 
-closing the day — fit close of so beautiful a life. Dr. Miller was married to Miss Lucy 
H. Jones, in San Francisco, May 12th, 1868. For thirty-six years they journeyed 
together. Their only child, Mrs. Mary Crider, with her two children, survives to share 
the mother's sorrow. Dr. Miller was a genial, Christian gentleman, modest but courtly 
in all his bearings. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE—HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



337 




REV. FRANCIS ASBURY TAYLOR, A.M. 



Thought, too, delivered, is the more possessed; 
Teaching we learn; and giving we retain. — Young. 



Francis Aubry Taylor, son of John J. and Mary E. Taylor, was born in Shelby 
County, Missouri, September 12, 1842. His parents were natives of Virginia and 
came to Missouri in 1839. He was converted at the age of twelve years and joined 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. His early education was obtained at Shelby 
High School, and he graduated with honor at Illinois College, taking the degree of 
A. B. and A. M. After graduating he returned to his native State and taught one 
year in Palmyra Seminary. Then he taught four years in Central College at Fay- 
ette, Missouri. After teaching about ten years he joined the Southwest Missouri 
Conference, having been licensed to preach in 1870. After preaching four years his 
health failed, and he came to Florida in 1881. His health having improved, he 
edited the "Citizen" at Apopka for three years. In 1889 he was elected professor of 
Mathematics and Greek in the Florida Conference College at Leesburg, where he 
remained seven years. He returned to the itinerant work in 1897 in the Florida Con- 
ference. He has served Callahan, High Springs, Waldo, Bowling Green and Maitland 
Circuits. He was twice married, and has a wife and four living children, two daughters 
and two sons. 

Brother Frank Taylor was teaching in Shelbyville High School, when the writer 
first knew him. He was then associated with Rev. W W. McMurry, who took great 
interest in educational matters. Among the many men of noble character who have 
helped to make Central College at Fayette stands the name of Rev. Francis Asbury 
Taylor. 



338 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JOHN JEFFERSON REED. 



All that was lying frozen at my heart thou hast melted, 
And put in motion. — Goethe. 

Rev. John Jefferson Reed, son 
of Robert Stephenson Reed and 
Sarah Jane Reed, was born in 
Marshall County, Mississippi, 
March 5th, 1858. Both of his. 
parents were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He was converted in 
the fall of 1867, in a revival' 
meeting held in Douglas County,, 
Missouri, while visiting an uncle, 
but did not join the church until 
September 3rd, 1882, under the 
ministry of Rev. J. G. L. Mitch- 
ell. Being but a boy, nine yeara 
old, under the preaching of the 
Word in this meeting, he felt for 
the first time in his life the real 
need of salvation. He had been 
properly taught from childhood, 
but now felt the need of a per- 
sonal, conscious salvation. As 
soon as the invitation was given 
for penitents to come forward, 
he hastened to the altar and re- 
ceived the blessing of salvation. 
The experience of salvation has 
grown sweeter and better to him 
as the years have passed along; 
a salvation that is genuine, yet 
grows richer. God's promises 
are more precious, and his con- 
fidence in them, and in Him who 
made them, deepens and widens. 
He is growing in grace and in 
the knowledge of things heaven- 
ly. His love for all men is man- 
ifested in the life he is living 
and the work he is trying to do 
to save them. He was licensed 
to preach just two weeks after he joined the church; Rev. J. G. L. Mitchell was 
pastor, and Rev. Joseph King was Presiding Elder; was recommended to the Annual 
Conference for admission on trial by the same Quarterly Conference, the Quarterly 
Conference of the Henderson Circuit, September 3rd, 1883; was received into the 
Southwest Missouri Annual Conference at Boonville, September 26th, 1883; Rev. 
Joseph King, Presiding Elder, and Bishop A. W. Wilson, presiding; was received into 
full connection in the Conference at Lexington, October 3rd, 1885; ordained Deacon 
by Bishop John C. Granbery, at Lexington, Missouri, October 4th, 1885; ordained 
Elder by Bishop E. R. Hendrix at Springfield, Missouri, October 2nd, 1887. Appoint- 
ments served: Southwest Missouri Conference, Ozark Circuit, 1883-1885; Marshfield 
Circuit, 1885-1886; Springfield Circuit, 1886-1888; Willard Circuit, 1888-1889; Bolivar 
Circuit, 1889-1891; Morrisville Station, 1891-1893; Blue Springs Circuit, 1893-1895; 
Carterville Station, 1895-1896; Newtonia Circuit, 1896-1898; Sheldon Circuit, 1898- 
1901; Missouri Conference, LaBelle Circuit, 1901-1904; Shelbyville Circuit, 1904, to 
present. Eight hundred and twenty-seven persons have been received into the church 
during the term of his ministry. The church at Stella, Ozark, Aldrich, and the one 
at Williamstown were all built during his pastorat at those several places. His edu- 
cation was received at the public schools, Henderson Academy and Mountain Dale 
Seminary. He was married February 21st, 1883, to Miss Susie Edwards, who died 
February 17th, 1892; of this marriage the following children were born: Clarence 
Eugene Reed, Charley Robert Reed, Sarah Iva Reed and Nellie May Reed. He was 
married September 18th, 1893, to Miss Sarah Antine Appleby, and they have the 
following named children : Nora Appleby Reed, who died during infancy, Zula Belle 
Reed and John Paul Reed. He considers the most important crisis in his life, first, 
when he gave his heart to God, and second when he gave up all ambitions for other 
things and devoted himself to the ministry. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



339 




MR. JOHN J. HEWITT. 



Then thy Master wrought 

Better than Buddh, slewing the world beyond 
Where men shall find their treasurers of good works 
Laid up on trust, awaiting; loss made gain. — Arnold. 

The parents of the subject of this sketch, Samuel M. Hewitt and Caroline Hewitt, 
came to Missouri from Kentucky in 1835. Samuel M. Hewitt was a member of the 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and Caroline Hewitt, his wife, a member of the 
Methodist Church, South. Mr. John J. Hewitt was born in 1848, in Shelby County, 
Missouri, and was baptized in infancy. He was converted and joined the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, in 1877; Rev. Lilburn Rush was his pastor. He has been 
a regular attendant of the Sunday School and church from childhood and continues 
to be at the present time. He came to Shelbyville in 1880. He married Miss Lillian 
Turner, daughter of Mr. Holman Turner, in 1881. Mrs. Hewitt joined the church 
at the age of eleven in 1870. They have four children, Esta, John V., Floyd and 
Cresap. Esta married Mr. R. L. Dimmitt and she and John V. both reside now 
in Birmingham, Ala. John V. Hewitt is a teacher in the Birmingham High School. 
Mr. John J. Hewitt engaged in the mercantile business in Shelbyville in 1880. He 
was elected President of the Citizens' Bank in 1894, which position he now holds. 
He was elected Superintendent of the Sunday School in Shelbyville in 1881, and this 
position he now fills. The Sunday School and church have been a great means of 
grace to him; the Lord has graciously blessed him both temporally and SP] 1 " 1 ^ 1 ^ 1 ^' 
and as he grows in years he wants to partake more and more of spiritual food, the 
Word of God, that he may grow in the Grace and knowledge of our Lord and Master. 
Brother Hewitt has won an honorable place in the banking world, and his name stands 
for integrity. He has given his children a good education and they are an honor to 
their parents. As Sunday School Superintendent, he has given his influence in favor 
of world-wide missions. It is easy to count him a friend and brother. 



340 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- JOHN MOREHEAD O'BRYEN. 



I contemplate Christ and His work, and worship God with a 
Deeper joy. — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. John Morehead O'Bryen 
was born July 6th, 1843, in 
Randolph County, North Caro- 
lina. He is a son of Myal 
O'Bryen and Jane O'Bryen. 
Both parents belonged to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He was converted in 
1857, at Prospect Church, in 
Randolph County, North Caro- 
lina, under the ministry of Rev. 
Thos. H. Guthrie and Rev. D. 
Johnson, and joined the church 
at the same time and place. He 
had been trained by religious 
parents and was converted the 
first time he went forward to the 
mourner's bench for prayers. It 
was ten years before he began to 
grow in grace and to be finally 
fixed in his purpose to serve 
God. Since 1866, he has steadily 
grown in the knowledge and love 
of God. He was made perfect 
in love, after seeking that bless- 
ing by faith in the Son of God. 
He was licensed to preach by 
the Quarterly Conference of 
Auburn Circuit, February 19th, 
1870; Rev. Andrew Monroe, 
Presiding Elder. He was recom- 
mended to the Annual Confer- 
ence by the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of the Old Alexandria Cir- 
cuit, August 17th, 1872; he was 
received into the Annual Con- 
ference at Mexico, Missouri, in 
1872; Rev. W. E. Dockery, Pre- 
siding Elder, and Bishop Pierce, presiding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop J. C. 
Keener, September 20th, 1874, at St. Joseph, Missouri; was ordained Elder by Bishop 
H. N. McTyeire, September 17th, 1876, at Hannibal, Missouri. He has served the 
following appointments: Auburn Circuit, 1872-1873; Wright City Circuit, 1874-1876; 
Jonesburg Circuit, 1877-1878; Clarksville Circuit, 1879-1882; Shelbyville Circuit, 
1883-1886; Shelbina Station, 1887; Plattsburg District, 1888-1892; St. Joseph District, 
Chillicothe Station, and Shelbyville. He has received more than one thousand persons 
into the church under his ministry. Under his pastorate Ellsberry Church and O'Bryen 
Chapel were built, and the Clarksville Church and Bacon Chapel were remodeled, and 
the parsonage at Shelbyville built. He received his education in the public schools 
and at Trinity College, North Carolina. Brother O'Bryen has been twice married, the 
first time to Miss Serena Hall, November 29th, 1870, and on October 9th, 1877, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Mary E. Ballard. The names of his children are as 
follows: Enoch M. O'Bryen, Joseph L. O'Bryen, William W. O'Bryen, Lelia Carey 
O'Bryen, Paul O'Bryen, Seney H. O'Bryen, Dora W. O'Bryen, Samuel D. O'Bryen, 
Lydia M. O'Bryen, Willard R. O'Bryen and Pinkley O'Bryen. Two books which have 
been specially helpful to him, aside from the Bible, are Bishop Foster's "Beyond the 
Grave," and Bickersteth's "Yesterday, Today and Forever." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



341 



MR. PRINCE DIMMITT. 



Virtue, not rolling suns, the mind matures; 

That life is long which answers life's great end. — Young. 



Prince Dimmitt, son of Dr. 
P, F. and Caroline F. Dimmitt, 
was born July 30th, 1860, in 
Cooper County, Missouri. When 
but six months old he moved 
with his parents to Shelby 
County, Missouri, where he has 
since resided. He was educated 
in the old Shelbyville High 
School in Shelbyville, Missouri; 
he entered this school in 1868, 
when Rev. John W. Adkisson 
was principal. In 1878, when 
but eighteen years old, his 
brother Frank and he took 
charge of his father's farm. In 
1881 he was married to Miss 
Cora E. Schofield, of Palmyra, 
Missouri; seven children were 
born of this marriage. Nora 
Lee (now Mrs. Quisenberry, of 
Gallatin, Missouri), Edith Bell, 
Cora Leta, Eula Schofield, Wil- 
liam Philip Ellis, Prince Harold 
and Fannie Agee Dimmitt. 
Being a strong advocate of 
Christian education, he has edu- 
cated his girls in Howard-Payne 
College and also patronized Cen- 
tral College, Fayette, Missouri. 
He continued to live on the farm 
until 1897, when he moved to 
Shelbyville, Missouri, and in 
February, the following year, 
was elected president of the 
Shelbyville Bank, a position 
which he now holds. He was 
converted in the old Methodist 

church at Shelbyville in February, 1887, under the ministry of Rev. J. M. O'Bryen and 
was received by him a few weeks later into the church at Duncan Chapel, where his 
membership still remains. His conversion was clear and distinct, attested by the 
work of the Spirit, and he has rejoiced along the way. His father and mother were 
both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and taught him from his 
childhood to reverence the Sabbath day and to attend Sunday School and church ser- 
vices. In regard to the books that have helped him most, aside from the Bible, he has 
read the sermons of Bishop Marvin, George and Lovick Pierce, Bishop Soule, Thomas 
0. Summers, Doggett, McTyeire and others, which have been very helpful to him, 
but he has derived more special benefit in trying to perform his Christian duties. He 
has been a teacher in the Sunday School for more than fifteen years, and during this 
time he has had charge of but two classes, and whatever good that is in his life, he is 
certain that the association from Sabbath to Sabbath with these two classes of young 
Christian women has been instrumental in bringing it about. Then he has derived 
special blessings in ministering to the sick and suffering. It has always been the 
joy and delight of his life to help the best he could those who were suffering^ He 
would say, "Let duty be our law in life, our watchword at the gate of death, and 
we are certain of the promised reward. He feels that when this frail bark is finally 
loosened from its moorings, that his faith will tower above the wreck, and he shall 
be safely anchored on the other side. , 

Mr. Dimmitt is the writer's school mate and friend, and it is a pleasure to record 
this account of true worth. He is a banker of first-class standing, and he has a tine 
family. 




3+2 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV ROBERT WHITE. 



So long thy power hath blest me, sure it still will lead me on. 
— John Henry Newman. 



By Rev. A. B. Culbertson, A. M. 

Rev. Robert White has had such an eventful and useful career that a brief 
sketch will only hint at what has been done. 

He was born in Australia, March 8th, 1842. When fifteen years old he went 
to England, and there the Spirit of God convicted him of sin. On the 9th day of 
February, 1857, this same Spirit converted his soul, and he at once joined the Meth- 
odist church. At the age of nineteen he was preaching. He came to the United 
States in the year 1872, and was received by the Annual Conference at Mexico, Missouri, 
in Elders' Orders from the Wesleyan Methodist Conference of England. From that 
day to the present he has been doing faithful work as an itinerant in the country, 
church, and Conference of his adoption. 

He has served the following charges in the Missouri Annual Conference: Salis- 
bury, Ashland, Rocheport, Sturgeon, Maryville, Tenth Street, St. Joseph, Plattsburg, 
Shelbina, Chillicothe, Moberly, Louisiana, Paris, St. Charles District, four years on 
the Rocheport Circuit; Hunnewell. Three of these appointments he served four 
years; three, three years; five of them two years, and three of them one year. 

He is truly a "fisher of men." When he has once served a people they never forget 
him. Their hearts are knit to him. His most distinguished gift is evangelistic. His 
power to so present gospel truth that it can be easily comprehended and relished is 
worthy of special note. His greatest meetings have been held on his own works where 
at times more than one hundred souls have professed faith in Christ in a single 
meeting. When his bow ceases to abide in its strength the church will lose a faithful 
servant and successful laborer. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



343 




REV JOHN R. TAYLOR. 



The noble love of Jesus impels a man to do great things, and 
Stirs him up to be always longing for what is more perfect. 
— Thomas A Kempis. 



John R. Taylor was born January 24, 1838, in Hampshire County, Virginia, and 
was born again in 1851 in Missouri, and united with the Southern Methodists the 
same year. He was licensed to preach in August, 1858, and in the following Sep- 
tember was admitted on trial in the Missouri Conference. After a quarter of a century 
of continued service in the itinerancy he was transferred to the Florida Conference, 
in 1883, where he has served circuits and missions for over twenty years. He loves 
the polity and doctrines of the Southern Methodist Church and delights to preach 
and defend them. He is endeavoring to be diligent in duty, and wants to declare the 
whole council of God, and considers it a great privilege to preach a whole gospel 
and proclaim free and full salvation through a perfect Saviour. His motto is: "Holi- 
ness unto the Lord, and loyalty to God and His Church." Most of those who entered 
the campaign when he did have crossed over the river and are resting with God. 
Brother Taylor hopes to finish his course with joy, and be ready to join his old 
comrades on the other bright shore. 

Brother Taylor has been in the itinerant ranks for forty-eight years, and he is 
not tired of the service. He is a class-mate of the late and lamented Rev. W. W. 
McMurry. He belongs to that immortal group of Shelby County preachers, and he 
has never discredited his lineage. He desires to be remembered kindly to all the 
brethren of Missouri. 



344 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV ROBERT W. HOWERTON. 



Et ministros suos ignis flammam. 

And his ministers a flame of fire. — St. Paul. 



Rev. Robert W. Howerton, son 
of Joseph H. Howerton and 
Martha A. Howerton, was born 
in 1848, in Chariton County, 
Missouri, near Brunswick. Both 
parents were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He was converted at 
the old Prairie Chapel church 
in Chariton County, under the 
ministry of Rev. Wm. Penn. His 
conversion was clear and full; 
he was alone in the woods at 
prayer when the evidence of the 
Spirit came; everything was 
calm and it was like the passing 
away of a dark shadow and the 
breaking in upon his soul of the 
light, beauty and warmth of the 
sun. He was impressed early in 
his ministry with the necessity 
of a deeper religion, and sought 
it and found it, and he has 
grown in grace from the second 
year of his work as a minister; 
as he grows older his faith has 
grown stronger, and he no long- 
er walks by sight, but by faith. 
He was licensed to preach in 
the spring of 1873, by the Quar- 
terly Conference of Keytesville, 
Missouri, Rev. B. F. Johnson, 
preacher in charge, and Rev. S. 
W. Cope, Presiding Elder; rec- 
ommended to the Annual Con- 
ference for admisison on trial 
by the same Quarterly Confer- 
ence in the fall of 1873; Rev. 
S. W. Cope, Presiding Elder, and was received into the Annual Conference on trial 
in 1873; Rev. S. W Cope, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Keener, presiding at the 
Conference, which was held at St. Joseph, Missouri; ordained Deacon by Bishop 
Marvin in 1877, at Fulton, Missouri, ordained Elder by Bishop Wightman in 1879, 
at Louisiana, Missouri. Appointments filled are: Meadville Circuit, two years; Milan 
Circuit, two years; Lineville Circuit, one year; Platte City, three years; Gosneyville, 
one year; New Market, one year; Osborn, two years; Dearborn, four years; St. 
Joseph, two years; Cowgill, two years; Lawson and Excelsior Springs, two years; 
Prairie Hill, two years; Readsville, one year; Cedar City, two years: Vandalia, one 
year; was supernumerary one year; Troy Circuit, two years; Florida Circuit, two 
years; Stewartsville, one year. During the thirty-five years of his ministry he has 
received about two thousand persons into the church. He built the church at Milan, 
Missouri, one at Agency, Missouri, one at Ebenezer, one at Wallace and Dearborn, 
one at Prairie Hill, and one at Wainright, Missouri, and built a parson- 
age at Gosneyville and one at Cowgill. He obtained his education at the District 
schools. He was married to Miss Adelia Smith, December 10th, 1873, and their 
children are: Clarence Joseph, Claudius, Wilhelmina, Mary Alpha, Willie H., Hugh 
L., Ruth A., Robert F., and Paul Malcolm. He considers his entrance upon the 
great work of the ministry as possibly the most important crisis in his life. Some 
of the books that have proven very helpful to him, aside from the Bible, are "Pilgrim's 
Progress," "Life of John Wesley," and "Whitehead's Life of Wesley." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



345 




: 



REV- JOHN IRA SEARS, A. M. 



A man that is young in years may be old in hours, if he have 
Lost no time. — Bacon. 



Rev. John Ira Sears, son of Arthur E. Sears and Anna E. Sears, was born near 
Milan, Missouri, February 14th, 1877; both parents were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He was converted in March, 1894, under the ministry of 
Rev. J. R. Kincaid and joined the church during that same meeting. For a long 
time he had felt the burden of his sins, and one night went forward, and throwing 
himself down at the altar, his soul in agony, in a short time, he felt the peace of 
God in his heart and rejoiced in his saving grace. He has been growing in grace 
since that good day, and has striven to go always forward, and today is stronger and 
happier than ever before. He was licensed to preach in April. 1899, at Clifton Hill, 
Missouri, by the Fayette District Conference; Rev. G. M. Gibson was preacher in 
charge and Dr. John Anderson Presiding Elder. 



346 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV ORLANDO B. HOLLIDAY. 



The men who have most absolutely loved Christ have been also 
The men who have most truly loved all men and the whole of 
Man. — Dr. Fairbairn. 



Dr. Orlando B. Holliday, son of the Rev. R. N. T. Holliday and Sophia F. Holli- 
day, was born May 9th, 1860, at Stewartsville, Missouri. He was converted October 
18th, 1885, at Carrollton, Missouri, under the ministry of Rev. D. M. Proctor, and joined 
the church at the same time and place. His conversion was of the old type, clear, 
conscious and joyous. He loves the service of the Lord more today than ever before. 
He was licensed to preach December 12th, 1885, by the Quarterly Conference of Car- 
rollton; Rev. D. M. Proctor, pastor, and Rev. John Anderson, D. D., Presiding Elder. 
He was recommended to the Annual Conference for admission on trial by the same 
Quarterly Conference at Carrollton, Missouri, in July, 1886; and was received into 
the Annual Conference on trial in 1886; Rev. John Anderson, D. D., Presiding Elder, 
and Bishop H. N. McTyeire, presiding; ordained Deacon by Bishop E. R. Hendrix, 
at Gallatin, Missouri, in September, 1888: ordained Elder by Bishop J. S. Key, in 
September, 1890, at Fayette, Missouri. He has served the following appointments: 
Troy and Wentzville; Bowling Green; Edina; Kirksville; Shelbyville; Monroe City; 
Palmyra; Macon District; Hannibal District; he is now at Albuquerque, New Mexico. 
The Kirksville church was rebuilt and a large parsonage debt paid, the church at Shel- 
byville built and a large debt on the Monroe City parsonage paid under his pastorate, 
and they are now finishing a new parsonage at Albuquerque. His education was re- 
ceived at St. Charles College. He was married to Miss Lizzie Lee, March 9th, 1887, 
and they have four children, Minnielee, Robert C, Frances and Florence Virginia Hol- 
liday. After his conversion, his yielding to the call to preach the Gospel has been the 
most important crisis in his life. Brother Holliday is a man of fine executive ability, 
and his record of success on the Hannibal District, as in other places, is all in 
his favor. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



347 




Wmmm 






*7j 




REV GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS LEHNOFF, 



Perfection is being', not doing; it is not to effect an act, 
But to achieve a Character. — Dr. Frederick W Robertson. 



Rev. Gustavus Adolphus Lehnhoff was born January 29th, 1868, at St. Charles, 
Missouri. He is the son of William H. Lehnhoff and Charlotte Lehnhoff, Methodists. 
He began his education in the public schools of St. Charles and later of Chariton 
County. When a young man he entered Central College at Fayette, in September, 1892, 
and continued without interruption until June, 1896. He was converted at Little 
Hill Church in Chariton County in a meeting conducted by Rev. H. P. Bond in Decem- 
ber, 1886, and united with the German Methodist Church. In February, 1892, he 
transferred his membership to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, under the min- 
istry of Rev. M. L. Gray. He was licensed to preach by the Quarterly Conference of 
Salisbury Circuit, March 28th, 1892, Dr. E. K. Miller, Presiding Elder. He was admit- 
ted on trial into the Missouri Annual Conference, which met in Hannibal, Missouri, 
in September, 1896, and was ordained Deacon September 6th, 1896, by Bishop Charles 
B. Galloway; was ordained Elder, September 8th, 1901, by Bishop Warren A. Candler 
at the Missouri Annual Conference which was at that time in session in St. Joseph, 
Missouri. He has served the following appointments: Ashland Circuit, 1896; Prairie 
Hill Circuit, 1897-1900; Jameson Circuit, 1900-1904; Monroe City Station, 1904-1906. 
Brother Lehnhoff is a man of strong character, true and reliable, with good business 
qualities, a faithful pastor, a fluent speaker, and a good preacher. 

He married Miss Jennie E. Shepherd, October 7th, 1896. Two children have 
been born unto them, one dying in infancy, and the other living, Edward Palmore 
Lehnhoff. 



348 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



BROOKVALE TENT. 




Mrs. M. L. Gray. Miss S. Burdette Edmonds. 

Mrs. Thos. J. Edmonds. Mr. Taos. J. Edmonds. 

Miss Verley J. Edmonds. 
(Deceased) 

Methodists Tenting- at Brookvale near O'Bryen Chapel, 

Shelby County. Mo. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



349 



REV CHARLES JACOB CHAPPELL. 



I press toward the Mark. — St. Paul. 



Charles Jacob Chappell is the 
son of Oscar Chappell and Mar- 
garet Chappell, members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He was born in Lewis 
County, Missouri, November 15, 
1872. At Humphreys, Missouri, 
July, 1888, under the ministry 
of Rev. B. D. Sipple, he was 
converted, and united with the 
church at Humphreys July 29th, 
1888. Brother Chappell says: 
"I was under deep conviction 
for several days, went forward 
and knelt at the altar three 
nights in succession. The third 
ni>ht peace came to my soul. 
The Spirit came into my soul 
in a calm, gentle way. I could 
feel the evil spirit driven out be- 
fore the mighty Spirit of Jesus 
Christ. I have grown in grace 
gradually but surely. The un- 
derstanding of the things of 
God has come by prayer and 
meditation on his holy Word. 
A love to God and man has 
been made more perfect day by 
day by doing his holy will." 

His license to preach is dated 
April 15th, 1897, at Triplett, 
Missouri, by the Chillicothe Dis- 
trict Conference. Rev. S. H. 
Renfro was preacher in charge, 
and Rev. J. A. Snarr, Presiding 
Elder. He was recommended by 
the Chillicothe District Confer- 
ence to the Annual Conference 

for admission on trial April 15th, 1897, discontinued September, 1899, because of 
poor health, served as local preacher until September, 1903. Rev. O. B. Holliday, Pre- 
siding Elder, then appointed him to supply Gorin Circuit, and he was again recom- 
mended for admission on trial into the Annual Conference by the District Confer- 
ence of Hannibal District, April 6th, 1904. 

Brother Chappell was received on trial by the Missouri Conference in 1897, 
Bishop Fitzgerald, presiding, but, health failing, he remained in the Conference only 
two years, and was again admitted on trial September, 1904, at Columbia, where he 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop Hendrix. 

His appointments and terms of service have been as follows: Green Castle Cir- 
cuit, one year; Harris Circuit, one year; Gorin Circuit, three years. 

For four years a student in the Chillicothe District Academy, and a faithful 
and conscientious student and worker in the itinerant ranks, Brother Chappell has 
proven himself to be an effective and acceptable minister of the Gospel, having re- 
ceived sixty-one members into the church, and, we may safely say, is still adding to 
the number. The work prospers in his hands. 

He was married to Miss Lucy O. Ingraham, November 5th, 1893. Their children 
are Paul J. and Ruth E. Chappell. One, Ella Marie, died August 21st, 1903. 

The time he gave himself in complete surrender to God, to preach the Gospel of 
His Son, our brother considers to be the important crisis in his life. He felt the 
call early in life, but the world offered strong" inducements to other employment, and 
the time of struggle came. Does it not come to every life in one form or another. 
Suffice it to say, he gained the victory and is happy in his work. 




350 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV WILLIAM DEE NEALE. 



God magnifies Man by sharing with him His greatest Thoughts, 
And thus fits him for Thrones of intellectual and Spiritual 
Might. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. William Dee Neale was 
born on a farm in Ralls County, 
Missouri, November 11, 1870. 
He is the youngest son of Ben- 
jamin D. Neale and Sallie M. 
Neale, who were among the 
earliest members of the Meth- 
odist Church, South, at Hydes- 
burg, a country church near 
Hannibal. At the age of eleven 
years he was converted at the 
altar of the church of his par- 
ents after a sermon preached by 
Rev. J. P. Nolan, D. D., then 
Presiding Elder of the Hannibal 
District. Having been bapcized 
in infancy by the Rev. W W 
McMurry, he received the church 
vows from his pastor, the Rev. 
H. W. James, the Sunday fol- 
lowing his conversion. Although 
but a boy, he had a clear evi- 
dence of his acceptance with 
God. All was bright within and 
in God's world without. A few 
years afterward he took up the 
cross of public prayer and tes- 
timony for the Master and found 
his growth in grace very marked 
from that time. While attending 
school at Palmyra and boarding 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
R. I. Winn, he was called of 
God to preach the Gospel. The 
Quarterly Conference of the Pal- 
myra Circuit, which convened at 
Hydesburg, November 29, 1890, 
licensed nim to t)r©3,ch * the Rgv 
J. R. A. Vaughan was Presiding Elder, and the Rev. H. P, Bond was pastor. Two 
years were spent in teaching school, the last of which he was professor of math- 
ematics in Centenary College of Palmyra. Having been recommended to the Mis- 
souri Conference for admission on trial by the Hannibal Conference, he was re- 
ceived by that body at Montgomery City in September, 1892, Bishop Charles B. 
Galloway, presiding. At the close of the following Conference year he asked to be 
discontinued for the purpose of attending school. After two years in college, he 
was readmitted to the Missouri Conference at Macon City in 1895, Bishop W. W. 
Duncan in the chair. On September 6, 1896, he was ordained Deacon by Bishop 
Galloway at the Hannibal session of the Annual Conference. At Fayette Bishop 
John C. Granbery ordained him Elder September 3, 1899. 

He is a graduate of Centenary College at Palmyra, Missouri, and has attended 
Central College at Fayette, Missouri, and the Methodist University of Georgetown, 
Texas. October 30, 1895, he was married to Miss Virginia Edna Feeley, the oldest 
daughter of James L. Feeley and Mattie E. Feeley, old time Methodists of Shelby 
County, Missouri. Two children brighten their home, Kathleen and Richard, ages 
ten and seven. The books that have been the most inspiration to him, aside from 
the Bible, are "Pilgrim's Progress," "Life of Bishop Marvin," and " Life of William G. 
Caples." 

He has served acceptably the following charges: Rutledge, Dalton, Jamesport, 
u w Hampton, Maywood, Monticello, Hunnewell, and is at present the pastor of 
the Kahoka Station. Nine years of his ministry have been spent in the Hannibal 
District. 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



351 



REV. THOMAS ASHLEY ALLISON. 



To the humblest task the man of mighty motives advances 
Keeping step to martial music. — Bishop Candler. 



Rev. Thomas Ashley Allison 
was born March 29th, 1866, 
three miles Southwest of Rich- 
mond, Ray County, Missouri. 
He is a son of Christopher C. 
Allison and Mary F. Allison, 
both members, from their 
youth, of the Primitive Baptist 
Church. He was converted in 
1880, in Dade County, Missouri, 
at a Baptist camp meeting con- 
ducted in a grove. He joined 
the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church soon after this conver- 
sion, then after about seven 
years, he united with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South, 
at Orrick, Missouri. He was 
converted, as it seemed to him, 
with wonderful power at the 
old fashioned mourner's bench; 
he had asked for the prayers of 
the church one year before this 
time. His mother, who was 
quite religious, always had a 
great influence over him for 
good. He is very confident that 
he has a more perfect under- 
standing of the things cf God 
and a stronger will to do good. 
His growth in grace, is not 
entirely satisfactory to him, yet 
he is striving in all things to be 
more perfect in Christ. He was 
licensed to preach March 19th, 
1894, by the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Richmond Station; Rev. 
W. F. McMurry, D. D.. preacher 

in charge, and Rev. R. H. Cooper, Presiding Elder. He was recommended to the 
Annual Conference for admission on trial by the Gallatin District Conference in 
the spring of 1895, and was received on trial into the Annual Conference in 1895; 
Rev. Z. M. Williams, D.D., Presiding Elder, and Bishop W. W. Duncan, presiding. 
He was ordained Deacon by Bishop 0. P, Fitzgerald in 1897, at Albany, Missouri; was 
ordained Elder by Bishop John C. Granbery September 3rd, 1899, at Fayette, Mis- 
souri. Brother Allison has served the following charges: Bethany Circuit, 1894- 
1895; Eagleville Circuit, 1895-1898; Breckenridge and Mooresville charge, 1898-1901; 
Union Star, 1901-1902; Kearney and Lathrop, 1902-1903; Shelbina Circuit, 1903-1905; 
Edina, 1905-1906; his present charge is Gorin, Missouri, having received his appoint- 
ment in 1906. About two hundred and forty-one members have been received into the 
church under his ministry. Under his pastorates the church at Matkins was built, 
the church at Edina, though not finished, yet practically so, and the parsonage was 
bought at Kearney. He received his education in the public schools and county nor- 
mals of Ray County, Missouri. He was married to Miss Laura A. Kmcaid January 
20th, 1889, and their children are: Pearl J. Allison, Thomas A. Allison Bascom 
D. Allison, Zach M. Allison, Helen M. Allison, Chris. K. Allison and John M. Allison. 
He believes the Christian College should be supported by the church and kept tree oi 
all state entanglements. 




352 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV THOMAS RUCKER KENDALL. 



Mine is an unchanging love, 

Higher than the heights above. — William Cowper. 

Thomas Rucker Kendall was 
born in Shelby County, Ken- 
tucky, December 13th, 1835, and 
emigrated to Missouri in 1852. 
He was born again and joined 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, in the spring of 1859. 
He was licensed to exhort and 
preach the same year, and he 
taught school and preached until 
the autumn of 1860, rhen he en- 
tered St. Charles College and 
continued there until the war, 
when he returned to Scotland 
County. He tried to teach and 
failed; the war excitement was 
too great. In the spring of 1862 
he went to Colorado, locating in 
Lake County for the summer 
and spending the following win- 
ter in Gilpin County, preaching, 
mining and continuing his stud- 
ies. In the summer of 1863 he 
preached as supply in Boulder 
and St. Urain valleys. In the 
autumn of 1863 he returned to 
Missouri and followed teaching 
with success until 1866. On 
May 11th, 1864, he was married 
to Miss H. S. Walker of Mem- 
phis, Missouri. In February, 
1866, he was engaged as supply 
for Smithville, Illinois, by Rev. 
Rumsey Smithson, Superintend- 
ent of Christian Union of Illi- 
nois. He filled the following 
charges: Smithville, two and 
one-half years; Ottawa, two 
years; Hebron, two years; Midway, one year. He had many conversions and addi- 
tions and built a parsonage on the Ottawa Circuit. The Christian Union, composed of 
members driven from various churches by political preaching, was merged in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, now the Illinois Conference. In the autumn of 
1873 he transferred to the Missouri Conference and served consecutively, until 1894, the 
following charges: Newark, one year; had many conversions and additions and 
churches wonderfully blessed; Canton, one year; unable to do much on account of 
poor health following typho-malarial fever; the kindness of his people is yet sacred 
in his memory; Palmyra Circuit, two years; work opened with bright prospects; a 
good but sad year ; in April his wife bade them farewell and went home to God, and left 
the father, Ida and Marvin very lonely and sad; under these shadows he had the 
visitation of God's light and power with conversions and additions ; 1877, appointed to 
Colony, two years; October 11th, 1877, was married to Miss Willie C. Brown, of Phila- 
delphia, Marion County, a native Virginian; had many conversions and additions and 
other prosperities; 1879, LaBelle, three years; built parsonage at LaBelle and secured 
lot for church; built a church in Shelby County; three busy years; Philadelphia, two 
profitable years to all; Ashley, three prosperous years; 1886, New Florence, two years; 
Jonesburg, two years; Winfield, three years; built new church at Asbury and secured 
parsonage at Winfield; 1894, health failed; he went to Colorado in May and spent two 
months in Colorado Springs, then located at Lake George in the mountains. In the 
late autumn he was joined by his wife and Mamie Kendall, Lucy B. Kendall, Willie Lee 
Kendall and Ruby P. Kendall, his four estimable daughters. After his health returned 
he preached regularly on Sabbaths in mountain towns and settlements. He resided 
and preached in Florissant for two years. His hope is in God. Though the outward 
man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by day. "Bless the Lord, oh my soul, 
and all that is within me bless His holy name. Amen." 




MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



353 



REV SAMUEL RODGERS DILLMAN. 



One in whom persuasion and belief had ripened into Faith, and 
Faith became a passionate intuition. — Wordsworth. 



Rev. Samuel Rodgers Dillman 
was born May 9th, 1874, in Lan- 
caster County, Pennsylvania. 
He is the son of A. F. Dillman 
and Annie M. Dillman, who 
were members of the United 
Brethren Church, but later his 
mother became a member of the 
Methodist Church. He was con- 
verted November 14th, 1885, at 
Oregon, Pennsylvania, under the 
ministry of Rev. G. A. Loose, 
of Reading, Pennsylvania, and 
joined the United Brethren 
Church at Oregon, Pennsyl- 
vania. He was converted in the 
old-fashioned way, being at the 
mourner's bench for several 
nights before he found complete 
peace when God was permitted 
to come in His way. His growth 
in grace has been steady and 
constant and he now has a much 
richer and fuller understanding 
and experience of the things of 
God. He was licensed to preach 
by the Quarterly Conference of 
the United Brethren Church at 
Trenton, Missouri, April 9th, 
1894; Rev. U. P. Wardrip, Pre- 
siding Elder. He was received 
into the Missouri Conference at 
Fulton, Missouri, September 
16th, 1900, as a traveling 
preacher, having been ordained 
to the office of an elder accord- 
ing to the usages of the United 
Brethren Church. Brother Dili- 
man has served the following 

appointments: At Brookfield and Trenton filled unexpired terms; as a supply at 
Brashear, three years; Raymore, two years; since uniting with the Missouri Confer- 
ence, at Hunnewell, three years; Monticello, four years. During the time he has 
been in the Missouri Conference, he has received about two hundred and forty persons 
into the Church. The Church at Monticello, Missouri, was built during his pastorate 
there. He received his education at the Alexis Illinois High School, and was graduated 
from the Avalon College, Trenton, Missouri; also from the Kirksville, Missouri, State 
Normal, Kirksville, Missouri. He was married to Miss Daisy Dean Drinkard in Decem- 
ber, 1897. Brother Dillman had the good fortune to marry into one of the best Methodist 
families in Macon county, and he is worthy of the family. He has found a congenial 
church home in the Methodist Episcopal Church. South, and he is diligent in his en- 
deavors for the Church. He preaches well, and rings true on the fundamental doc- 
trines of the Bible. He loves his people and he is loved by them. 




354 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




O'BRYEN CHAPEL. 



This Church was built while Rev. J. M. O'Bryen was preacher in charge of the 
Shelbyville Circuit. The church was named in honor of the pastor. Mr. Theodore 
Feely and family and others are good supporters of this church. 




















** 



s 










SJLL 





St.Louis Annual Conferwce 

ot the M E Chuah. South 
Fifty-fust Session Ot S«t». M« 16% 

Copyright 1898 by R.E&A.SHinchey. 






Copyright 1904 by A.^S Hinchey, De Soto. M<>.: Hepioduced by permission. 



MISSOURI CONFERENCE— HANNIBAL DISTRICT. 



355 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE, CENTENNIAL VOLUME. 



1. 


W 


H. Pascoe 


42. 


J. 


C. L. Boehm 


S3. 


H. 


Whitehead 


2. 


W 


H. Cunningham 


43. 


J. 


T. Triplett 


84. 


A. 


S. Coker 


3. 


C. 


M. Cagle 


44. 


J. 


Stephan 


85. 


A. 


M. Robinson 


4. 


R. 


E. Atkinson 


45. 


W 


B. Palmore 


86. 


G. 


E. Parsons 


5. 


W 


. Carlisle 


46. 


W 


M. Prottsman 


87. 


J. 


M. Boiling 


6. 


o. 


H. Phillips 


47. 


w 


S. Taylor 


88. 


J. 


P Johnson 


7. 


G. 


W Hull 


48. 


A. 


S'ymons 


89. 


W 


Lowe 


8. 


F. 


Wisdom 


49. 


M. 


T. Haw 


90. 


s. 


J. Watson 


9. 


J. 


K. P Dickson 


50. 


J. 


R. Eddleman 


91. 


J. 


C. Burkholder 


10. 


W 


H. Blake 


51. 


O. 


H. Halliburton 


92. 


A. 


P. Saffold 


11. 


W 


Q. Donnon 


52. 


w 


R. Mays 


93. 


T. 


H. Clayton 


12. 


J. 


F. Stukenbreaker 


53. 


J. 


H. Headlee 


94. 


W 


J. Velvick 


13. 


J. 


Ulery 


54. 


N. 


B. Henry 


95. 


A. 


H. Russell 


14. 


s. 


C. Riffle 


55. 


A. 


T. Tidwell 


96. 


W 


D. Henderson 


15. 


J. 


F. Comer 


5 6. 


S. 


H. Werlein 


97. 


C. 


M. Gray 


16. 


F. 


M. Ladd 


57. 


J. 


A. Russell 


98. 


Z. 


T. McCann 


17. 


J. 


W. Worsnop 


58. 


J. 


B. Seay 


99. 


L. 


L. Pinnell 


18. 


F. 


Moore 


59. 


w 


. P. Gibson 


100. 


W 


W Moss 


19. 


J. 


M. England 


60. 


s. 


Richmond 


101. 


W 


B. Patty 


20. 


A. 


R. Williams 


61. 


E. 


B. Chappell 


102. 


B. 


F. Ray 


21. 


H. 


R. Singleton 


62. 


J. 


Mathews 


103. 


R. 


D. Kennedy 


22. 


W 


. T. Barnhouse 


6 3. 


H. 


M. Eure 


104. 


M. 


Pipkin 


23. 


C. 


M. Davenport 


64. 


J. 


W Robinson 


105. 


R. 


L. Russell 


24. 


M. 


D. Lewis 


6 5. 


T. 


C. Cooksey 


106. 


J. 


A. Collins 


25. 


R. 


Wilkinson 


66. 


T. 


B. Sharp 


107. 


H. 


V Johnson 


26. 


W 


H. Paschall 


67. 


H. 


A. Smith 


108. 


W 


J. Heys 


27. 


w 


. A. Humphreys 


68. 


W 


B. North 


109. 


J. 


C. Croft 


28. 


J. 


M. Stamper 


69. 


J. 


W Lee 


110. 


M. 


T. Gregory 


29. 


J. 


M. King 


70. 


J. 


C. Berryman 


111. 


H. 


L. Jenkinson 


30. 


J. 


M. Beard 


71. 


T. 


M. Finney 


112. 


A. 


E. Whitaker 


31. 


L. 


R. Mauk 


72. 


J. 


L. Batten 


113. 


C. 


P. Marchman 


32. 


J. 


N. Holmes 


73. 


J. 


M. Moore 


114. 


R. 


Walton 


33. 


J. 


H. Early 


74. 


H. 


L. Davis 


115. 


T. 


J. Hancock 


34. 


J. 


M. Keithley 


75. 


C. 


L. Smith 


116. 


C. 


Burton 


35. 


A. 


T. Osborn 


76. 


L. 


F. Aspley 


117. 


C. 


S. Rennison 


36. 


S. 


J. Upton 


77. 


J. 


H. Prichett 


118. 


J. 


K. Mathews 


37. 


A. 


B. Haltom 


78. 


W 


. S. Woodard 


119. 


T. 


Lord 


38. 


E. 


A. Hogan 


79. 


s. 


W Emory 


120. 


J. 


M. S'tults 


39. 


F. 


Eaker 


80. 


J. 


L. Carlisle 








40. 


J. 


G. Doyle 


81. 


T. 


P Hill 








41. 


J. 


A. Greening 


82. 


L. 


D. Nichols 









356 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE. 




GENERAL BOOTH. 



1 806-CENTENNIAL APPOINTMENTS— 1 905. 



ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



T. E. Sharp. 
Centenary. 
St. John. 
Cook Avenue. 
Wagoner Place. 
Lafayette Park. 
Cabanne . 
St. Paul. 
First Church. 
Mount Auburn. 
Shaw Avenue. 
Marvin . 
Carondelet . 
Immanuel . 



.Presiding Elder 

. Samuel R. Hay 

• H. S. Bradley 

.Caspar S. Wright 

-C. W Webdell 

... .L. E. Todd 

.C. M. Hawkins 

Theodore Copeland 

... . R. L. Russell 

Thomas F. Rucker 

.Josephus Stephan 

.C. F. Blackburn 

W. R. Mays 

.Z. T. McCann 



Oak Hill. 

Kirkwood . 

Clayton . 

Ferguson . 

Bridgeton and Coldwater 

Belief ontaine. 

Sloan Mission. 

Grand Avenue. 

Secretary Church Extension Board 

W. F. McMurry 
President Central Female College. 

• A. F. Smith 
Secretary of Education. ... T. E. Sharp 



W Q. Donnon 
.J. H. Young 
W. B. North 
.J. M. Stultz 

R. E. Atkinson 

. G. W. Nollner 
.R. P. Basler 

William Court 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



357 



REV- THOMAS E. SHARP, D.D. 



The Sovereignty of Man lieth hid in Knowledge. — Bacon. 

At fourteen years of 
age Rev. Thomas E. 
Sharp was led to Christ 
under the ministry of 
the Rev. H. W Eagan, 
and lived a devoted 
Christian life for a 
number of years. He 
gradually fell away 
from devotion, but nev-? 
er from faith in the 
verities of the Christian 
religion, still he had 
ceased to regard him- 
self as a Christian. Out 
in God's great cathed- 
ral, the woods, near 
Kirksville, Missouri, in 
company with Rev. 
George W Sharp, a be- 
loved cousin, to whom, 
with his good wife, he 
owes an everlasting- 
debt of gratitude, while 
together they prayed 
"he for me and I for 
myself," God gracious- 
ly forgave his sins and 
he was received as his 
child again, June 10th, 
1888. He must here al- 
so record the debt he 
owes to the devotion of 
his wife and daughter, 
the latter since gone to 
Heaven, and the mem- 
ory of his parents, 
whose lofty Christian 
character never ceased 
to be a factor in his re- 
ligious life. July 11th, 
1888, he joined the 
Met h o d i s t Episcopal 
Church, South, at Can- 
ton, Missouri, of 

which the Rev. Jacob ■ ■ > n . , 1 „ , „x, 11v „a,. 

Snarr was pastor. July 16th, 1888, he was licensed to preach by the Canton churcn, 
the Rev. W W. McMurry, Presiding Elder. The call to preach had been resisted 
for eight years, and this resistance he believes was one cause of his backsliding. Juiy 
23rd he preached his first sermon in the Methodist Church at La Grange, Missouri. 
In September, 1888, he was appointed by Bishop Hendrix, supply at Warrenton ana 
Wright City Circuit, having previously preached six sermons, four of which, ne say*, 
"were so poor" that he could never bring himself to preach them over again, and thus 
he began his pastorate with a stock of two sermons. This first year of his ministry 
was at once the hardest and happiest of his life. He was admitted ontrialm^ the 
Missouri Conference in September, 1889, and was appointed pastor of the ™™X£ 
Circuit, by Bishop Key; he served this charge for two years On Sunday, ^eptemDer 
6th, 1889, he was ordained Deacon by Bishop Hargrove, at the Conference held a Mary- 
ville, Missouri, and the next day appointed pastor of the Maryville Church, serving one 
year in this Station. He was appointed pastor of the Columbia Station, ^ptemDer 
1892, and served this Church three years; he was ordained Elder at the Conference ai 
Monroe City, Missouri, by Bishop Haygood. In September, 1895, he was appoint* 
pastor of Fayette Station, serving this church for three years. He was .transferred t* 
the St. Louis Conference by Bishop Candler, and appointed pastor of the ^ Wagoner 
Place church, and served this church four years. In May, 1902, Hargrove College 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. 




358 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 









, 


■ ,.■',.-,,'. -'■f»«: ! f'l.i : ;:,:A, 














v> :■.'.'■../. ' ..> ' 










; >,^ 


™ 


^^'^hJE- . : 








if 6 '*'* 


Bf# 




i8 






w 




1 


1 








r j| 


'". 






v* 






m 


1 














IvQ" 


■:^fi^^M^^k. - : 


■-^■■;:^-£ ; .H' r 










: #llt$fe^f 




■■ " ; ■ ' - 


i 




x I 


«» 


.■■ ■■ ■.. ■■.■■■ . ..:■■■ ,■ ■ 


: 




^™ 


jk 


.■>■■■. 

1 


7>r :°i 






HI 


■■'>'■ 




MpSBBJl 

V 
■■■■ 


if'tt 






i 






III^JII^^^;-':?:^ 




■ 




^j»r* t 


ft / 



REV HENRY STILES BRADLEY, D.D. 



We feel our lives resonant to the thoughts of elect thinkers. — 
Dr. William A. Quayle. 



Rev. Henry Stiles Bradley, D.D., was born in Jackson County, Georgia, March 
22nd, 1869. He is the son of Henry Stiles Bradley and Susan Jackson Bradley. 
Georgia has given a great amny preachers to the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, such as Bishop Pierce, Dr. Young J. Allen, Dr. James W. Lee, and 
many others, and Dr. Bradley ranks with the best of them. In early life he decided 
on a college course, and to this end he bent all his energies. He went with the spirit 
of a student to Emory College, Oxford, Georgia, and he found a congenial atmosphere 
in association with fellow students and with the members of the faculty. Blessed as 
he was with an active mind, he found himself happy in this higher intellectual world. 
He sought the fountain of truth eagerly, and went into the reason of things. His 
plow must go deep or not at all. Later he gathered the harvest all the richer. In 
1890 he won his A.B. degree from Emory College. After this the University of Georgia 
recognized his merits and ability, and conferred on him the degree of D.D. But it 
was not for him to stop with graduation and honors, so he pursued post graduate work 
at Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, taking Biology; Cold Spring Harbor, New 
York, 1896; Marine Biological Laboratories, Woods Hall, Massachusetts, 1897. These 
after-graduate studies show the trend of his thought, and they have enabled him to 
examine the foundations of life. Miss May Stafford became an important factor in 
his life when the Orange Blossoms were showered upon them at Barnesville, Georgia, 
November 1st, 1893. Since those happy days life has been a morning song. Dr. 
Bradley applied for admission into the North Georgia Conference in 1891; was re- 
ceived into full connection, 1893; was Adjunct Professor of Natural Sciences at Emory 
College, 1890-1895; Professor of Biology and Geology, 1898-1901; Vice President of 
Emory College, 1899-1901; and resigned all college positions in 1901. He then became 
pastor of Trinity Church, Atlanta, where he remained four years. He came from 
Atlanta to St. Louis to take charge of St. John's Church, where he enjoys the love 
and esteem of his people and his brethren. 




ST. JOHNS CHURCH. 

Rev. Henry Stiles Bradley, D.D., Pastor. 

This church was erected while Rev. James W. Lee, D.D., wis pastor, and it is one of the most costly and elegant churches 

m the St. Louis District. This is truly a family church. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 359 



JOHN WESLEY 

THE POWER OF A GREAT PERSONALITY. 



By Bishop E. K. Hendrix. 

Wesley, who was to help every great Church in Christendom, was a learner of 
all. Like Paul, the slave of the rubric in his early life, he sat at the feet of Peter 
Bohler, the Moravian, as Saul of Tarsus sat at the feet of Ananias of Damascus in his 
eagerness to know the whole truth as it is in Jesus. He would know all that could 
be taught by the Scotch Presbyterians or the Lutheran Salzburgers, by Thomas A. 
Kempis or Thomas Law. No scientist ever studied physical phenomena as John Wesley 
studied spiritual phenomena gathered through his large correspondence and wide ob- 
servation. His intellectual hospitality was unbounded in the desire to know all that 
God was still doing in his world, and he sought to weigh and classify facts so soon 
as a careful analysis showed that they were facts. His monthly meeting to hear the 
triumphs of grace in whatever part of Christendom gave the stamp of catholicity to 
Methodism which has made it at once the most tolerant of all faiths toward all who 
love the Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity and, through its theology, that can be preached, 
has made it the great enricher and modifier of the creeds of Christendom. A gospel 
that can be offered to all the world is the true parent of a creed that can be shared 
with all mankind. Despite a tendency among his followers to confound a religious 
vocabulary with a religious experience, John Wesley ever declared the fullness of the 
blessing of the gospel of peace. All that there was in the gospel he was eager to 
know and to teach; and while his own profession was ever modest, he set no limit to 
the power of the gospel, the life of God in the soul of man. To Wesley man was a 
"yonder-sided being," his life hid with Christ in God. He believed that the graft 
would ultimately determine the fruit. It was this broad catholicity, this faith alike 
in man under God and in God over man, that made him the leader of the great religious 
movement of the Eighteenth century, a revival that promises to continue to the end 
of the world. The truest picture of John Wesley is that which represents him stand- 
ing on his father's tombstone, in reverent touch with the past, but with a message for 
the present and the future, as he declares: "I look upon the whole world as my 
parish." No wonder from such a new and powerful preaching of the old gospel there 
should come the mightest agents for its spread, whether in Missionary or Bible Socie- 
ties, the living evangels and the groaning presses, whose voice has gone out into all 
the world until the reapers shall overtake the sower, and reaper and sower shall 
rejoice together. In subordinating the creed to the life Wesley helped to deliver men 
from the religion of a mere creed to the glorious liberty of the sons of God who know 
the gospel of a person, even the Christ of God. 

The true measure of a great life is its lifting power. An average man lives, but 
a great man lifts. Whenever there has been any learned class, it has usually been the 
clergy, especially in view of the fact that they are forbidden to learn and practice the 
art of war, the usual outlet for surplus human energy. But human learning must 
have an outlet to keep it from stagnation, and the enthusiasm of humanity born of 
religion gives that outlet such as Wesley found. But there can be no true enthusiasm 
of humanity without faith in humanity; and there can be no faith in humanity without 
faith in the Son of God as realized humanity. 



360 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- JOHN MATHEWS, D.D. 



The men who have the ear of the world are the prophets fresh 
From an audience with God. — Bishop Hendrix. 



Rev. John Mathews, D.D., was 
born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
June 13th, 182b. Was reared in 
Tennessee. Licensed to preach in 
1845. Entered the traveling con- 
nection, 1846. Received four ap- 
pointments in the Tennessee; then 
transferred to the Pacific Confer- 
ence in 1852. At the end of the 
ecclesiastical year returned to 
Tennessee; was stationed at four 
churches. While at Florence, Ala- 
bama, he was married to Miss 
Mary A. Menefee, April 30th, 1857. 
At Florence he had a sweeping re- 
vival, with 150 conversions. He 
then transferred to the Alabama 
Conference, and was stationed at 
Tuscaloosa, where his labors were 
greatly blessed. From there he 
was sent to Tuskegee; thence to 
Auburn; then, for one year, was 
Presiding Elder. During the next 
three years he lived on his planta- 
tion, and was appointed to charges 
near his home during the Civil 
War. At the close of the war he 
sold out his plantation, in order to 
continue in the itinerancy. He 
spent one year in Wetumpka, and 
was then sent to the city of Mont- 
gomery, where he spent four years, 
During the last year of this pas- 
torate, a most wonderful revival 
took place, reaching all classes. In 
the winter of 1870 he transferred 
to the Louisiana Conference, and 
was stationed at Felicity Street 
Church; God honored his ministry 
here; there were conversions and 
accessions constantly. At the close 
of this quadrennium, he was sta- 
tioned at the historical Carondelet Street Church; there the work of God was carried 
forward with great power; hundreds were converted. During the last year of this pas- 
torate, a great epidemic of yellow fever swept over the city; he and his entire family 
were stricken with the fever, and his youngest son died. At the end of this quadren- 
nium he was sent to what is now called Rayne Memorial Church, where he labored for 
three years, working incessantly. At the earnest solicitation of Bishop Pierce, he then 
consented to transfer to the Southwest Missouri Conference, and was stationed at the old 
Walnut Street Church, in Kansas City, where God wrought marvelous things. After one 
year at Washington street, he was transferred to the St. Louis Conference, and was sta- 
tioned at Centenary Church; during this quadrennium, God greatly blessed his labors; 
hundreds were added unto the Lord. At the close of this pastorate the city officials of 
St. Louis, Roman Catholics though they were, united in a public testimonial, expressing 
their high appreciation of the influence of his minstry upon the morals of the city. From 
here he was sent to St. John's, the celebrated family church of Methodism; during this 
pastorate the Lord blessed him with a gracious revival, in which many were converted. 
At the end of three years he was returned to Centenary Church, where he remained in 
charge for five years — one year beyond the legal limit. The Lord wrought a great work 
here, the fifth year being the most prosperous of all in its visible results. At the close of 
this pastorate he was transferred to the Tennessee Conference, and stationed at the fa- 
mous McKendree Church, where he spent four years of diligent service and great profit. 
During the close of this pastorate he was attacked by the grippe, from which he never 
rcovered; it finally left him a total physical wreck. 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



361 



REV WESLEY BROWNING. 



The best of all is: God is with us. — John Wesley. 



Rev. Wesley Browning was 

born August 15th, 1795, at Hag- 

erstown, Maryland. He was a 

son of Archibald Browning, a 

local Methodist preacher, and 

Margaret Browning. He was 

converted at Chillicothe, Ohio, at 

the age of twenty-six, and joined 

the church at once. He and a 

companion had been very 

wicked. While the latter was 

away on a visit to Kentucky, he 

was converted, and wrote to 

Brother Browning a proposition 

to pray every day for him for 

six weeks, and Browning must 

also pray and then report by let- 
ter at the end of the six weeks. 
Brother Browning did nothing 

till three weeks had gone, but 

then began in earnest to seek 

salvation and asked various peo- 
ple, on the street, or anywhere, 

how to get religion. At last the 
quarterly meeting was held, and 
while at public prayer Browning 
clapped his hands and exclaimed 
"Glory to God, now I've got it,'' 
meaning the witness of the 
spirit. He went right into re- 
ligious work and study and went 
on to the best appointments m 
the Pittsburg Conference, to 
which he was transferred, and 
soon was a shining witness for 
full salvation as taught by John 
Wesley and his brother Charles, 

and continued in the experience . , 

until he passed to his reward. He began to preach in ChiUicothe Ohio, and was ; rec- 
ommended by one of the Quarterly Conferences of that District He was orda med 
Deacon by Bishop Roberts. At various times he served the leading charges in Pitts- 
burg and the Ohio Conferences; was Presiding Elder when Mathew Simpson, after- 
ward Bishop, was a young man, and the mam instrument to encourage him to ask 
the District Conference for license to preach and helped him at college. He had no 
school advantages during early life, but after entering Conference he studied hard 
and became an accomplished Hebrew scholar. He was twice > marned , first ; to .Miss 
Phoebe Battelle, in 1836, and to Miss Phebe Dunn in 1846. He has two son ^ hvmg, 
Fletcher W Browning, of St. Louis, Missouri, and John Gay Browning, of Sprmgdale, 

Ark Of Sa Rev. Wesley Browning, Dr. D. R. McAnally writes: J^iV^Y^ to ^ullv 
of natural life he saw the federal population increase from i 3,929,214 ml 79U, to ^iuiiy 
65,000,000 in 1888. He saw Methodism, in these United States, , nume " ca , n ^ on m c ft r ea ^ 
from 50,604 all told, ministers and members, in the year he was borr l to 5 000 000 m 
the year that he died. He saw American Methodism extend itself into differentparts 
of Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, and the isles of the seas. Rev Wesley 
Browning was the first man to plant Methodism among the Germans. In the 4^ne 
had Bishop Morris send Rev. Ludwick Jacoby to St. Louis to evangelize the German 
people. 




362 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MR. SAMUEL CUPPLES. 



The Bible invites, attracts, and commands the adhesion of 
Mankind. — Gladstone. 



By Bishop E. R. Hendrix. 

Mr. Samuel Cupples was born September 13th, 1831, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 
He is the son of James and Elizabeth Cupples, natives of County Down, of Ireland, 
who came to the United States in 1814. His father established a school in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, in which the son laid the foundation for his successful business career. 
When some fifteen years of age, the son being left by his father's death the sole de- 
pendence of his mother and sister, removed to Cincinnati, Ohio. There he entered the 
employ of Mr. Albert 0. Tyler, the pioneer woodenware merchant of the West. So did 
he impress his employer by his ability and integrity that, although not yet of age, he 
established the house of Samuel Cupples & Co., of St. Louis, 1851, his former employer 
being the silent and responsible partner. This was the foundation of the Cupples 
Woodenware Company, the largest establishment of its kind in the world, having acres 
of manufacturing plants of all sorts and also branch houses in different cities reaching 
from ocean to ocean. In his broad and statesmanlike views of business, his selection of 
his associates, his consideration for his employees, and his Christian liberality, Mr. 
Cupples is a notable man in the business world. "Cupples Station," which he founded 
in the heart of St. Louis for handling the great wholesale business by train loads, 
attracts visitors from all parts of the world. 

Mr. Cupples became a Christian when living in Newport, Kentucky, in 1848, and 
for nearly sixty years has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
In 1860 he was married to Miss Martha Kells, a noble Christian woman, who was in 
full sympathy with him in all his Christian life and work. It was in her memory that 
Mr. Cupples built the beautiful building for the Methodist Orphans Home in St. Louis. 
As an active member of the Church, Mr. Cupples has shared in the work of all her 
organizations. He has been an unfaltering friend in all the forward movements of the 
Church in St. Louis, a curator and benefactor of Central College, Fayette, and is now 
the President of the Board of Trustees of the Robert A. Barnes Hospital of St. Louis. 
No Church has been more blessed than ours with such laymen as Brothers Cupples 
and Scruggs. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUJS DISTRICT. 



363 




W. E. GLADSTONE. 



Quoted in connection with the life of Mr. Samuel Cupples, St. Louis, Mo. 



364 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV. JOHN EMORY GODBEY, D.D. 



The renown of goodness, the fame of character, the reputation 
Associated with deeds of sacrifice or valor — that is a renown 
Which lives in Heaven. — Dr. Joseph Parker. 



Rev. John Emory Godbey, the 
son of Rev. Josiah Godbey and 
Lena Kelly Godbey, was born 
August 11th, 1839, in Casey 
County, Kentucky. The God- 
beys were Methodists. Dr. God- 
bey thinks there are twenty- 
seven Methodist preachers who 
have come from the families of 
his grandparents. Dr. J. E. 
Godbey was educated chiefly in 
private subscription schools, but 
for the most part his teachers 
were well educated and compe- 
tent men. He was in the Sopho- 
more class at St. Charles Col- 
lege, when the breaking out of 
the Civil War closed the school. 
Being forced to abandon his 
plans, he yielded to the advice 
of friends and entered the itin- 
eracy in the St. Louis Confer- 
ence. He had been licensed to 
preach by Dr. John R. Bennett, 
at Otterville, Missouri, in the 
fall of 1859, on recommendation 
of the Quarterly Conference of 
that charge. His first appoint- 
ment was to Independence Cir- 
cuit. Brother Godbey served 
Asbury charge a year, and was 
then assigned to Merrimac Cir- 
cuit, which charge he held for 
two years and a half. He was 
married to Miss Mary S. Hollo- 
way, November 2nd, 1865, and 
their children are Alice Maud 
Godbey and Nannie Holloway 
Godbey, Lizzie Godbey and William Godbey having died in childhood. After two years' 
service on Union Circuit, Dr. Godbey's appointments were: Washington Station, four 
years, and Labadie Circuit, where Brother Godbey secured the building of two good 
houses of worship — Salem and North's Chapel. His next appointment was Labadie and 
Washington, one year; then Washington and St. Clair, one year; Salem District, three 
years; First Church, St. Louis, two years; Page Avenue Church, St. Louis, now Cook 
Avenue, four years. Dr. Godbey raised the entire subscription, $75,000, for the Cook 
Avenue Church. In 1882, a new church paper was started in St. Louis called the 
Southwestern Methodist, and Dr. Godbey was chosen its editor, and continued to serve 
in this capacity eight years. During four years of this time, however, he continued 
to serve as a pastor. After closing his term at Page Avenue in 1883, he served Chou- 
teau Avenue one year, and Kirkwood two years. In 1890 the Southwestern Methodist 
was consolidated with the St. Louis Christian Advocate, and Dr. Godbey was trans- 
ferred to the Southwest Missouri Conference and appointed Presiding Elder of Kansas 
City District, which he held for four years. In the fall of 1894, being elected editor 
of the Arkansas Methodist, he transferred to the Little Rock Conference, and edited 
the Methodist at Little Rock for eleven years. Two years ago he returned to the 
pastorate. Dr. Godbey wrote and published "The Methodist Church Members' Manual," 
a book which has passed many editions. Soon after appeared from his pen, "Light in 
Darkness, or Missions and Missionary Heroes." This book had a sale, by subscription, 
of 50,000 in four years. Since going to Arkansas, Dr. Godbey has produced another 
book, "Foundations of Faith," a work which is now a text-book on Christian evidences 
in some of our colleges. Dr. Godbey was chairman of the delegation of the St. Louis 
Conference of 1886. He represented the Southwest Missouri Conference in 1894, and 
was chairman of the Little Rock Conference delegation in 1902 and 1906. Emory- 
College conferred on Rev. J. E. Godbey the title of D.D. in 1885. 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



365 



REV. WILLIAM RILEY MAYS, D.D. 



On with toil of heart and knees and hands, 
Thro' the long gorge to the far light has won 
His path upward, and prevail'd. — Tennyson. 



Rev. William Riley Mays, son 
of Riley Mays and Sarah Mays, 
both of whom were members of 
the Baptist Church, was born in 
Caldwell County, Missouri, April 
5th, 1843. He was converted in 
his room, all alone, in the City 
of Chicago, January 7th, 1867, 
and joined Clark Street Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, Chicago, 
under the ministry of Dr. W C. 
Dandy. He had been under con- 
viction for some time, and went 
to Chicago and was a student in 
Eastman's Business College. D. 
L. Moody had more to do with 
the shaping of his early Chris- 
tian life than any other man. 
After his conversion, he began 
active work at once, continued 
in the Lord's service for some 
years, and during all this time 
had a deep yearning for a deeper 
work of grace. He received a 
mighty baptism of the Holy 
Ghost while in school at Bos- 
ton in 1874. He was licensed to 
preach July 14th, 1873, by the 
First Methodist Episcopal 
Church Quarterly Conference, in 
Aurora, Illinois; Rev. William 
Goodfellow, D.D., Presiding El- 
der. He was recommended to 
the St. Louis Annual Conference 
by the Marvin Chapel Quarterly 
Conference of St. Louis in 1878. 
He was appointed as supply to 
Marvin Chapel by Bishop Mar- 
vin in September, 1877. He was received on trial into the St. Louis Conference 
October 13th, 1878; Rev. J. W. Lewis, D.D., Presiding Elder, and Bishop D. S. 
Doggett, presiding; ordained Local Deacon by Bishop D. S. Doggett at Charleston, 
Missouri, October 13th, 1878, having been a local preacher four years; ordained Elder 
by Bishop J. C. Granbery at Farmington, Missouri, October 15th, 1882. Appointments 
served are as follows: Marvin Chapel, St. Louis, 1877-1881; Lafayette Park, St. Louis, 
1881-1883; St. Paul's Church, St. Louis, 1883-1887; Marvin Chapel, St. Louis, 1887- 
1888; South St. Louis District, 1888-1892; St. Louis District (consolidated), 1892-1893; 
Kirkwood Station, 1893-1897; Farmington District, 1897-1901; Washington District, 
1901-1905 ; Carondelet, St. Louis, 1905-1906. During his pastorates, about one thousand 
persons have been* received into the Church. He has spent thirteen years of his 
ministry as Presiding Elder. The beautiful stone church at Kirkwood was built during 
his pastorate there, and he had something to do with building many of the churches 
in St. Louis and in the districts he served as Presiding Elder. His education was 
obtained at Rock River Seminary in Illinois, where he spent two years, and he grad- 
uated at Aurora, Illinois, before going to Boston University, where he attended the 
School of Theology for three years. He was married to Miss Mary V. Allen, October 
7th, 1886, and they have two children, W, R. Mays, Jr., and Myrtle L. Mays. Some 
of the books, aside from the Bible, which have been helpful to him, are: Thomas A. 
Kempis' "Imitation of Christ," Wesley's Journal, Fletcher's Checks, Charles G. Finney's 
Works and Bishop Tompson's Educational Essays. 




366 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV THOMAS MONROE FINNEY, D.D. 



The chamber where the good man meets his fate 

Is privileged beyond the common walk 

Of virtuous life, quite in the verge of Heaven. — Young. 

Rev. Thomas Monroe Finney, 
clergvman and philanthropist, 
was born July 13th, 1827, in St. 
Louis, Missouri. He was the 
second son of William Finney 
and Jane Finney. His education 
in primary branches was ob- 
tained in private schools in St. 
Louis. In 1840 he entered St. 
Charles College, there continu- 
ing his studies for two years. 
During the next two years he 
was a student at St. Louis Uni- 
versity, from which he was 
graduated in 1844. He then de- 
termined to continue his studies 
at Yale University and was one 
of the first three students to en- 
ter that institution from west of 
the Mississippi river. He grad- 
uated from Yale with the class 
of 1847. Returning home he 
studied law in the office of Gam- 
ble & Bates, being admitted to 
the bar in 1849. Notwithstand- 
ing the favorable auspices of 
professional life as a lawyer, he 
did not long follow that calling, 
feeling that he had a call to the 
ministry. Dr. Finney was 
licensed to preach by the Fourth 
Street Methodist Church July 
1st, 1850, and on the 10th day 
of the same month he was ad- 
mitted on trial into the St. Louis 
Conference, which held its ses- 
sion at Independence, Missouri. 
He was ordained Deacon by 
Bishop Andrew, and Elder by Bishop Kavanaugh. The degree of Doctor of Divinity 
was conferred on him in 1870 by the Southern University of Alabama. During the 
first six years of his ministry he preached successively in Saline County, at Jefferson 
City and Lexington Station, two years being at that time the limit of the pastoral 
term. In 1856 he was brought to St. Louis, and from time to time he served as pastor 
of several churches in that city. He has been recognized and honored in the Church 
as a clear, logical and forceful preacher, but his most efficient service has been rendered 
as a leader, an administrator and man of affairs. During fifteen years of his active 
ministerial work he was a Presiding Elder in St. Louis, serving first from 1861 to 1868, 
and later from 1884 to 1892. Under his administration the following churches in St. 
Louis and vicinity were built: St. John's, Lafayette Park, Marvin, Immanuel, at 
Benton, Ferguson and Kirkwood. He originated the City Mission and Church Exten- 
sion Society. From 1869 to 1872, he edited the St. Louis Christian Advocate. He was 
selected to write the life of Bishop Marvin, which is easily entitled, both for substance 
and composition, to a place among the leading biographies of the Church. Dr. Finney 
was a member of the convention which established Central College at Fayette, Missouri, 
and served as one of its curators for forty years. His worth as a leader, and adviser, 
sound in judgment and wise in counsel, was recognized by the Church at large. He 
was made President of the Board of Trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
He served with distinction as a member of the General Conference and a member of the 
Cape May Commission. Dr. Finny's character is one in which strength and beauty are 
well blended. Dr. Finney was married in 1853 to Miss Mary Shackelford of Saline 
County, Missouri, by whom he had four children — Eliza Lee, Mary Shackelford, William 
and Thomas Finnev, the two latter deceased. His wife died in 1860, and four years 
later he married Miss Lucinda Edmonstone of St. Louis Countv. by whom he had four 
children — Jennie Lou (deceased), John, Clara Beall and Bessie Barrett. 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



367 



THE HONORABLE TRUSTEN POLK. 



The Christian Faith and the Holy Scriptures arm us with the 

Means of neutralizing and repelling the assaults of evil. 

William E. Gladstone. 



Trusten Polk, Governor and 
United States Senator, was born 
May 29th, 1811, in Sussex Coun- 
ty, Delaware, son of William N. 
Polk, who was a direct descend- 
ant of Robert Polk and Magda- 
lene Polk, from whom likewise 
was descended the late Presi- 
dent, James K. Polk. He gradu- 
ated at Yale at the age of nine- 
teen with distinguished honors. 
He studied in the office of John 
Rogers, then Attorney-General 
of Maryland, and afterward at- 
tended two courses of lectures in 
the law department of Yale Uni- 
versity. In 1835, without influ- 
ence and with comparatively lit- 
tle means, he came to St. Louis. 
Even at 'that early period, St. 
Louis could boast of lawyers 
such as Bates, Napton, Ryland, 
Field, Scott and Hamilton Gam- 
ble, and it is sufficient to say of 
Trusten Polk's abilities, that he 
rose to eminence among leaders 
like these. Aside from a mind 
well grounded in the philosophy 
and principles of legal lore, he 
possessed the quick discernment 
and clear logic that instantly 
grasped the salient points of a 
case. His manner was polished 
and courtly; his personal ap- 
pearance was stately and dis- 
tinguished. In 1843 he was city 
counselor. He was elected with 
Myron Leslie on the Democratic 
ticket for member of the State Constitutional Convention. In 1848 he was one of the 
Cass and Butler Presidential electors, but took no other prominent part in public 
affairs until the great political crisis of 1856, the year of the birth of the latter day 
Republican party. Trusten Polk was the nominee of the Democracy and Robert C. 
Ewing of the American party. The canvass was extremely exciting. The contest was 
in large measure for the United States Senate, the friends of Benton nurturing the 
hope that he might carry the State and the Legislature. Polk was elected Governor, 
Benton being third in the race. Polk was inaugurated January 3rd, 1857, and ten days 
later the General Assembly met to elect a United States Senator for six years, at which 
election Governor Polk received one hundred and one votes; Thomas H. Benton, twenty- 
three, and Hamilton Gamble, thirty-four. In October, 1857, Governor Polk resigned the 
executive chair. Early in 1861 he resigned from the Senate and went to New Madrid, 
where he waited an opportunity to join his fortunes with the Confederates and subse- 
quently became Judge Advocate General of the army under General Sterling Price, with 
the rank of Colonel. In 1864 he was taken prisoner and was confined for several 
months on Johnson's Island, where he was exchanged. At the close of the war he 
returned to St. Louis and resumed the practice of law, continuing until his death, 
April 16th, 1876. Governor Polk was married in St. Louis, December 26th, 1837, to 
Miss Elizabeth N. Skinner, second daughter of Curtis Skinner and Ann Skinner. His 
children are: Anna, now Mrs. W. F. Causey, of Delaware; Mary, now Mrs. James A. 
Draper, of Delaware; Cornelia, now Mrs. John Kennard, of St. Louis, and Elizabeth, 
now Mrs. Thomas S. McPheeters, of St. Louis. Governor Polk was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and of its Annual and General Confer- 
ences. He gave his means and influence to Central College, Fayette, Missouri. He 
was a tower of strength to our educational interests. He was a man of stainless in- 
tegrity and of the purest private character. 




368 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



SKETCH OF THE WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY OF THE ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE. 




^MsB^ 



MRS. E. M. MARVIN. 



By Mrs. J. W. Evans, President. 

The first Missionary organization in the St. Louis Conference was effected at First 
Church (Eighth street and Washington avenue), November 8th, 1878. Rev. W. V. 
Tudor, D.D., Presiding Elder of the St. Louis District, presided, and the following 
officers were elected: President, Mrs. E. M. Marvin; Vice Presidents, Mrs. E. G. Boyle 
and Mrs. J. W. Lewis; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Elizabeth Avis; Recording Secre- 
tary, Mrs. E. S. Brooks; Treasurer, Mrs. F. C. Sharp. These ladies were all members 
of St. John's Church, but the twenty-eight members enrolled that day were from all 
the churches. In October, 1879, Mrs. Juliana Hayes, President of the Woman's Board 
of Foreign Missions, visited St. Louis, and on the 18th of that month organized at St. 
John's Church, Twenty-ninth and Locust streets, the Conference Society, with the 
following officers: President, Mrs. E. M. Marvin; Vice Presidents, Mrs. L. Westlake, 
Mrs. L. F. Aspley and Mrs. Moore; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Elizabeth Avis; 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. C. C. Anderson; Treasurer, Mrs. J. W. Lewis. Several 
auxiliaries were organized that year and the work was fairly started. In 1882 Mrs. 
C. C. Anderson was elected Treasurer, an office she filled to the perfect satisfaction of 
everybody concerned for fourteen years, being succeeded by Mrs. W- H. Hogan, who 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



309 



MARVIN GROUP 




Bishop Marvin. 



Dr. Morris. 



Dr. Clinton. 

Dr. Joseph Boyle. 



still holds the office, the St. Louis women believing that treasurers, like poets, "are born, 
not made." There have been six Presidents, Mrs. J. C. Granbery succeeding Mrs. 
Marvin, being in turn succeeded by Mrs. C. L. Smith, Mrs. John Matthews, Mrs. C. E. 
Patillo and' Mrs. J. W- Evans, the last being the only one who was not a preacher's wife. 
Mrs. Avis was Corresponding Secretary for eighteen years, there being only two others, 
Mrs. E. L. Holmes and Mrs. J. E. Musick. The Society will this year, 1907, hold its 
twenty-eighth annual meeting at Sikeston, having in that time sent out seven Mission- 
aries, viz: Miss Marcia Marvin, who served the Board first in Brazil, then in Cuba 
and is now resting at home; Miss Ella Granbery, who went to Brazil and is now the 
wife of Rev. H. C. Tucker, our agent of the American Bible Society there; Miss Helen 
Richardson, who is now in China, Secretary and Treasurer of the Shanghai District, 
and Principal of the McTyeire Home and School; Miss Willie Bowman, who made a 
name and place for herself in Rio de Janeiro and last year retired from the work to be 
married; Miss Ida Worth, who is in the employ of the Parent Board, teaching in the 
Lambuth Memorial in Hiroshima, Japan; Miss Emma Christine, now teaching in 
Mineiro College in Juiz de Fora, Brazil; and Miss Irene King, who is teaching in 
Sungkong, China, in the Susan B. Wilson School. These young women were sent to 
to us in answer to prayer, and our greatest reproach is that there are not more. 
The St. Louis has always been among the weaker Conference Societies, so much of its 
territory being in that sparsely settled part of Southeast Missouri, where very little of 
the territory is occupied by the Church. The women are beginning to wake up to an 
appreciation of the privilege of having a share in the grand work of bringing the world 
to Christ, and are learing that it means self-denial and work to do it. With com- 
paratively little increase in membership we have, in five years, raised our pledge to 
the general work of the Board from three hundred dollars to two thousand dollars, 
which amount we have reached for the first time this year. We know that "there 



370 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV S. P, JONES, 

Our Greatest Evangelist. 



gates.' 



Sketch of the St. Louis Conference Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 



remaineth yet very much land to be possessed," but in the name of the Lord of Hosts, 
we propose to keep up the battle against ignorance and indifference and do, as nearly 
as we can, our part toward hastening the day when "the Kingdoms of this world are 
become the Kingsdoms of our Lord, and of His Christ." 

The following are the present officers: President, Mrs. J. W Evans; First Vice 
President, Mrs. C. A. Olcott; Second Vice President, Mrs. John Garton; Treasurer, Mrs. 
W H. Hogan; Recording Secretary, Mrs. M. D. Schmalhorst; Corresponding Secretary, 
Mrs. J. E. Musick. District Secretaries: St. Louis, Mrs. M. A. Harnett, Old 

Orchard; Farmington, Mrs. J. R. Chilton, Fredericktown ; Charleston, Mrs. Joseph Lee 
Moore, Commerce; Poplar Bluff, Mrs. T. J. Bennett, Doniphan; West Plains, Mrs. 
Margaret Raub, Winona; DeSoto, Miss Nellie Murphy, St. Clair. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



371 



MRS. ELIZABETH AVIS. 



Some Christians I have known were sweeter than the breath of 
Roses in radiant June. — Dr. William A. Quayle. 



To give a record of a 
life consecrated through 
its entire length to the 
service of God is a task an 
angel might covet. We 
have all known such char- 
acters and loved them, and 
from a group in our mind, 
we are going to select one 
figure, one that stands out 
prominently, and make her 
the subject of these 
thoughts. In the morning 
of life, she gave herself 
unreservedly to the serv- 
ice of God, and as a conse- 
quence of this choice was 
eminently fitted for the 
varied stations in life as 
daughter, wife, mother, 
teacher and friend. She 
was to loved ones all that 
is embraced in each term. 
Her mind was an inex- 
haustible store-house of 
knowledge gathered from 
her long and varied ca- 
reer. From this fund she 
:reely and graciously gave 
to all who asked. Her 
life, an eventful one, was 
broadened and strength- 
ened by discipline. In joy 
or sorrow, in sunshine or 
shadow, being a fellow- 
worker with God, she ever 
exerted the might of her 
womanly influence for 
good. Especially was tins 
the case in one of her 
chosen branches of church 
work — Foreign Mission work. In this, her faith-inspired enthusiasm was an inspiration 
to all who came within the circle of her influence. Years developed sweetness and 
grace in her character; outwardly the only change they had been able to make had 
been to turn the dark locks to a silver color, for love, that great beautifier, was ever 
in her heart; hence the chisel of time failed to leave any scars on her calm, tranquil 
face; wherever she went, her presence seemed to impart a light and fragrance that 
reached upward and constantly reminds us that 

"Autumn hath violets as well as Spring, 
And age its sweetness hath as well as youth." 

p , .k?t us be teachable and learn from the life of this dear one how beautifully 
Christianity harmonizes with the varied incidents of life and character and leads them 
into a gentleness and beauty which is a part of its own characteristic. It is beyond 
human calculation to estimate the good accomplished during such a life ; as well attempt 
to count the circles of a pool into which a pebble has been thrown"; the influence of 
it goes on and on through all eternity. But we can strive to make our life loving, 
useful and self-conquering. We can honor her by imitating the qualities we admired 
m her. This is one little blossom of love offered to one whose precept and example 
have been a blessing to us, and we offer it now, remembering that "rarest blossoms, 
what can they suffice, offered to one who can no longer gaze upon their beauty." Rather 
let us "give her of the fruit of her hands and let her own works praise her in the 
gates." 




372 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



MRS. SARAH PINDALL WILFLEY. 



It is the charm of Woman's modesty and purity that holds all 
Society in its coherency. — Bishop Marvin. 



Mrs. Sarah Pindall Wilfley is 
the widow of James Franklin 
Wilfley, and the mother of Evan 
Shelby Pindall Wilfley, Lebbeus 
Redman Wilfley, Mary Morgan 
Wilfley, Xenophon Pierce Wil- 
fley and J. Douglas Wilfley. She 
is the daughter of General Evan 
Shelby and Drusilla Morgan 
Pindall, and was born September 
5th, 1840. Beginning her church 
life at ten years of age, she has 
served faithfully in Sunday 
School, Foreign Missionary and 
Home Mission work. As Confer- 
ence Corresponding Secretary,, 
she was for seven years a mem- 
ber of the Woman's Board of 
Home Missions of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. Her 
fine executive ability and clear 
conception of the needs of the 
work, coupled with faithful con- 
secrated service, soon ranked her 
a distinguished member of that 
distinguished body of women. 
She is the author of some of the 
most comprehensive laws of this 
organization. She filled various 
important places at the Annual 
meetings which were held at Lit- 
tle Rock, St. Louis, Richmond, 
Atlanta, Montgomery and Ash- 
ville. Through the courtesy of 
the Woman's Board of City Mis- 
sions of the St. Louis Confer- 
ence Society, she is an emeritus- 
life member of that body. Her 
four sons, all students of Central College, and three of them graduates of that insti- 
tution, have taken foremost rank in their chosen professions. Nor have they become so 
absorbed or blinded by their successes as to forget to live true to the principles so 
deeply implanted by their mother's Christian training, for they honor and serve the 
God she first taught them to love. This fact was strongly emphasized recently by the 
author of a mafiazine article, who, recognizing the influence of the mother on the char- 
acter of her distinguished son, Judge L. R. Wilfley, now Judge of the United States 
Court in China, when speaking of him, pays the following just and graceful tribute to 
her. "Besides being a 'gentleman unafraid,' he is the clean, wholesome type of Amer- 
ican who does not believe that ideals are a marketable commodity, so he has kept a 
surprising number of the old-fashioned notions which seem to be coming once more into 
vogue. One of them is a pronounced zeal for a clean national escutcheon. I fancy 
that the old Methodist mother back in Missouri, who is the Judge's most faithful 
American correspondent, has had more than a little to do with this. Probably it was 
from as an unassuming teacher as she that he got his simple creed: 'The greatest 
factor in life, next to honesty, is courage.' " 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



373 



REV. JOHN W. ROBINSON. 



Then on the incarnate Saviour's breast 

The fount of sweetness, they shall rest. — Keble. 






■ , y - ■-:••■ 
i- - '■:■:..::■ ' ■■• '•- 



Mi 



By Rev. John E. Godbey, D.D. 
Rev. John W Robinson was 
born in Campbell County, Vir- 
ginia, April 15th, 1824. He 
moved with his father and 
mother, William and Lucy Rob- 
inson, to Callaway County, Mis- 
souri, seven miles from Fulton 
to the farm on which Calwood 
is now built. In 1845 he mar- 
ried Miss Dorcas Griffith, the 
daughter of Asa and Elizabeth 
Griffith of St. Charles County, 
Missouri. On the 24th of 
August, 1838, he was converted 
at the Craighead camp-ground, 
three miles southwest of Fulton, 
and shortly afterwards he was 
baptized by Rev. Abram Milice 
at Captain : Anderson's on the 
Nine Mile Prairie. On May 4th, 
1847, he took the entered ap- 
prentice degree in Fulton lodge 
of the A. F. & A. M. He was 
passed June 1st, raised June 
23d, 1847. On the 10th of 
February, 1849, he was licensed 
to preach by Rev. W. W. Red- 
man, Presiding Elder of St. 
Charles District of the Missouri 
Conference, Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He was or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop John 
Early October 31st, 1855, and 
Elder by Bishop H. H. Kava- 
naugh on the 4th day of October, 
1868. In 1874 he entered on 
trial the St. Louis Annual Con- 
ference, of which he became a 

member two years afterwards. He served the Carondelet Church one year; Mount 
Olive Circuit, one year; Salem and Rolla, two years; Manchester, three years; 
Merimac Circuit, two years; Farmington, four years; Fredericktown, three years; 
Brdigeton, four years, and Clayton, four years. At the Conference held at DeSoto, 
1898, he was granted the superannuated relation. He died Saturday, September 22d, 
1900, in Chicago, age seventy-six years. The funeral took place from St. John's 
Methodist Church in St. Louis, Tuesday, September 25th, Rev. B. M. Messick, D. D., 
and Rev. J. E. Godbey, D. D., officiating. He was Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of 
Missouri, and was buried under the auspices of that order. I became acquainted 
with John W. Robinson in 1860 when I was a student in St. Charles College. Brother 
Robinson resided there and took much interest in the class of young preachers. We 
all loved him very much. He was then a local preacher in our church. Brother Rob- 
inson was a man of fine natural ability and of good literary attainments. To me 
he was always a very interesting preacher. After he became a member of the St. 
Louis Conference I was his Presiding Elder for two years. We both lived at the 
town of Salem. Never had we associates dearer to us than Brother Robinson and 
his wife, Dorcas, and his youngest daughter, Julia, than with them. Their home life 
was most beautiful. No one could excel Sister Robinson as a housekeeper and her 
husband knew that full well. He loved Dorcas with a chivalrous devotion to the 
last. When she was called home he was left as one walking alone and crying in the 
night. His children were tender and devoted to him; they were well-to-do and in 
the north or south he could make his home with them at will. I loved Brother 
Robinson; I never loved a man more; he had a gentle spirit, and he never wearied 
in the patience of hope and the labor of love. 




:J7t. 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV CHARLES MARTYR HAWKINS, D. D. 



All Christ's teaching is a Divine Poetry, luxuriant in Metaphor, 
And overflowing with Truth. — Dr. Frederick W Robertson. 



Rev. Charles Martyr Hawkins, D. D., is a native of Missouri, born at Glasgow, 
spending his childhood at Richmond and younger manhood at Warrensburg. He 
joined the Southwest Missouri Conference at Marshall, 1880, having traveled the pre- 
vious six months as supply under M. Adkisson on the Pleasant Hill Circuit. 

At the Conference of 1880 he was appointed as Junior Preacher to this same 
work. After nine months he was appointed to fill a vacancy at Washington Street, 
Kansas City, where he remained four years and three months. He then served the 
following charges, remaining four years at each, excepting the last named: Boon- 
ville, Independence, Central Church, Kansas City and Troost Avenue, Kansas City. 

In 1898 he transferred to the Baltimore Conference, serving four years each at 
Trinity, Baltimore and Greene Memorial, Roanoke, Virginia. In 1905 he transferred 
to the St. Louis Conference and was stationed at Cabanne, St. Louis, where he is now 
pastor. 

In 1883 he was married to Miss Mary A. Mathews, daughter of Rev. John 
Mathews, D. D. Four children blessed this union, all of whom are yet living: John 
Mathews, Robert Martyr, Phala and Oscar Menefee. The degree of Doctor of 
Divinity was conferred upon him by the Missouri State University, 1897. 

Every pastorate of Dr. Hawkins has been marked by large in-gatherings into 
the Church and full financial reports. His gifts as a revivalist have led to his helping 
a number of brother pastors each year in meetings which, almost without exception, 
have resulted in large visible results. 

Dr. Hawkins is a man of fine social qualities and his presence graces any social 
evening. He has a pleasing voice and in pulpit utterance he knows how to use his 
voice with the best effect. He thinks in symbols and hence it is easy and pleasing 
for an audience to follow him. His power of statement is strong and this is» enforced 
by apt illustration. The truth is mighty in his hand. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



375 




MR. CHARLES HIRAM LANHAM. 



All that love to our fellow-man can prompt finds itself only a 
Copy of That Life which was spent in continually Doing 
Good. — Dr. Cunningham Geikie. 



Mr. Charles Hiram Lanham was born January 10th, 1858, at New Albany, In- 
diana. He is the son of Hiram Lanham and Ann E. Lanham, members o± the 
Methodist Church. His mother, who is still living, has been a Methodist for more 
than sixty years. He was converted in his own room in 1882 and joined bt. Johns 
Church St. Louis, and was a member there for a few months but joined Centenary 
Church December 31st, 1882, where he is still a member. He was convicted of sin, 
and while reading one of Bishop William Taylor's books was shown the way of salva- 
tion. He laid the book aside, knelt at his bedside, and was converted. Shortly alter 
his conversion, and while reading "The Christian's Secret of a Happy Lite, by 
Hannah Whitehall Smith, he gave himself to God in a full consecration, and since 
that day has never had a desire to withdraw the consecration. God accepted the 
offering and the word of God became another book to him. God gave him the wit- 
ness of his consecration and fulfilled His promise in giving him the Comforter. Mis 
education was received principally in the public schools. He was a delegate to the 
World's Third Sunday School Convention which met in London. He went with the 
delegation from North America on the Catalonia of the Cunard line. He considers 
the time when the subject of a full surrender to God was first presented to him 
and he understood what it was as the most importance event m his life. Some of the 
books which have been most helpful to him, aside from the Bible, are The Christian s 
Secret of a Happy Life," "Interior Life," "Life of Alfred Cookman," Wesley s Ser- 
mons, "Life of Amanda Smith," and "Biographies of Godly Men and Women He 
has been a member of Centenary church for more than twenty-four years, and has 
been honored by the church as a class-leader, Sunday School Superintendent, Steward 
and Sabbath School teacher. He is now Secretary of the Board of Stewards and 
also Treasurer of the Board of Missions of the St. Louis Conference. 



37 6 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- WILLIAM COURT, A. B., B. D. 



It is the grand distinction of humanity that it is made permeable 
By the Divine Nature, prepared in that manner to receive and 
Entemple the Infinite Spirit. — Dr. Bushnell. 



Rev. William Court was born 
April 28th, 1869, at St. Louis, 
Missouri. He is a son of William 
Court and Julia Court. His 
parents had been brought up in 
the German Evangelical Church. 
He was converted in a little 
chapel on Russell Avenue in St. 
Louis, where Rev. J. J. Watts 
labored for a number of years. 
It was during special services 
conducted by Rev. Richard Gar- 
rison that he was converted 
June 6th, 1886. He joined Mar- 
vin Church, St. Louis, August 
22d, 1886. All his life he had 
shown inclination to be re- 
ligious, though not always good. 
He realized his need of,,, salva- 
tion when seventeen years of 
age. It was a struggle for him 
to fix his mind on the one thing 
needful, but the Spirit gave 
help and he entered into the ex- 
perience of forgiveness with 
great quiet in his soul. His re- 
ligious experience has not al- 
ways been satisfactory, but a 
desire to honor God with his 
service and life has kept him in 
union with His love. All of his 
movements have been actuated 
by a single motive — to serve 
man in larger service of love 
and faith to God. He was 
granted license to exhort by the 
Quarterly Conference of Marvin 
Chapel church in 1889, and granted license to preach by the same Quarterly Confer- 
ence June 8th, 1891. He was recommended to the Annual Conference by the Nashville 
District Conference in 1900 and was received into the St. Louis Annual Conference in 
1900; Rev. James W Lee, D. D., Presiding Elder, and Bishop John C. Granbery, pre- 
siding. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop O. P. Fitzgerald at Nashville, Tennessee, 
in 1897; was ordained Elder by Bishop Warren A. Candler at Fredericktown, Mis- 
souri, in 1901. He has served the following appointments: Higbee Circuit, 1894-1897; 
Bellvue Circuit, 1897-1898; Cabanne charge, 1900-1901; transferred to Japan Mission 
Conference and appointed teacher at Kobe, Japan, 1901-1902; principal of Palmore 
Institute, Kobe, Japan, 1902-1905; home on enforced leave of absence due to Mrs. 
Court's health, 1905-1906; transferred to St. Louis Conference and appointed to Grand 
Avenue Church. 1906-1907. He has received about one hundred and twenty-five per- 
sons into the church. He attended the public schools in St. Louis, Central College, 
graduating with A. B. degree in 1897, and Vanderbilt University, Theological Depart- 
ment, taking B. D. degree in 1900. He was married to Miss Cora May Trawick on 
April 18th, 1901, and they have one little boy, Andrew Trawick Court. He says his 
missionary experience is the sweetest page of his life's history and he would rather 
give his strength in the far-off country, if God permitted, than be in the place so 
many deem as "home." Some of the books which have helped him most are "Pilgrim's 
Progress," "With Christ." bv Andrew Murray, "The New Acts of the Apostles," and 
"Sermons for the New Life." 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



377 




REV THEODORE COPELAND. 



The highest Reason ends in Faith. — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. Theodore Copeland, son of S. V. Copeland and Mary J. Copeland, was born 
November 18th, 1867, at Blountsville, Alabama. Both parents were members ot the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He was converted in 1889 at Greensboro, 
Alabama, under the ministry of Rev. J. B. Culpepper. His growth m grace has been 
gradual but persistent and progressive. Forgetting the things that are behind he is 
pressing forward to Christian perfection. He was licensed to preach m 189U by tne 
Quarterly Conference of First Church of Birmingham, Alabama; Rev. V O. Hawkins, 
Presiding Elder, and Rev. C. B. Riddick, D. D., preacher in charge; the same Quar- 
terly Conference recommended him to the Annual Conference for admission on trial, 
and he was received into the Annual Conference in 1891 ; Rev. L. A. Daisey, Presiding 
Elder, and Bishop Galloway presiding; ordained Deacon by Bishop Duncan in JNovem- 
ber, 1893, at Talladega, Alabama; ordained Elder by Bishop Galloway in November, 
1895, at Gadsden, Alabama. His education was obtained at Southern University, 
Greensboro, Alabama, and at Vanderbilt University. He was married to Miss Kate 
Phillips July 6th, 1892, and they have two children, Theo. Copeland, and Phillips 
Copeland. 



378 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- JOHN W. CUNNINGHAM. 



The pure in heart shall see God forever and the widening vision 
Shall fill the redeemed, soul and body, with light. 

— Bishop Hendrix. 




Rev. John W. Cun- 
ningham was born at 
Leitchfield, Kentucky, 
June 12th, 1824; lived 
there till near fifteen 
years old, when he en- 
tered the store of his 
brother at Elizabeth- 
town. His education 
in the village school 
house was spelling, 
reading, arithmetic, 
writing and English 
grammar. After more 
than a year in the 
store he spent ten 
months in the Green 
River High School at 
Bowling Green. He re- 
turned to the store 
July, 1841. In 1800 
his mother became a 
Presbyterian, and later 
a Cumberland Presby- 
terian. His religious 
associations were with 
those people before he 
was nineteen and a 
half years old. He was 
converted at a revival 
in the Methodist 
Church at Elizabeth- 
town about noon, on 
February 1st, 1844. 
Two months later he 
was a class leader; 
July 6th was licensed 
to preach; was received 
on trial in the Ken- 
tucky conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal 
Church and preached 
his first sermon as 
junior preacher with 
Rev. A. H. Redford at Augusta, where was then the oldest college in Methodism, 
whose first President, Martin Ruter, was the first Methodist Doctor of Divinity, and 
as a "Doctor" he preached in the Methodist Church in Augusta arrayed in a black 
silk gown. The young preacher spent his first two years in Mason and Bracken 
counties. September 17th he was united in marriage with Miss Samantha S. Ingram. 
After nearly sixty-one years of married life she is with him. He was ordained 
Deacon by Bishop Soule in 1846 and Elder by Bishop Capers in 1848. He served 
Methodism in the Kentucky and Louisville Conferences, on Circuits, Stations and Dis- 
trict, twenty-five years. In January, 1866, he became editor of the Kentucky 
Department of the Christian Advocate of St. Louis, Missouri, and Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, and did the work for that Department and of a pastor nearly four years, living 
three years of the time in Louisville. Before and after the period indicated the paper 
was known as the "St. Louis Christian Advocate." In September, 1869, he came to 
Missouri with a certificate of location and was received into the Missouri Confer- 
ence. After three years at Palmyra, one at Chillicothe, and two at St. Charles he 
retired at his request by location in September, 1875, and has been nearly thirtv years 
a local Elder in Centenary Church, St. Louis. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



379 



REV WILLIAM PEERY GIBSON. 



He took kindly to every aspect of the life which God and 
Nature gave him. — Dr. D. R. McAnally. 



Rev. William Peery Gibson 
was born December 5th, 1825, 
in Taswell County, West Vir- 
ginia. His parents, John Gib- 
son and Cynthia Peery Gibson, 
were life-long members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 
He was converted in 1836 in old 
Taswell Court House under the 
ministry of Rev. Mr. Weaver. 
He united with the church at 
the same time and place. There 
is no incident, he says, that 
lingers in his memory to com- 
pare with the one which took 
place the night when God for 
Christ's sake, pardoned his sins. 
He looks back to that hour now 
as the most supreme moment of 
his long life. Since being a mil- 
itant in the army of the Lord 
for seventy years he has 
learned many of the arts of 
this life of warfare. He has 
camped on battlefields, crossed 
lances with enemies, van- 
quished foes, and although a 
little bronzed by burning suns, 
he says that he stands with his 
feet on higher ground than ever 
before. And now, after the 
battle and the strife, in the 
serene and calm evening of life, 
he is expecting and looking for 
that abundant entrance through 
the beautiful gates. He was 
licensed to preach in 1849 in 
Jefferson County, Missouri; the 
preacher in charge was Rev. 
John Buren, his uncle, and Rev. 

Mr. Roberts was the Presiding Elder; he was received into the Annual Conference in 
1849; Rev. Mr. Roberts, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Jones presiding. He was or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop Beverly Waugh in 1851, at Hannibal, Missouri; he was 
ordained Elder by Bishop David S. Doggett in 1867 at Arcadia, Missouri. He has 
served the following appointments: Steelville Circuit, two years; Cape Girardeau, 
one year; Oregon Circuit was his next appointment, but on account of wife s illness 
could not go and asked for a location; after some years he again entered the travel- 
ing connection, about 1875; from this time he served Piedmont Station four years; 
Marquand, four years; Oakridge, one year; Benton, two years; Bellview Circuit, one 
year; Richwoods, two years. He has witnessed many conversions and has been 
blessed by taking many into the church. He received his education in the Jest country 
schools of his day. He was married to Miss Augusta Thomas, August 7th, l»bi, ana 
his children are Mrs. Mary Gibson Townsend and Mrs. Lucy Gibson Thornburgh. iwo 
sons, John Emery Gibson and William Howard Gibson, died in childhood W esley s 
"Notes," Clark's "Commentaries," and Fletcher's "Appeal," are books which have 
greatly helped him. Brother Gibson writes: "In this the evening time oi lite l am 
biding my time, serving the Lord as best I can. I am very happily situated my every 
want is looked after by loving, devoted children. I spend my summers at Fotosi ana 
Belgrade, Missouri, with my oldest daughter, Mrs. Charles S. Townsend, ana ner 
children, in whose homes I am monarch of all I survey. My winters I spena witn my 
youngest daughter in this the city of roses, Little Rock, Arkansas. Her husbana, non. 
George Thornburgh, of Sunday School fame, lives for the good he can do numaimy. 
He is Superintendent of the largest Sunday school in the State and gives the oest 
energies of his life to this work." 




383 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JOHN RUDOLPH EDDLEMON. 



The Christ-life seizes all the soul, and fires it with the glory of 
Assured and perpetual triumph. — Dr. William A. Quayle. 



Rev. John Rudolph Eddlemon 
was born in Perry County, Mis- 
souri, November 2nd, 1838. His 
father, Joseph F. Eddlemon, was 
a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, and 
his mother, Belinda Eddlemon, 
was a member of the Presby- 
terian Church, but afterward 
joined the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, with her hus- 
band. He was converted at 
Mount Pleasant camp ground, 
near the place of his birth, when 
about eleven years old, at a 
meeting conducted by Rev. D. 
W. Pollack, Presiding Elder, 
and Rev. J. M. Proctor, the 
pastor in charge. His conver- 
sion was the culmination of im- 
pressions beginning with 
the earliest recollections. The 
family altar was really the 
place, he says, of earliest re- 
ligious life. He always enjoyed 
all of the means of grace and 
does not remember, even in his 
youth, to have neglected, or 
wilfully refused to hear preach- 
ing or to attend prayer meet- 
ing and class meeting when he 
had the opportunity. He loved 
the preachers and their visits to 
his father's house were always 
a delight to him. He was li- 
censed to preach at an appoint- 
ment a few miles west of Fort 
Scott, Kansas, on the Fort 
Scott Mission; Rev. Charles Boles, Presiding Elder, and Rev. Arthur Hawkins, 
preacher in charge in 1869; the same Quarterly Conference recommended him to the 
Annual Conference in 1869. He was received on trial into the St. Louis Conference 
in the fall of 1869; Rev. Charles Boles, Presiding Elder, and Bishop Pierce, presiding. 
He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Doggett October 15th, 1871, at St. Louis, Missouri; 
ordained Elder by Bishop Wightman, October 19th, 1873, at Charleston, Missouri. He 
has served the following appointments: Bloomgarden, 1869-1870; Salem Circuit, 1870- 
1872; Marble Hill, 1872-1874; Plattin Circuit, 1874-1876; York Chapel and Mount 
Pleasant, 1876-1877; Bloomfield Circuit, 1877-1878; Lutesville Circuit, 1878-1880; Jack- 
son and Cape Girardeau, 1880-1881; Lutesville, 1881-1883; Merimac Circuit, 1883-1886; 
Washington and New Haven, 1886-1888; Potosi Circuit, 1888-1892; New Haven, 1892- 
1896; Potosi, 1896-1898; Fredericktown, 1898-1900; Poplar Bluff District, 1900-1902; 
Bellefontaine and Coldwater, 1902-1906; Mount Zion and Trinity, his present charge. 
He has received into the church about four hundred persons. Under his pastorate two 
churches on the Marble Hill charge were built; a parsonage at Marble Hill; parsonage 
at Potosi. and others were begun, finished, improved and repaired on charges he has 
served. His education was received in the country schools, the Arcadia High School 
and the Academy at DeSoto, Missouri. He was married to Miss Mary Abernathy 
September 16th, 1879, and one little girl was born to them, Jessie Eddlemon. 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



381 



REV RUFUS A. HOLLOWAY. 



His name shall stand forever; 

That name to us is Love. — James Montgomery. 



Rev. Rufus A. Holloway was 
born May 20th, 1849, at Ellis- 
ville, St. Louis County, Missouri. 
His parents, William Holloway 
and Elizabeth Holloway, were 
both members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He 
joined the church at Lewis 
Chapel in 1865 under the min- 
istry of Rev. J. E. Godbey, D. 

D. About two years later he 
was converted while attending 
school at Washington, Missouri 
— Washington High School, un- 
der the management of Rev. J. 

E. Godbey, D. D. His conver- 
sion was bright and happy while 
crossing the street in the town 
of Washington. He had been 
in distress for a week and was 
earnestly seeking the Lord in 
secret by prayer and searching 
the Scriptures. It marked a 
new era in his life. All nature 
seemed to have received a fresh 
touch from the hand of the 
Creator. His growth in grace 
has been somewhat regular, with 
here and there a fresh impetus 
given by a good meeting, a 
spell of seeking a baptism of 
the Holy Spirit leading to a 
fuller consecration. He was li- 
censed to preach in April, 1870, 
by the Quarterly Conference of 
Washington Circuit, Rev. J. E. 
Godbey, D. D., preacher in 




charge, and Rev. J. H. Boyle, D. , , , ■ t t u p Annual 

D., Presiding Elder; the same Quarterly Conference recommended h, m to the An 

Conference for admission on trial in September, 18 ^ , was receivea into 

St. Louis Conference, afterwards the Southwest Missouri ««g Mt tos«^ 




Missouri; was ordamed Elde rby tfisnop J. o. iveemu ™ r\^r CWcnit 1S1U Clinton, 
Missouri. He has served the following charges: Nevada City Circu: > Versailles Sta- 
1872; Westport, 1873; Westport and Belton, 1874; Warrensburg 1 ^; i ^ B ^ ls82 ; 
tion, 1876-1877 Independence Station, 1878-1879; Sedaha, 1880, Waverly, iaai , 

Marshall, 1883^1884; Staten, 1885; Gilliam 1886;. Stater [Station, ^887 ^ J id 
fensburg, 1889-1890; Citra, Florida, 1891-1894; Live Oak 1895 M d iso n ^ 

1896-1897; Batesville, Arkansas, 1898-1899; Mananna, 1900-1901 ,mtneiaii o 
took a supernumerary relation/but served DeVallo Bluff for nine months same 
tion in fall of 1903, but preached three months at Crosse t, Arkansas, ^in Decern , 
1904, he was appointed to Keatchil Louisiana ; stationed a t jWinnfleW -L^ 8 ^' Citra, 
1907. The church at Belton and parsonages at Staten Warren^Durg 
Florida, were all built under his pastorates. He attended th ® J7 a ^ t |™ ber 21st, 
School, at Washington, Missouri. He was married to Miss E^ Dmt, bepte ™ lloway 
1875. The following children were born of this marriage: Edgar K™&> 
John Lewis Holloway. Rufus Emory Holloway, Mary HoUoway and Ehzabetn ^^ 
way. Among the books that have helped him he names Wesley s a ™ vv rhildreT1 " by 
mons," Drummonds "Natural Law," "Training of the Twelve, uur on ' rden> 

Haygood, "The Crisis of Missions," and of late years the works of Dr. a. v. 



3S2 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV ZACHARY TAYLOR McCANN. 



The only hope of the world's Redemption is in co-operation 
With God. — Bishop Hendrix. 






Rev. Zachary Taylor McCann, 
son of Michael L. McCann and 
Catherine McCann, was born in 
Talladega County, Alabama, 
September 1st, 1848. His par- 
ents moved to Arkansas in 1857. 
He was converted at a camp- 
meeting near Arkadelphia, 
Arkansas, under the ministry of 
Dr. A. R. Winfield. There was 
nothing at all strange about his 
conversion. From childhood he 
had been taught to love the 
church and the ministry, and at 
this camp-meeting he gave his 
hand to the church and his 
heart to God, fully, without re- 
serve, and at the same time re- 
solved to give his whole life to 
the work of the ministry and at 
once began to prepare for his 
life work. He was licensed to 
preach by the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Tulip Circuit, Little 
Rock Conference, November 
16th, 1872; Rev. A. Minor, 
preacher in charge, and Dr. A. 
R. Winfield, Presiding Elder. 
The same Quarterly Conference 
recommended him to the Annual 
Conference for admission on 
trial at the same time, with the 
same preacher in charge and 
same Presiding Elder; was re- 
ceived into the Annual Confer- 
ence on trial December 3rd, 
1872; Dr. A. R. Winfield, Presiding Elder, and Bishop H. N. McTyeire, presiding; 
ordained Deacon by Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh in Monticello, Arkansas, November 
29th, 1874; ordained Elder by Bishop J. C. Keener at Arkadelphia, Arkansas, Decem- 
ber 5th, 1876. Appointments filled: Hamburg Circuit, 1873; Perryville Circuit, 
1874; Mt. Ida Circuit, 1875; Holly Grove Circuit, 1876; Dallas Circuit, 1877; Locks- 
bury Circuit, 1878; Little Rock Circuit, 1879; Carlisle Circuit, 1880; Colleyville Cir- 
cuit, 1881-1882; Hickory Circuit, 1883-1885; Des Arc Station, 1886-1887; Lehigh Cir- 
cuit, 1888-1889; New Edinburg, 1890-1891; transferred to St. Louis Conference in 
1901, and stationed at Dexter and Maiden; Dexter and Maiden, 1892-1893; Caruthers- 
ville Circuit, 1894; supernumerary 1895; Doniphan Circuit, 1896-1899; Potosi Circuit, 
1899; Fredericktown Station, 1900-1902; Bridgeton Circuit, 1902-1905; Immanuel Sta- 
tion, 1906. Nineteen hundred and seventy-three persons have been received into the 
church under his ministry. Two churches and two parsonages have been built or re- 
modeled under his pastorates. He received his education in the public and private 
schools of Arkansas. He was married to Miss Fannie Wade, February 3rd, 1881, 
and their children are: Wade L. McCann, Carrie E. McCann, Earl C. McCann, Roy 
O. McCann, M. Floy McCann, Ruth L. McCann, Fannie P. McCann, Dorothy T. Mc- 
Cann and Willard O. McCann. He considers his conversion, which changed his whole 
life from politics to that of the ministry, as the most important crisis in his life. 
"Fletcher's Appeal" and "Watson's Institutes" are two of the books, aside from the 
Bible, that have greatly helped him in his Christian life. 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



383 



REV CHARLES EUGENE DE VINNEY. 



Our Good Shepherd never puts us forth to the work or warfare 
Of any day without going before us. — Dr F B. Meyer. 



Rev. Charles Eugene De Vin- 

ney was born at Nashville, 

Tennessee, March 2nd, 1847. 

He departed this life at mid- 
night April 21st, 1906. His boy- 
hood and youth were spent in the 

City of Nashville, and other 

parts of Tennessee, Kentucky 

and Indiana. Shortly after the 

close of the Civil war his par- 
ents came to St. Louis, when, 

after a few years, they decided 

to return to the Southland. 

Scarcely had the Stonewall made 

the first hundred miles of her 

trip, when a terrible catastrophe 

occurred. On the night of Octo- 
ber 27th, 1869, her boilers blew 

up, and she burned almost to 

the water's edge. Many lives 

were lost, among whom were the 

parents of C. E. De Vinney, a 

little brother and sister. Sad 

though it was, he pressed on 

with renewed zeal, a valliant 

soldier for his Lord and Master, 

against all odds. On June 21st, 

1870, he was recommended by 

the Leaders Meeting of Wesley 

Chapel, St. Louis, for license, 

and authorized to preach, being 

then in his twenty- third year. 

Rev. Dr. Boyle was Presiding 

Elder of the District at that 

time. Two years later he was 

ordained Deacon by Bishop 
George F. Pierce, at Arcadia, 
Missouri. On October 18th, 
1874, he was ordained Elder by Bishop J. C. Keener at Caledonia, Missouri. He was 
married to Miss Leeanah Gourley, November 19th, 1873. The union was blessed with 
six children, two sons and four daughters. During his active ministry he served the 
following charges: Manchester, Saint Clair, Steelville, Potosi, Bloomneld, Licking, 
New Madrid, Benton, Marquand, Doniphan, Arcadia and West Plains. As a preacher, 
he was thoughtful, strong and spiritual. His sermons were prepared with great care, 
realizing as he did the importance of the message he brought the people. 11 any 
special line of work was characteristic of our departed brother, it was his breaking 
the Bread of Life to the poor. Truly he was the friend of the friendless. No home 
was too lowly for him to enter and minister to the sick, bury the dead, and comtort 
the bereaved, and no distance was too great for him to go to do this labor oi love. 
Perhaps his desire to do this particular line of work was due to his own bereavement 
early in life— the loss of loved ones. Rev. C. E. De Vinney was a member oi the bt. 
Louis Conference thirtv-six years, sixteen of which he spent in the itineracy. During 
these years he wrought well in the vineyard of the Master and with other heroic men 
helped lay the foundation of our church in Southeast Missouri. Durmg the eleven 
latter years of his life, he was totally blind, but in the darkness of his natural 
vision, he lost not that faith which takes hold on the Eternal, and during these weary 
years of suffering he "endured as seeing Him who is invisible/' and looked tor the 
"city that hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God." 




334 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




REV. ARTHUR MATHER, D. D. 



Videte qualem charitatem debit nobis Pater. — St. John. 
Behold what manner of Love the Father hath bestowed upon us. 

The Rev. Arthur Mather, D. D., hails from Great Britain, and was born at 
Rawdon, near the city of Leeds, in the County of York. His family has been iden- 
tified with Methodism from its earliest days; his kinsman, Alexander Mather, hav- 
ing been ordained a General Superintendent by John Wesley himself, and was the 
second President of the Conference after Mr. Wesley's death. 

Dr. Mather joined the Wesleyan Methodist Church in 1880 at the Carlisle Road 
Church in the Bradford (Mannungham) Circuit. He began to preach in the year 
1885, and was admitted on Full Plan as a Local preacher in 1887, under the min- 
istry of the Rev. Joseph Nettleton. 

After completing his education he adopted the profession of Expert Accountant 
and followed this until entering the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

He came to this country in 1899, and after a brief stay in the city of Philadel- 
phia, came to Missouri, and joined the St. Louis Annual Conference. His appoint- 
ments have been as follows: Supply on the old Gayoso Circuit, Hayti, St. Louis 
(Immanuel), and Assistant Secretary of the Board of Church Extension at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, which latter appointment he now holds. 

Dr. Mather was educated at the Rawdon National School, the Belle Vue High 
School at Bradford, Yorks, the Bradford Municipal College, and South Kensington, 
London. 

He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Galloway, and Elder by Bishop Hendrix. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him by Morris- 
ville College in 1905. 

Dr. Mather married in 1891 Miss Martha Bradley, the eldest daughter of Thomas 
Bradley, Esq., of Bradford, Yorks, and has two sons named resepctively Thomas 
Bradley and John Waterhouse Mather. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



385 



REV WILLIAM M. LEFTWICH, D. D. 

They do not die who leave their thought imprinted on some 
Deathless page. — Thomas Bailey Aldrich. 



By Bishop 0. P. Fitzgerald. 

If asked by what right 

Dr. Leftwich is accorded 

a place in this volume, the 

answer is: Dr. Leftwich 

was a Missouri Method- 
ist. The prime of his 

manhood was given to the 

service of the Church in 

Missouri. In Missouri he 

grew into strength and ef- 
fectiveness as a preacher. 

The associations he formed 

in Missouri were cherished 

by him tenderly all his 

life. He carried Missouri 

in his heart. Missouri 

holds him in her heart to- 
day as one of her sons. 

It is the heart of a mother 

whose children have felt 

with joy the clasp of her 

loving arms, whose hearts 

turn back to her wherever 

they wander. 
The Missourians in early 

California days were 

many, and they were Mis- 
sourians to the very last. 
Dr. Leftwich married 

a Missouri maiden, who 

thenceforward was his 
help-meet, his traveling 
companion, the light of 
his home and the mother 
of his children. God bless 
their living children, and 
be with them to the latest 
generation, and bring them 
all "Home" at last. 

Missouri, Virginia, Cal- 
ifornia, Tennessee and 
Heaven, touch in my 
thought when I think of 
Dr. Leftwich. He was of 
the stock of the Leftwichs 
? +j ? ed £ ord hills, in Virginia. They were a virile, aggressive race, valued and 
trusted by friends and dreaded by foes. When Methodism struck them, it found con- 
genial soil. It was the very thing that fitted their traditions and met their needs. 
it was no wonder that our Leftwich, the young lawyer, when he was converted, should 
become a Methodist preacher. 

Dr - Leftwich was born in Bedford County, Virginia, November 6th, 1828. When 
quite young his family moved to Maury County, Tennessee, and located about four 
miles from Columbia. 

His boyhood days, until he went to college, were spent on the farm. When quite 
W? +• ent |T ed Emory and Henry College, Virginia, and was an alumnus of that 
institution He practiced law for three years after leaving college, one year in 
lexas, and two years in Missouri. At the end of his third year in the law, he 
aetermmed to enter the ministry, and did so. In 1851 he was married to Miss Mary 
»* r* ? Wellington, Missouri; entered the St. Louis Conference in 1853; was 
« different periods connected with the Missouri and Tennessee Conferences; for the 
*ast eight years of his life was engaged mostly in the evangelistic work. 




386 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV ROY P BASLER. 



Christ is a great Specialist, and He is leaving a multitude to 
Arrive at a Man. — Dr. William A. Quayle. 



Rev. Roy P, Basler was born in Brownsbow, Oldham County, Kentucky, July 14th, 
1877. When he was three years of age his parents moved to Louisville, Kentucky, 
where he was reared. He finished the graded school course there at fourteen, and 
from that time until he was about twenty years old, he worked at various things, 
from office work to bridge building. During these years he was brought in contact 
with religious influences, both at home and in his association with men in the social 
and industrial life. The conversion of some ten or fifteen men of his acquaintance, 
and their subsequent zeal, made a deep impression on him, as did also the preaching 
of some Baptist ministers who conducted the meeting in which these men were con- 
verted. This was during his eighteenth and nineteenth years; however, he withstood 
conviction until the beginning of his twenty-first year. He was converted on August 
17th, 1897, and was immediately given work to do in the church. He was licensed to 
preach in April, 1898, by the Louisville District Conference. He entered Vanderbilt 
Training School at Elkton, Kentucky, in September, 1899, and finished in June, 1902. 
He entered Vanderbilt University, Academic Department, in September, 1902, and fin- 
ished the Sophomore year in June, 1904. During these years he supplied Fairview 
Circuit, Louisville Conference, summer of 1900; West Broadway, Louisville, summer of 
1902; South Louisville, spring and summer of 1903; Valley Park and Fenton, St. Louis 
Conference., summer of 1904. He was received into the St. Louis Conference on trial 
September, 1904, and appointed to Sloan Mission at same Conference; re-appointed 
to same in September, 1905, and was married to Miss Mary D. Olsen, a Deaconess, 
January 14th, 1906; was re-appointed to Sloan Mission in September, 1906. Sloan Mis- 
sion, now named Kingdom House, is Institutional, supported by the Church Extension 
Society and the Women's Home Missionary Society of the St. Louis District. They 
strive to do the four-fold work of The Kingdom — Social, Philanthropic, Educational and 
Evangelistic. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



387 



REV. THOMAS MILTON PATTERSON. 



I believe that in Christendom the movement of the ages is a true 
Progress. — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. Thomas M. Patterson, 
son of William Patterson and 
Lydia Patterson, was born in 
Illinois, March 4th, 1858. He 
was converted in the winter of 
1873, in Schuyler County, Mis- 
souri, under the ministry of 
Rev. J. W. Perry, and united 
with the M. E. Church, South, 
the church of his parents, at the 
same time and place. From in- 
fancy he had religious impres- 
sions, but joy and satisfaction 
came to him in the hour of con- 
version. His growth in grace 
has been gradual. He says: "I 
grow in the knowledge of God 
daily, by the study of His word, 
and the 'Spirit taking the 
things of the Father and show- 
ing them unto me.' As I grow 
in the knowledge of God, I grow 
in His moral image. I am not 
yet perfect, but am reaching 
thereunto." Brother Patterson 
was licensed to preach by the 
Quarterly Conference of the 
Queen City Circuit and was ad- 
mitted on trial into the Missouri 
Conference at Louisiana, Mis- 
souri, 1879, Rev. W. W. Mc- 
Murry, presiding elder, and 
Bishop Wightman, presiding. 
He was ordained Deacon by 
Bishop Granbery in 1882, and 

elder by Bishop Parker two — - — 

years later. With the exception of a few years spent in Oklahoma on account of his 
health, Brother Patterson's life work has been in the Missouri and St. Louis Confer- 
ences. Conversions under his ministry are numbered by the hundreds, and niany 
churches and parsonages have been remodeled and improved during his pastorate. The 
beautiful church at Cowgill, Missouri, stands as a monument to his untiring energy 
and perseverance; other churches and parsonages having been also built under his wise 
leadership. On January 8th, 1884, he was married to Miss Dena Kuhne, of Troy.. 
Missouri, and two daughters, Laneta Patterson and Naomi Patterson, have blessed this 
union. Brother Patterson regards yielding to the call to the ministry the most im- 
portant crisis in his life. He had resisted the call for years, and did not yield until the 
death of his father, failure in business, and defeat in other lines in 1876 led him to 
make a thorough consecration of his life to God. Wesley's Sermons and Clark s Com- 
mentaries are books that have been helpful to him. 




383 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV WILLIAM B. NORTH, PH.D. 



The more exalted our conception of the God we worship, the 
Nobler will be our estimate of Man. — Bishop Galloway. 

-—— Rev. William B. North, son 

of Rev. John Wesley North, D. 
D., and Martha Jane I. North, 
both of whom were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, was born April 
2nd, 1859, at Hickory Grove, 
South Carolina. He was con- 
verted and joined the church 
on probation in 1868 at Shelby, 
North Carolina, under the min- 
istry of Rev. A. P Avant. At 
Sharon camp meeting in the 
same circuit he was regenerated 
in 1874. The beautiful Christ- 
ian example and godly admoni- 
tion of his parents, his step- 
mother, Cynthia J. North, in- 
cluded, brought him to God. He 
was licensed to preach August 
7th, 1880, by the Laurinburg 
Quarterly Conference. Rev. H. 
T. Hudson, D. D., in the absence 
of Rev. L. L. Hendren, D. D., 
Presiding Elder, conducted the 
examination. The same Quar- 
terly Conference recommended 
him for admission on trial into 
the North Carolina Conference 
in November, 1880; received in- 
to the North Carolina Confer- 
ence on trial December 3rd, 
1880; Bishop J. C. Keener, pre- 
siding; ordained Deacon by 
Bishop John C. Keener at Ral- 
eigh, North Carolina, December 
11th, 1882; ordained Elder by 
at i_ no- ,oo, * • • Bishop Linus Parker, D. D., 

November 30th, 1884. Appointments served: North Carolina Conference* Mont- 
gomery Circuit, 1880-1881; Smithville Station, 1881-1883; Scotland Neck Station, 1883- 
1884; Weldon and Halifax Station, 1884-1886; Warren Circuit, 1886-1887; Rocky 
Mount and Battleboro, 1887-1888; Chapel Hill Station, 1888-1890; Chair of Mental 
and Moral Science in University of North Carolina, 1889-1890; West Plains Station 
St. Louis Conference, 1890-1891; Sedalia Station, 1891-1892; Jefferson City Station, 
1892-1893; Waverly Station, 1893-1894; Jackson Station, 1894-1895; Sikeston Station, 
1895-1896; West Plains District, 1896-1900; Charleston District, 1900-1903; DeSoto 
Station, 1903-1905; Clayton Station, 1905-1907. About ninteen hundred and twenty- 
one persons have been received into the church under his ministry. Nine churches 
have been built and two repaired or rebuilt under his pastorates. He was educated 
at the Shelby High School, North Carolina, Wofford College, South Carolina, Ruth- 
erford College, North Carolina, Chautauqua University, The Chicago Correspondence 
School of Law, and Vanderbilt University. Hoping to be able to arrange to take a 
course of very high grade in Harvard University, his application papers on examina- 
tion were approved by the Harvard University Examining Committee, which admitted 
him as a candidate for the degree of Master of Arts, but his financial condition 
was such that he was unable to go to Harvard. He received the degree of A. B., 
A. M. and Ph.D. in the regular courses leading to them from Rutherford College, 
when it was the largest institution of learning in North Carolina, graduated in a 
special course of Science and Literature from Chautauqua University, took a course 
of law and Theology at Rutherford College, and a short course of Theology at Van- 
derbilt University. He was very happily married to Miss Emma A. Stern. January 14th, 
1893, and their children are Gladstone Keener North (now deceased), Paul Henry 
North and Martha Lee North. The greatest crisis in his life was yielding to the 
call to the ministry. The works of Wesley, Watson, Ralston, McClintock and Strong, 
Henry Ward Beecher, the great writers on modern Science and Philosophy, Wheeden* 
Spurgeon, Gladstone, Parker and Watkinson have been a erreat help to him in at- 
tempting to discharge the sacred trust committed to his hands. 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



389 



REV GEORGE WASHINGTON NOLLNER. 



In very truth, the Church of Christ is the biggest thing in 
The Universe. — Bishop Joseph S. Key. 



Rev. George Washington Noll- 
ner was born near Pineville, 
Arkansas, January 23rd, 1855. 
His father, Alfred Nollner, and 
mother, Mary Stephens Nollner, 
were both members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South. 
He removed with his parents to 
Crawford County, Missouri, in 
1864. He was converted in 
August, 1871, under the min- 
istry of Rev. S. Mansell, a Bap- 
tist preacher, and a man full of 
faith and the Holy Ghost. He 
had been reared in a Christian 
home, a home of prayer and 
under the Godly training of par- 
ents who had a conscious, joy- 
ous experience of God's love. He 
had always had faith in God and 
never drifted into vice, but his 
conviction was deep and his con- 
version was as clear as a sun- 
burst and he was filled with a 
joy inexpressible and full of 
glory. There has never been 
a doubt in his mind about it 
since. His growth in grace 
was steady, and he had unbroken 
peace with God until he felt 
the call to the ministry and re- 
sisted it, when there followed 
a long, hard struggle, which 
lasted about a year, but when 
he made a complete surrender 
to God, he entered into the Ca- 
naan of perfect love where he 
still dwells. It was a distinct 
work and gave him a victory and 

an abiding place and joy in the Holy Ghost. He was licensed to preach and ordained 
Elder in the Congregational Methodist Church in 1876, but united with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, in 1877. He was recommended to the Annual Conference 
for admission on trial by the West Plains Circuit in August, 1877; Rev. R. A. Brad- 
ley, preacher in charge, and Rev. L. F, Aspley, Presiding Elder; was admitted into 
the Annual Conference at Fredericktown, in October, 1879; Rev. D. J. Marquis, Pre- 
siding Elder, and Bishop George F, Pierce, presiding. His orders as a local Elder 
were recognized at Fredericktown in 1879, and signed by Bishop Pierce. He has served 
the following charges: Eminence Circuit, Piedmont, West Plains, Siloam Springs, 
Williamsville, Washington and New Haven, Hematite, Albuquerque, New Mexico; 
Clayton and Mt. Zion; Mt. Zion; Caledonia; Fayette; Rocheport; New Franklin and 
Clark; Higbee; Ashland; Bowling Green; Edina; Shaw Avenue, St. Louis; Belle- 
fontain Station, his present charge. He has received about three thousand persons 
into the church during his ministry. He built the Dees Chapel Church on the Pied- 
mont Circuit, and the parsonages at New Haven, Mt. Zion and Rocheport. He re- 
ceived his education at the public schools and at a private school conducted by Rev. 
T. E. Carr, a Baptist minister from Boston. He was first married to Miss Susanah 
Scott, December 12th, 1874, and his present wife was Miss Sadina Artie Pehle, to whom 
he was marnied April 28th, 1887, and his children are William C. Nollner, now de- 
ceased, Minnie J. Nollner, Theodosia Nollner, Louis A. Nollner, Annie May Nollner 
and Ralph E. Nollner. He regards his surrender to God and decision to give his life 
to the ministry as the most important crisis in his life. 




390 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




MR. RICHARD M. SCRUGGS. 



Christianity means unselfishness, looking not at one's own things, 
But upon the things of others. — Bishop Hendrix. 



By Rev. James C. Morris, D. D. 

Richard M. Scruggs was born February 10, 1822, and passed into the life beyond 
November 22, 1904. A man whose life can only be fully estimated by God. Mr. Samuel 
Cupples, for many years his most intimate and confidential friend, and his associate 
in the work of the church, made this tribute to him: 

"Richard M. Scruggs was a many-sided man, acquainted with smiles and tears, 
complex in brain and heart. He had intelligence without arrogance, his genius was 
without pride, and his religion without bigotry, or deceit; he cared nothing for place, 
but everything for principle; nothing for money, but for the good he could do for 
others; he neither knelt nor scorned; with him men were neither great nor small; 
they were right, or wrong, and he knew no fear, excepting the fear of doing wrong; 
wealth could not purchase, power could not awe this lovable man; he was all that was 
gentle and just, humorous and honest, charitable, merciful, wise, chivalric, and loyal 
to truth." 

This leaves little to be said. He was a saintly man, a lover of men, a friend and 
helper of any who needed his help. He was the friend of God. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



391 



HON. ALEXANDER HENRY ROBBINS, L L.B. 



Mark the superiority, the ease, the dignity, on the side of the 
More advanced mind. — Coleridge. 



Hon. Alexander Henry Rob- 
bins, son of Alexander H. Rob- 
bins and Anna Robbins, was 
born June 21st, 1875, in the 
City of St. Louis, Missouri. His 
mother's father, George W Rob- 
inson, was captain of a river 
boat used in the service of the 
Southern Confederacy, and was 
captured by Gen. Butler. It is 
through his mother's family that 
he inherits his Southern Meth- 
odist leanings. When he was 
eight years old, his parents 
moved to the vicinity of Cook 
Avenue Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, in St. Louis, and 
he was induced to attend Broth- 
er R. M. Scruggs' afternoon 
Sunday School, and has remain- 
ed there ever since, finally be- 
coming Mr. Scruggs' assistant 
and successor as Superintendent 
of Cook Avenue Afternoon Sun- 
day School. He was converted 
at the age of fifteen at Cook 
Avenue Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, under the min- 
istry of Rev. Dr. B. M. Messick, 
who was and is today his highest 
ideal of a Southern Methodist 
preacher. His conversion was 
uneventful; he had been in the 
Sunday School since he was 
eight years old and had grown 
to love Christ and His church. 
On the occasion of one of Dr. 
Messick's sermons, however, he 

was powerfully convicted of sin and constrained to make his first public confession of 
Christ as his Savior. He has grown strong in the faith through a constant study of 
God's Word. No book in the Holy Writ was ever too forbiddingly abstruse to discourage 
his search after God's message. One man, outside of the Southern Methodist ministry, 
has, above all means, been the instrument in God's hands to enable him to discern won- 
derful things out of God's Word, and that man is William R. Newell, of the Moody Bible 
Institute, who three years ago conducted the most wonderful Bible class, numbering 
twelve hundred, ever seen in the City of St. Louis. His education was received at 
the Divoll Grammar School, the St. Louis High School, Washington University, and 
the St. Louis Law School, graduating from the last named institution with the degree 
of L. L. B. in 1898, since which time he has been actively engaged in the practice of 
law, and later, during the last five years, has been editor-in-chief of the Central 
Law Journal, the largest law periodical in the United States. He was married to 
Miss Katherine Gundelfmger February 26th, 1903, and they have one daughter, Mary 
Anna Robbins, aged three years. 




392 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- ROBERT LEE RUSSELL. 



Go forward unto the Realm which stretches before you; climb 
The highest mountains you can reach, and plant a Cross there. 
— Dr. John G. Holland. 



Rev. Robert Lee Russell was 
born on a farm in Gibson 
County, Tennessee, January 18, 
1869. He is a son of S. H. Rus- 
sell and Dollie A. Russell, both 
of whom are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He was converted at 
Poplar Grove church, near 
where he was born, in August, 
1883, under the ministry of Rev. 
B. F. Peeples, a member of the 
Memphis Conference, and joined 
the church at that time. Though 
young, he was a penitent for 
several days, his sins seeming 
very great to him. His conver- 
sion was so clear and unmistak- 
able that he has never had a 
doubt about it. He felt from 
his conversion his call to the 
ministry, and struggled for four 
years against it. His progress 
since ^ the day he yielded himself 
to this service has been greater, 
and he knows that he has a 
stronger will to do His will, 
and to live only for the good 
of good men and the glory of 
God. He was licensed to preach 
by the Quarterly Conference of 
Bradford Circuit of the Mem- 
phis Conference October 13th, 
1888; Rev. Richard West, 
preacher in charge, and Rev. 
A. R. Wilson, D. D., Presiding 
Elder. The Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Morley and Benton 
charge, St. Louis Conference, in 1892, recommended him to the Annual Confer- 
ence; he was received on trial into the Annual Conference in 1892; Rev. J. T. 
Kendall, Presiding Elder, and Bishop C. B. Galloway, presiding. He was ordained 
Deacon by Bishop Galloway in 1892, at Kirkwood, Missouri; was ordained Elder 
by Bishop A. W Wilson at Charleston, Missouri, in 1896. He has filled the fol- 
lowing appointments: Supply at Benton Station, for summer of 1892; joined Con- 
ference and was returned to Benton, for 1892-1893; Thayer Station, 1893-1895; 
West Plains Station, 1895-1898; Cape Girardeau, 1898-1899; Charleston, 1899-1902; 
Poplar Bluff District, 1902-1903; Kirkwood, 1903-1906; First Church, St. Louis, 1906, 
where he is at present located. About seven hundred persons have been received into 
the church under his ministry. He attended an Academy at Rutherford, Tennessee, 
a Vanderbilt Training School at Henderson, Tennessee, and the Southern Normal of 
Huntingdon, Tennessee. He was married to Miss Inez Leftwich, May 2nd, 1894. 
He thinks the most important crisis in his life, after his conversion, was when, on 
a hot August day between the rows of corn, after a long struggle, he decided to give 
himself to the ministry. 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



393 



REV JOSEPHUS STEPHAN. 



He plucks the fruit, and eats, and feasts, and luxuriates, in the 
Fullness of Eternal Life. — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. Josephus Stephan, son of 
George M. Stephan and Felicite 
F. Stephan, was born February 
26th, 1860, at Madison, Indiana, 
but reared from infancy in 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where 
the family moved in 1860. His 
father was brought up in the 
German Reformed Church, and 
his mother in the Roman Cath- 
olic Church. His parents were 
married in both churches, and 
every child was baptized in the 
Roman Catholic church, but his 
mother becoming angry at a re- 
mark made by a priest from the 
altar, renounced her allegiance 
to the Catholic church and this 
was the means of the whole 
family becoming Methodists. He 
was converted in January, 1877, 
at Houston, Texas, under the 
ministry of Rev. R. T. 'Nabors, 
and joined the church at that 
time. From earliest childhood 
he had convictions and great 
faith in all the facts of Christ- 
ianity. He was very sincere in 
his desire to be saved, but had 
the wrong conception of the con- 
ditions of salvation. From the 
beginning of his Christian life 
he put himself in the attitude 
of consecration, having a great 
struggle to be willing to preach, 
and soon after to go to a for- 
eign mission field, to which he 
offered himself and was ac- 
cepted by the board. But not till May 14th, 1891, did he enter into the true sig- 
nificance of consecration, and through it to find that it is possible in this life to obtain 
perfect love. For fifteen years he has been living in unbroken consciousness of this 
blessing, and has found it to be the condition of joy and liberty in Christian service 
and of growth in knowledge and character. He was licensed to preach by the Quar- 
terly Conference of Shearn Memorial Church, October 7th, 1878; Rev. R. T. Nabors, 
pastor, and Rev. B. D. Dashield, Presiding Elder, in Houston, Texas; recommended 
to the Tennessee Conference for admission on trial by the Quarterly Conference of 
Elm Street Church, Nashville, Tennessee, while a student at Vanderbilt University, 
and the year of his graduation, in the fall of 1883; admitted at Shelbyville, Tennessee, 
October 16th, 1883; Rev. R. K. Brown, Presiding Elder, and Bishop George F. Pierce, 
presiding; ordained local Deacon by Bishop J. C. Keener at Franklin, Tennessee, Octo- 
ber 22nd, 1882; ordained Elder by Bishop H. N. McTyeire, December 6th, 1885, at 
Austin, Texas. Appointments served : November 18th, to October, 1883, junior preacher 
on Stone's River Circuit, with Jeremiah Cullom, senior, as supply (carried on studies 
at Vanderbilt at same time) ; transferred to St. Louis Conference, November 15th, 
1883, Caledonia, Missouri, Station, one year; transferred to Texas Conference and ap- 
pointed to the Franklin Circuit, December 9th, 1884; transferred to St. Louis Confer- 
ence, December 7th, 1885; and stationed at Bonne Terre, where he remained three 
years; September, 1888, Marvin Chapel, St. Louis, and remained three years; Septem- 
ber, 1891, Festus, Missouri, remained two years; October, 1893, Farmington, Missouri, 
two years; September, 1895, DeSoto, Missouri, four years; September, 1899, Mount 
Auburn, St. Louis, four years; September, 1903, Marvin Memorial, St. Louis, three 
years; September, 1906, Shaw Avenue, St. Louis, where he is now serving his first 
year. During his ministry he has received into the church seventeen hundred and fifty 
persons, and at least fifteen hundred and sixty conversions. 




394 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 




DR. JOHN W VAUGHAN. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 395 



DR. JOHN W VAUGHAN, PH.B., M. D. 



To confide in God, well assured that every fact will ultimately 
Appear as a witness for His Glory. — Bishop Marvin. 



Dr. John W. Vaughan was born in St. Louis County, Missouri, in 1857. He is a 
son of William Russell Vaughan and Harriet Newell Vaughan, both members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. His mother was originally a member of the 
Presbyterian Church. He was converted at Marvin camp ground in 1869, under the 
ministry of Bishop Marvin, and joined the church that same year at Bridgeton, St. 
Louis County, Missouri. It was the last night of the meeting, and Bishop Marvin 
preached from the text, "The harvest is past, the summer is ended, and we are not 
saved." Dr. Vaughan has made steady growth in the divine life, and he believes in 
growing by working. He attended Bridgeton Academy, and University of Vienna. 
He graduated from Central College and the St. Louis College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons. Dr. Vaughan is one of the leading physicians of St. Louis. He was married 
to Miss Bessie Farris Walsh, of Austin, Texas, May 30th, 1900. They have one little 
daughter, Harriet Vaughan. Dr. Vaughan says that possibly the most important event 
in his life was his association with Dr. John C. Wills, President of Central College. Dr. 
Vaughan's influence in College was most wholesome, and he led many young men to 
Christ. He is one of the Curators of Central College, Fayette, Missouri, and is Treas- 
urer of the Board of Education of the St. Louis Conference. As a member of the 
General Conference, 1906, he was an active member of the Sunday School and Edu- 
cational Committees. He was the author and formed in detail the resolutions which 
the General Conference passed establishing the Vanderbilt Commission, which was 
given authority to settle the many vexed questions relative to Vanderbilt University. 
Dr. Vaughan is Chairman of the Board of Stewards of Cook Avenue Church, St. Louis, 
Missouri. 



335 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV JOHN SCORE, A. M. 



We ourselves must be transfigured to constantly behold our 
Transfigured and glorified Lord. — Bishop Hendrix. 



By Rev. Arthur Mather, D. D. 

The subject of this sketch 
first saw the light of day in 
the City of Skien, Norway, on 
the 18th day of June, 1865. 

His father was the late 
Bishop Johannes Nilsson Skaar, 
late Metropolitan of the Luthe- 
ran Church in Norway; and 
his mother's name before her 
marriage was Cynthia Pauline 
Vilhelmine Hansen. 

Brother Score was born and 
reared in parsonages of the 
Lutheran Church in his native 
country, and after his father's 
elevation to the Episcopacy, he 
spent his vacations in the Epis- 
copal residence. 

Brother Score was converted 
at Lutesville, Missouri, 1894, 
under the ministry of the Rev. 
J. A. Russell, and the change 
in his life and experience was 
of such a character that he says 
he has never since doubted either 
his acceptance with God, or his 
call to the Christian ministry. 

He was licensed to preach by 
the Quarterly Conference of the 
Lutesville Circuit. He was ad- 
mitted on trial in St. Louis An- 
nual Conference, and ordained 
Local Deacon by Bishop Candler 
on September 25, 1898. 

Six years later he was or- 
dained Elder by Bishop Hendrix. 
His persistent determination 

e^C^aS^ bM A^^ t hat Sadly needed tne S u e pirft!ng iXe^of moT 
the work of tS ; M* n l th T SP f k elo ^ entl y of his devotion Ind consecration^ in 
tne work of the Master whom he serves and loves so well. 

ruthe^svine U Mount Zion^S^' q**™' , Ho ^ ston ' 1 Li bertyville, Kinder's Chapel, Ca- 
leasl ManchSe are hi J Z/' Scr f ugg + S Cha P el at . Valley Park, and last but not 
trand, St : Clafr'and I MancheX ^ t0 Say ^^ ° f the Phages at Ber- 

BroSrw^,? 1 ? 1 SeVe ^ hundred members into the church, 
ville Bertrand and MoSil^P 1 ^ 611 * 8 tf lutesville, Garfield, Houston, Liberty- 
Ser MnlX Morehouse, Caruthersville, Mount Zion, Mount Zion and Man- 
Het^nA M?/ n Y flt 7 Park ' Manchester and Trinity, and Manchester 

from wnk* stt o'f tarnini ^ W ^^ 5™™* of Christiana, Norwayi 
him learning his distinguished father, and elder brothers preceded 

M fS' ? C< £ e was^PPily married on the 14th of July, 1895 to Miss Katie 

K"the' ^TA^Ru^Jr?^' *$? C + er€m0n X ^ ^ °™ ed '* ^ fpirftua 
t?P L fl ~* £ • i Russell > the affection and esteem for whom is shown in 
Ti ™* - heir 0T i y ! 0n ' Joh annes Nilsson Russell Score. Vn m 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



397 



REV- WILLIAM ALPHEUS SWIFT. 



Thrice blest whose lives are faithful prayers; whose loves in 
Higher love endure. — Tennyson. 



■HMn 

m I 



Rev. William Alpheus Swift, 
son of Thomas F. Swift and Dol- 
lie Swift, both members of the 
Presbyterian Church, was born 
in Calloway County, Kentucky, 
in 1872. He was converted in 
1886 at Mt. Carmel Methodist 
Church, Kentucky, under the 
ministry of Rev. P. H. Fields, 
and joined the Church at that 
time. He went to church with 
the purpose of listening to a 
preacher whom his mother had 
often spoken of with the high- 
est esteem, and felt that he must 
have Christ then, and never 
stopped until he had found Him. 
As he progressed in the Chris- 
tian life, he found his soul 
longed for still a richer experi- 
ence — consecration, faith and 
works — and God is answering 
his prayer. He was licensed to 
preach in 1891 by the Quarterly 
Conference of Farmington Cir- 
cuit, Memphis Annual Confer- 
ence; Rev. W. J. Carlton, 
preacher in charge, and Rev. J. 
M. Spence, Presiding Elder. He 
was recommended to the Annual 
Conference for admission on 
trial by the Waverly District 
Conference of Illinois in May, 
1895; received into the Annual 
Conference in 1895; Rev. J. D. 
Brooks, Presiding Elder, and 
Bishop 0. P. Fitzgerald, presid- 
ing; ordained Deacon by Bishop 
0. P. Fitzgerald in 1895, at Clay City, Illinois; ordained Elder by Bishop 0. P. Fitz- 
gerald in 1899, at Clay City, Illinois. Appointments filled: Glen Carbon, Illinois; 
Alhambra and Glen Carbon, Illinois; Sherman and Glenarm. Illinois; DeSoto, Illinois, 
Circuit; St. Clair Station, Missouri; Marion Station, Illinois. Presiding Elder Gosport 
District, Illinois; Tabernacle and Charleston, Memphis Conference; Little Rock, Ar- 
kansas. Between one thousand and twelve hundred persons have united with the 
Church under his ministry. Two churches in the Illinois Conference, one in the 
Memphis Conference and one at Little Rock, are the churches that have been built 
under his pastorates. He received his education at Farmington Institute and West 
Kentucky Normal College. He considers his conversion as possibly the most important 
crisis in his life. Wesley's, Moody's, Talmage's and Sam P. Jones' Sermons have been 
some of the books that have greatly helped him, aside from the Bible, in his religious 
life. He believes the Christian College, if thoroughly religious, a very good thing for 
the Church and State. 




398 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- S. H. WERLEIN, D.D. 



The Foundation of all human Excellence must be laid deep in 
The Blood of the Redeemer's Cross, and in the power of His 
Resurrection. — Dr. Frederick W Robertson. 



Rev. S. H. Werlein was born 
in Clinton, Mississippi. His 
parents, Philip P. Werlein and 
Margaret Halsey Werlein were 
the proprietors and managers 
of a Female Academy at Clin- 
ton, Mississippi. After a brief 
residence in Mississippi, the 
family moved to New Orleans, 
Louisiana, where the subject of 
this sketch spent his boyhood 
and early manhood. He united 
with Felicity Street Church un- 
der the pastorate of the late Dr. 
Linus Parker, afterwards 
Bishop. Here he met some of 
the choicest spirits of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South. 
After his graduation at Emory 
and Henry College, Virginia, of 
which Dr. E. E. Wiley was 
president, he yielded to a call to 
the ministry and spent two and 
one-half years at Drew Theo- 
logical Seminary. He often vis- 
ited New York City and Brook- 
lyn and heard a number of the 
great pulpit orators of these 
great centers of population, and 
preached in a number of the 
churches of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. It was his good 
fortune while a student at Drew 
to become acquainted with some 
of the leaders of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and the kind- 
ness and hospitality extended to 
the student from the South re- 
main a green spot in his memory to this day. In 1876 he returned to Louisiana and 
served as pastor of the church in Algiers, and later Louisiana Avenue, in New 
Orleans proper. From 1879 to 1883 he was the pastor of the Charles Shearn Me- 
morial Church in Houston, Texas, which church building was constructed during his 
pastorate. Returning to New Orleans, one year was spent as pastor of Louisiana 
Avenue Church, where he inaugurated the construction of a new church, and after 
three years at Felicity Street Church and the rebuilding of that edifice destroyed by 
fire, he was transferred to Lafayette Park Church, at St. Louis. During a residence 
of ten and one-half years in St. Louis, more than seven years were devoted to Lafay- 
ette Park Church, two to Centenary and one year to the Presiding Eldership. St. Louis 
became very much endeared to him, and he left that great metropolis with genuine 
regret. Three years followed at Kansas City. First Church at Fort Worth, Texas, 
was his next field of labor, followed by a most pleasant pastorate at Austin, Texas, 
where he is now spending his fourth and last year. In 1898, while a member of the 
St. Louis Conference, he was elected as a delegate to the General Conference held at 
Baltimore. His zeal in the Master's work is unabated, and he expects to devote his 
entire life to the work of the itinerant ministry. He expects to have no other home 
in this world than a Methodist parsonage, and trusts when the time comes for labor 
to cease, that mortal life may at the same time end. His one thought is to make full 
proof of his ministry and lead many others to Christ. In 1878 he was married to Miss 
Leila Ewing, of Louisiana, and to them were born six sons, five of them still living. 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



399 



REV- LUTHER EDWARD TODD, A.B. 



The grandest characters, purest in faith, noblest in life, 
Attempting and accomplishing greatest things for God, are those 
Who grapple with the hardest problems of every day. — Bishop 
Galloway. 



Rev. Luther Edward Todd 
was born September 16th, 1874, 
at New Franklin, Missouri. He 
is a son of Theodore H. Todd 
and Cordelia B. Todd, both mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He was con- 
verted in 1884, at New Frank- 
lin, Missouri, under the minis- 
try of Rev. J. H. Hager, and 
joined the Church at that time. 
There was nothing very strange 
or unusual about his conversion, 
but he does know that he was 
saved. He has experienced a 
very perceptible growth in 
grace since the time of his con- 
version, and has now a clearer 
and better understanding of the 
things of God, and a more per- 
fect love toward God and man. 
He was licensed to preach in 
April, 1897; Rev. F. Marvin, 
D.D., pastor, and Rev. J. R. A. 
Vaughan, Presiding Elder. The 
Fayette District Conference rec- 
ommended him to the Annual 
Conference for admission on 
trial in April, 1897. He was or- 
dained Deacon by Bishop Gran- 
bery, at Fulton, Missouri, Sep- 
tember 16th, 1900; ordained El- 
der by Bishop Wilson at Chilli- 
cothe, Missouri. Brother Todd 
has served the following ap- 
pointments: Fulton Circuit, as 
supply, one year; Hundley 
Church, St. Joseph, four years; 

First Church, St. Louis, Missouri, three years; he is now serving Lafayette Park 
Church, at St. Louis. About eleven hundred and twenty-three persons have been con- 
verted and taken into the Church under his ministry. Under his pastorates the follow- 
ing churches and parsonages were built: Hyde Park Church, St. Joseph; repaired 
Hundley Church, St. Joseph; repaired First Church, St. Louis, $6,000, and built par- 
sonage at First Church, St. Louis, $6,000. His education was received at the public 
school of New Franklin, Missouri, at Central College for five years, from which he 
was graduated with the degree of A.B., and at Vanderbilt University. He was married 
September 17th, 1901, to Miss Margaret Lee Wheeler, of St. Joseph, Missouri, and two 
children have been born to them, to-wit, Mary Elizabeth Todd and Virginia Lee Todd. 
He thinks the most important crisis in his life was the fight he had to surrender to the 
call to preach. Dr. Todd is gifted as a revivalist, and he organizes his Church to the 
best advantage. He preaches unto the edification of his people. 




400 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV ALBERT T. TIDWELL. 



The more of Holliness the saved soul possesses, the more of 
Happiness will Heaven yield to him. — Dean Tillett. 



The Rev. Albert T. Tidwell 
was born in Madison County, 
Mississippi, October 7th, 1845. 
The Presbyterians offered him 
help in his preparation for the 
ministry, conditioned on his en- 
tering the Presbyterian minis- 
try. He declined the offer, as 
he believed the doctrines of the 
Methodist Church, and preferred 
to work his way through Col- 
lege and remain a Methodist, 
rather than accept help at the 
cost of his convictions. Eu 
joined the Mississippi Confer- 
ence in December, 1873, at Bran- 
don, Mississippi; Bishop Wight- 
man ordained him Deacon at 
this Conference and he was ap- 
pointed to the Sharon Circuit. 
He was sent to Grove Street 
Mission, Vicksburg, by Bishop 
Paine. His Presiding Elder, Dr. 
F M. Featherstone, released him 
from this charge, and in Octo- 
ber he entered Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity. His health soon failed, 
he accepted work in the St. 
Louis Conference, and was as- 
signed to the Washington Cir- 
cuit by Rev. John E. Godbey, 
D.D., Presiding Elder of the 
Salem District. In 1875 he was 
transferred to the St. Louis 
Conference, and was appointed 
by Bishop McTyeire to Mt. 
Olive Circuit in St. Louis Dis- 
trict. He served this charge four 
years. During this pastorate, he married Miss Fannie Evelyn Matson. From Mt. Olive 
Circuit he was sent to the Labaddie Circuit. At the session of the Conference in 1880, 
at Salem, Missouri, he was ordained Elder by Bishop Keener; he was sent to Rolla in 
1882; Sikeston and Bertrand, three years; Caledonia, two years; Arcadia, two years, 
when, his health being broken down, he was placed on the superannuated list. Soon 
after this he obtained work with the Children's Home Society of Missouri, as District 
Superintendent. In September, 1892, he was elected Assistant State Superintendent 
and held that relation till May, 1901. Having adopted the well known Methodist 
motto, 'Never be unemployed and never be triflingly employed," he worked up to the 
limit of his strength. He never had a doubt as to the truth of the Bible and he began 
to seek religion when a young child, but could not rust God's precious words, and the 
blessing of salvation was long delayed. So gradual was the change that he could never 
tell just when he became a child of God, but the witness of the spirit was given and for 
many years there was not a day but His presence was felt. In 1891 he felt that he 
must settle the question of sanctification, which he did to his entire satisfaction. He 
had seen almost from the time of accepting Jesus as his Saviour that there was a 
satisfying portion offered in the Bible which he did not have. In June of 1891, this 
satisfaction was given, and since then his experience has been on a higher plane. His 
mother died in her eighty-fourth year. Her beautiful life and her sweet testimony to 
the love of God, forever fixed in his mind the truth of experimental religion. He has 
often said, "Under God, I owe all to my mother." 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



401 



REV. JAMES ELBERT WOODWARD. 



The marvelous fabric the social loom was set to weaving is Man. 
— Dr. James W Lee. 



Rev. James Elbert Woodward, 
son of William Woodward and 
Delila Gower Woodward, was 
born in Nashville, Tennessee, 
August 20th, 1867. Converted 
at thirteen years of age, he be- 
came a member of Elm Street 
Methodist Church, under the 
pastorate of Dr. R. K. Brown. 
After receiving his education in 
his native city, Mr. Woodward 
engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness as salesman until October, 
1894, when he was received into 
the Tennessee Conference at 
Franklin. He was granted a 
license to preach by Tulip Street 
Quarterly Conference, December 
11th, 1893, consequently being 
in the local ranks less than one 
year when admitted into the 
traveling connection. In De- 
cember, 1890, Mr. Woodward 
was elected the first Epworth 
League President of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South. 
This league being organized by 
Dr. W. G. E. Cunningham, at 
Tulip Street Church, on the 
evening of the day the Sunday 
School Board planned and 
named the League. He was 
President of the Epworth 
League Conference of Nashville, 
which place he resigned to en- 
ter the work of the ministry. 
From childhood, Mr. Woodward 
had felt a desire to become a 

Methodist preacher, and this call was realized more fully when, at the age of fifteen, 
he bade good-bye to his Sunday School teacher, Miss Kate Roberts, who went as a 
Missionary to China. He received much instruction from his pastors and other godly 
men, as Dr. R. K. Brown, Rev. J. P. McFerrin, Rev. J. B. Erwin, Rev. Lewis Powell, 
Rev. T. B. Fisher, Rev. J. T. Curry, and others. His first appointment was Wartrace 
Circuit, where in his two years' pastorate he received more than two hundred souls 
into the Church. At the end of this term he was transferred to the Illinois Conference, 
where three years of hard work were given, but the happy results linger as a precious 
memory. In the fall of 1899, Dr. J. W. Lee, Presiding Elder of the St. Louis District, 
invited Mr. Woodward to come to the St. Louis Conference. The transfer was made 
by Bishop Granbery and three years were spent in charge of Bridgeton Station, a 
pleasant suburb of St. Louis. The next year, 1902, he was appointed to St. Clair 
Station, in the Washington District, with Rev. W. R. Mays, Presiding Elder. This 
proved to be a most successful year, but owing to family affliction, Mr. Woodward was 
advised to transfer back to Tennessee, his native climate. He was appointed then to 
McEwen, Tennessee, where he completed and dedicated an unfinished church, and the 
next fall was sent to his present station, Erin, at which place he completed and dedi- 
cated a beautiful church building, and in which pastorate he is now serving his third 
year. While stationed in St. Louis, Mr. Woodward, with Mr. W. M. Sloan, a promi- 
nent Methodist layman, organized in the slum district of the city what is known as 
"Sloan Mission," which is now a flourishing and self-supporting church. This work 
was prompted by Dr. W- F. McMurry, the Presiding Elder. 




402 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



'■-.;;?■:- 




MRS. EMELINE GIST BOYLE. 



By Rev. J. H. Young, D.D. 

I esteem it a sacred privilege to be permitted to speak at this time a few words 
of loving appreciation of one of the saintliest characters that ever lived. And yet I do 
it with many misgivings, for I am only too conscious that this life which has been 
passed among us was in its inspirations and conscious attainments so far above my 
own experience that both ideas and words fail me in giving it adequate interpretation. 
Sister Boyle lived upon a plane so far above ordinary Christian experiences, and in 
such constant and intimate communion with her Lord, that I feel I can speak of her 
only from the standpoint of one who views from a distance. I am sure, then, I shall 
have the sympathy of these loving friends before me, who with me have often knelt 
at the feet of our sainted sister and felt the same sense of their littleness and un- 
worthiness in the presence of a life so pure and exalted. 

Mrs. Emeline Gist Boyle was born in Baltimore in 1813. She was a descendant of 
Christopher Gist, who came to Maryland from England in 1682. During her infancy, 
her father, Colonel Cornelius Howard Gist, moved from Baltimore with his family to 
his plantation in Brooke County, Virginia. In 1836 she was married to Rev. Joseph 
Boyle. Six years later she came with her husband to St. Louis, he having been 
assigned to the pastorate of Fourth Street Church, then located at the corner of 
Fourth and Washington Avenue. Always a most effective aid to her husband, she 
served, in turn, Centenary, First Church, St. John's, Boonville, Independence and Jeffer- 
son City Churches, as well as the larger work of the St. Louis District. Thus for 
sixty-five years Sister Boyle has been prominently identified with Missouri Methodism 
most of the time in St. Louis. Always an active servant of the Master — even to the 
day of her passing away — only eternity can reveal the glorious results of her ministry 
in our community. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— ST. LOUIS DISTRICT. 



403 




CENTENARY CHURCH, ST. LOUIS, MO. 



This is one of the great churches of Methodism. Many noble pastors have labored 
here. Here Rev. W F McMurry, D.D., received over two thousand people into the 
Church during his four years' pastorate. 



404 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE. 



1 806-CENTENNIAL APPOINTMENTS— 1 906. 



DESOTO DISTRICT. 



J. R. A. Vaughan. .Presiding Elder 

Bethel Ct.. .R. C. Carpenter 

Bourbon Ct. . J. L. Profitt 

DeSoto Sta.. W A. Humphreys 

DeSoto Ct.. .Supplied by J. R. Kincaid 
Eureka and Crescent. .L. D. Nichol 

Festus Sta.. . . W. J. Velvick 

Fenton and Valley Park..T. M. Patterson 
Hematite Ct.. W. H. Cunningham 

Labaddie Ct.. ... .A. E. Carson 

Manchester Sta.. ... .John Score 



Mi Zion and Trinity 
New Haven Sta.. 
Plattin Ct.. 



Red Bird Ct.. 
Salem Sta.. 
Salem Ct. . 
Steelvillci Sta.. 
Scotia Ct.. 
St. Janios Sta.. 
St. Cla'r Sta.. 
Washington Sta.. 



.J. R. Eddlemon 

.E. J. Rinkel 

. Sup. by Jasper N. Sitton 

.Sup. by E. M. Rowe 

.M. H. Markley 

. D. R. Davis 

F. R. Poage 

.Sup. l;y J. C. Read 

.Sup. by H. S. Illinois 

.C. D i>ans 

William Lowe 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— DE SOTO DISTRICT. 



405 



REV- JAMES R. A. VAUGHAN, A.M. 



The eternal calm of an invulnerable Faith; 

The repose of a heart set deep in God. — Drummond. 



Rev. James R. A. Vaughan, 
son of William R. and Harriet 
N Vaughan, was born Decem- 
ber 8th, 1850, near Bridgeton, 
Missouri. Both parents were 
members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. He joined 
the Church at Eden Chapel, St. 
Louis Circuit, under the minis- 
try of Rev. Joseph W. Lewis, 
D.D., and Rev. Wesley Brown- 
ing, in February, 1864. He was 
converted within the next two 
or three years, but the time is 
not well marked. After he had 
been several years a member of 
the Church and regular in at- 
tendance upon the means of 
grace, being much concerned 
about his real condition, he put 
the whole case into the hands 
of God, and felt that whether 
lost or saved, the responsibility 
was now with Him, and with 
that he had the beginning of a 
peace that has continued and 
increased. From the time of 
settling the call to the ministry, 
when about eighteen years old, 
he grew stronger and had many 
periods of spiritual joy. When 
he had been twenty-two years in 
the ministry he saw with a new 
and clear light that the baptism 
of the Holy Ghost was a might- 
ier experience than he had yet 
known. Almost at once, with 

Q66D SP3,T fill TIP'S rLG XY1£L QG tllG 

consecration to receive the Spirit. That date is even more definite than his conversion, 
and from that time his experience became fuller and richer, and his usefulness greatly 
enlarged. He was licensed to preach in December, 1871, by the Quarterly Conference 
of Fayette Station; Rev. J. H. Ledbetter, preacher in charge, and Rev. William Penn,. 
Presiding Elder; recommended to the Annual Conference by the same Quarterly Con- 
ference in June, 1873; received into the Annual Conference on trial in September, 
1873, at Carrollton, Missouri; Bishop W. M. Wightman, presiding; ordained Deacon 
by Bishop John C. Keener, October 10th, 1875, at Glasgow, Missouri; ordained Elder 
by Bishop David S. Doggett, September 15th, 1878, at Macon, Missouri. Appointments 
served are: Arch Street, Hannibal, Missouri, 1873-1875; Kirksville Circuit, 18 < 5- 
1876; Macon Station, 1876-1877; Fayette Station, 1877-1881; Colorado Springs, Denver 
Conference, 1881-1883; Las Vegas Station, and President Seminary, 1883-1884; Trini- 
dad Station, 1884-1886; Shelbina Circuit, 1886-1887; Palmyra Station, 1887-1889; 
Hannibal District, 1889-1891; Chillicothe Station, 1891-1892; Brunswick Station, 189Z- 
1894; Fayette District, 1894-1898; Fulton Station, 1898-1899; Louisiana Station 1899- 
1900; Kirkwood Station, 1900-1901; Farmington District, 1901-1905; DeSoto District, 
1905. The church at Kirksville was built and one at Lakenan bought, the Palmyra 
church rebuilt, and the parsonage at Colorado Springs built, during his pastorate at 
those places. He received his education at Bridgeton Academy, and Central College, 
from which he graduated in 1873, with the degree of A.M. He was married to Miss 
Martha Winn, Januarv 11th, 1877, and they have four children— Mary, Russell, Arthur 
and Helen. The most' effective factor in shaping his life was the fact that his lathers 
house was always the home of the Methodist pastors who visited there almost every 
week, and not less was his subsequent course at Central College under the teaching 
and ministry of Dr. John C. Wills, Dr. Wesley G. Miller, Prof. F. X. Forster and 
Prof. O. H. P. Corprew, and the association with an earnest student body. In his 
early Christian life, important factors in his conviction and conversion were Baxter s- 
"Call to the Unconverted," "Saints' Rest," and Abbott's "Young Christian. 




406 



CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV- WILLIAM AUSTIN HUMPHREYS. 



It is a divine thing to lift human associations and sympathies 
To the heavenly places and shape them, after their true and 
Original intent. — Bishop Wilson. 



Rev. William Austin Hum- 
phreys, son of William W. 
Humphreys and Emma Hum- 
phreys, was born near Bertrand, 
Missouri, January 20th, 1867. 
He was converted at a revival 
meeting at Bertrand, Missouri, 
in 1881, under the ministry of 
Rev. I. L. Spencer, and united 
with the Church at the same 
time and place. His sister was 
converted first and went to him 
and led him to the altar, where 
he soon found the light. The 
first few years of his Christian 
life were spent without making 
any perceptible development in 
the Christian graces, but T \hen 
about nineteen years of age he 
began to realize something of 
the responsibilities of a Chris- 
tian, and has been an active 
worker in the Church since that 
time. His growth in grace has 
been gradual, but constant, and 
at the time of his surrender to 
enter the ministry, he experi- 
enced a wonderful uplift. He 
was licensed to preach May 
14th, 1894, by the Quarterly 
Conference of Charleston, Mis- 
souri; Rev. J. L. Batten was 
pastor, and Rev. M. H. Moore, 
D.D., Presiding Elder. The 
same Quarterly Conference rec- 
ommended him for admission on 
trial into the Annual Confer- 

™;,™j ± ■ i ■ ±. ±i c,. t • ^ ence > September 22nd, 1894: re- 

ceived on trial into the St Louis Conference in 1894; Rev. M. H. Moore, D.D., Presiding 

ni!S/ a+i, i?3? ; ?;--u H w drix ' P residin g; ordained Deacon by Bishop A. W. Wilson, 
October 4th 1896 at Charlston, Missouri; ordained Elder by Bishop W. A. Chandler, 

PpSf!^fi r r- h ' h 89S i'ea^?£ 0t % MissourL He has served the following charges: 
1000? Arr H q^V 189 iVn 8 n 9 ?ino Pie ^ mont Circuit > 1896-1898; Dexter Circuit, 1898- 
11?*™ rcadla . Sta £ on > 1900-1903; Pestus Station, 1903-1905; DeSoto Station, where 
w*i 5. rl erV1 S g I S6 £ - nd year ' Five hun dred and thirty-eight persons have united 
5 ' Mi«?c • -n un . der . hl f 1 . m "J!stry. He received his education in the public schools 
?n«? i?i? iPP1 n°T ty ' m th £ H T lgh . Sch001 at Cairo > imnois > and in Bryant and Strat- 
Tno-L a^i SS r5° "-fJS in x. St - J . L J 0U i s ' He was married the first time to Miss Ruth 
FSSh r^SF ^V 89 \ Wh ° die , d 0ctober 4th > I 902 ' He was married again to Miss 
SSr iSS £ ? ' ?i°7 ei !J er 3rd ' 1904 ' and has one child > Jessie Ruth Humphreys. He 
to StS 5,- . , °t t h - mmistr y> especially the struggle he had before surrendering 
L wt ?i '.1 h TJ the ^ ost important crisis in his life. Some of the book! 
"T^fp „f mC tl 7> S ed J 11 ™' aside 1 from the Bible ' are "Wesley's Sermons and Life," 
Batten «E y T il he P GW E ^ h J Stron ^ " The New Citizenship," by Samuel Z. 
"r£p »VirfSwS » on /£ w S?' <& Gordon; ' Gold Foi1 '" b y J - G - Holland; Doddridge's 
of \Z ™,™ ™ g J ' / nd Hal1 S , "^"Pte" History." He believes the higher education 
of the young men and women of today is the work of the Church and not the state. 




ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— DE SOTO DISTRICT. 



407 



REV JOHN RANDALL KINCAID. 



Outward goodness is the fruit of inward grace. — Bishop Marvin. 



Rev. John Randall Kincaid, 
son of John F. Kincaid and 
Mary S. Kincaid, was born 
March 27th, 1864, in Marion 
County, Missouri. Both parents 
were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He 
joined the Church at Andrew 
Chapel, Marion County, Mis- 
souri, in the summer of 1878, 
but was not consciously convert- 
ed until about seven years later 
in a meeting held by Rev. S. H 
Milam. His conversion came 
very clearly and suddtftly after 
some years of trying to live 
without God and His grace. He 
has had a constant growth in 
grace and a definite and con- 
scious epoch in his religious ex- 
perience. His understanding of 
God and His Word was en- 
larged, his will to do good 
strengthened, and his love per- 
fected. He was licensed to 
preach by the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of Oak Dale on the Hun- 
newell Circuit in May, 1889; 
Rev. W. W. McMurry, Presid- 
ing Elder, and Rev. C. T. Mc- 
Anally, preacher in charge; the 
same Quarterly Conference rec- 
ommended him for admission on 
trial. He was received into the 
Annual Conference on trial at 
Montgomery City, in 1892; Rev. 
John Anderson, D.D., Presiding 

Elder, and Bishop C. B. Gallo- „ . _ , . 

way, presiding; ordained Deacon by Bishop Haygood at Monroe City, in beptemoer, 
1893; ordained Elder by Bishop Galloway in September, 1896, at Hannibal, Missouri. 
Appointments served: Braymer, Harris, Green Castle, Monroe City, Wayland, Lake- 
nan, DeSoto Circuit. One hundred and sixty-eight persons have been added to tne 
Church during the years of his ministry. The following churches were built while he 
was pastor: "Elmwood," in Sullivan County; Providence, Adair County; and Way- 
land, Clark County. He received his education at the public schools, and at Centenary 
Academy, Palmyra, Missouri. He was married to Miss Rose Rich, November Zdrd, 
1897, and they have one child, Randall Rich Kincaid. Possibly the mose important 
crisis in his life was when he decided to turn his back on the world and live lor Lrod. 
The crisis came after his conversion, when he began to doubt if, after all, there was 
anything in religion, or if it were all a delusion. He decided that for him he would 
serve the Lord, and soon thereafter answered the call to enter the ministry. Watson s 
Institutes, "The Man of Gallilee," "Making of a Man," and "The Spirit Filled Lite 
have been some of the books that have greatly helped him, aside from the Bible, in 
his religious life. 




408 CENTENNIAL VOLUME OF MISSOURI METHODISM. 



REV WILLIAM LOWE. 



I soar sublime above earth's dust and care 

And wing my way to Heaven with flight divine. 

— Dr. William A. Quayle. 



Rev. William Lowe was born in Bakewell, Derbyshire, England, and came to this 
country in 1854. His father and grandfather were both Methodist preachers. Brother 
William Lowe became a member of the Methodist Church in England when a boy. He 
was licensed to preach by the Bath Circuit, Washington District, of the North Carolina 
Conference; Rev W. Closs, D.D., Presiding Elder. He was ordained local Deacon at 
Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1855, by Bishop Parker. He supplied the Hatteras 
Mission one year, afterwards Sladesville, two years; and Swan Quarter Circuit, one 
year; and Columbia Circuit, three years. At the end of the second year at Columbia 
he was admitted on trial into the North Carolina Conference, and was transferred to 
the St. Louis Conference in 1889, by Bishop Duncan, and stationed at Dexter, where 
he remained two years; his next charge was Bertrand, in the Charleston District, where 
he remained one year. He was ordained Elder at Kirkwood by Bishop Galloway, in 
1892, and appointed to Bellefontaine, in the St. Louis District, where he remained four 
years; New Madrid, one year; Poplar Bluff, two years; Arcadia, one year; again to 
Dexter, three years; Maiden, one year; Lutesville and Marble Hill, one year; his 
present charge is at Washington, Missouri. 



ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE— DE SOTO DISTRICT. 



409 




REV- MORSE HAMLIN MARKLEY. 



Talent develops itself in solitude; 
Character in the stream of life. — Goethe. 



Rev. Morse Ham